Archive | May, 2009

books

Thomas J. Garland Library collection increases at rapid pace

Posted on 28 May 2009 by srichey@tusculum.edu

According to Jack Smith, director of the library and professor of library science and history, over the past seven years, the Thomas J. Garland Library has added many new titles to its circulating print collections.  At this point, said Smith, “the institutional goal of 65,000 print titles on the shelves in Greeneville is visible.”books

Over the past two years, and for the first time in the school’s history, more than 4,800 print titles were added to the shelves, including 1,000 from the Walter T. Durham Collection.

In addition, the library has an on-going program of collection evaluation with regards to print and electronic titles both on the main campus and at the Knoxville branch. Faculty input is continuously sought and encouraged, said Smith. Titles removed from collections during this ongoing process are made available to students, faculty and other patrons.

As of 2008-09, the Greeneville library housed a paper monograph collection of 47,952, up from 37,200 in the 2004-05 school year. In addition, there are currently 104,257 electronic books available.

Visitation to the Greeneville and Knoxville libraries is also up, particularly in the area of electronic visits. According to Smith, electronic visits to the Garland Library during the 2008-09 reporting period again passed the half million mark at 511,939.

According to State of Tennessee figures released in April 2009, Tusculum College made more use (438,802 visits) of the Tennessee Electronic Library in calendar year 2008 than any other academic institution. Among public institutions, the University of Tennessee at Knoxville was second with 241,701 visits; while among private institutions, Freed-Hardeman University was just behind Tusculum College with 421,584, followed by the University of Memphis with 208,457.

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Doak House Museum hosts more than 620 students for ‘Lessons From the Lawn’

Posted on 20 May 2009 by eestes@tusculum.edu

lawn1The Doak House Museum hosted more than 620  elementary school students for its annual “Lessons From the Lawn” educational program on May 1.

Students from the Greene County, Jefferson County, Johnson City and Washington County school systems spent the day at the museum on the Tusculum College campus learning about many aspects of agrarian life.

The day began with the disking of the garden behind the Doak House by two Percheron work horses, Duke and Daisy. They were handled by Brett Sivert, a 2005 graduate of Tusculum College. The Doak House was the 19th century home of the Rev. Samuel Witherspoon Doak, co-founder of Tusculum College, and his family.

lawn3The youngsters then visited 23 learning stations on the grounds. At the stations, the students learned about beekeeping, raising sheep and goats, making candles and growing herbs.

The hands-on activities included planting corn and marigolds in the freshly plowed garden, making paper woven butterflies, storybook reading, spotted cow art, planting flowers to take home, cleaning and carding wool and decorating cookies.

The students also were told stories by professional storyteller Linda Poland and toured the springhouse on the grounds. In celebration of May Day, the students did a traditional dance around a May pole.

Among the organizations and individuals helping with the learning stations were the Hands On! Museum, Brett Sivert, Ed Bowman with sheep, Walter and Judy Shelton with goats, Eastside Garden Club, and Maria Jenkins of the Washington County Beekeepers Association. Helping the Museums of Tusculum College with the event were a number of volunteers. The museums also received the assistance of Fatz Cafe, Ingles, Sodexho, and faculty and staff from the Tusculum College Departments of Athletics, English and Science as well as the college’s Office of the Provost and the Center for Civic Advancement.

lessons2The Doak House Museum and the President Andrew Johnson Museum and Library are administered by the Tusculum College Department of Museum Program and Studies under the direction of George Collins, director of Museum Program and Studies, and Cindy Lucas, associate director of the department and director of the Doak House Museum. The department also offers one of the few undergraduate degree programs in museum studies in the country.

The Doak House Museum, the 19th century home of the Rev. Samuel Witherspoon Doak, co-founder of Tusculum College, hosted more than 10,000 school children from East Tennessee last year for a variety of educational programs related to the 19th century and CHARACTER COUNTS!  The Andrew Johnson Museum, located in the oldest academic building on campus, houses a collection of books, papers and memorabilia of the 17th president of the United States.  The museum also houses the Charles Coffin Collection from the original college library and the College archives containing documents related to the history of Tusculum.  The museums are also two of the 10 structures on the Tusculum campus on the National Register of Historic Places.

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New Jersey Alumni Reception and Dinners to be June 10-11

Posted on 20 May 2009 by eestes@tusculum.edu

newjerseyNew Jersey alumni and alumni who will be in that area are invited to the annual Tusculum College Alumni Receptions and Dinners on June 10 and 11 in the Bridgewater and Cherry Hill areas.

The receptions in New Jersey have been well attended in past years and are always an enjoyable time for fellowship and reminiscing about days at the Alma Mater. This year, alumni will also have the special opportunity to meet Tusculum College’s new President Dr. Nancy B. Moody.

newjersey2The first reception will be on June 10 at the Bridgewater Marriott (700 Commons Way, Bridgewater, NJ 08807). The second reception follows on June 11 in the Cherry Hill area. It will be at the Tavistock Country Club (1 Tavistock Lane, Haddonfield, NJ 08807).

Both events will begin with a cash bar reception at 6:30 p.m. followed by the dinner at 7:15 p.m. The cost for each dinner is $30 per person.

Please RSVP by Friday, June 5. To make reservations, please call 1-800-729-0256 ext. 5303, (423) 636-7303 or email reservations to bsell@tusculum.edu. Please indicate which reception you and your guest (s) will be attending. For directions to the alumni events or to register online, please visit https://www.tusculum.edu/alumni/reception.php.

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Tusculum College Night at the Smokies coming on June 5

Posted on 20 May 2009 by eestes@tusculum.edu

smokieslogo1Alumni, students, faculty and staff are invited to a night at the ball park on Friday, June 5, for Tusculum College Night at Tennessee Smokies Park near Sevierville.

All Tusculum College alumni, students, faculty, staff and their families/guests will receive a discounted ticket price when tickets are ordered in advance. The special discounted field level tickets will be $8 each, a savings of $2 off the ticket price. The purchase deadline is June 4.

The game between the Tennessee Smokies and the Chattanooga Lookouts will begin at 7:15 p.m., and a free fireworks show will follow the game.

To reserve your seats, call Andy Kroeger at the Tennessee Smokies at (865) 286-2308 or fax him at (865) 523-9913.

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Tri-Cities and Morristown GPS Celebrations coming in June

Posted on 20 May 2009 by eestes@tusculum.edu

gps_graphciExcitement is building for the next two celebrations of the 25th anniversary of the Graduate and Professional Studies (GPS) Programs that are coming in June. A celebration in the Tri-Cities area will be Saturday, June 20, at the Meadowview Convention Center in Kingsport. The celebration in Morristown will follow almost a week later on Friday, June 26, at The Country Club.

Alumni of the programs, faculty, former faculty, staff and current students are invited to join these celebrations, which are being organized by groups of alumni, faculty and staff.

GPS, formerly known as TALL and TAG programs, is celebrating the program’s 25th anniversary in 2009. Since 1984, more than 5,000 working adults have realized their dreams by earning a bachelor’s or master’s degree through the GPS program.

The celebrations will culminate with a celebration on October 17 in Greeneville.

For more information about the celebrations, to make reservations, to see a list of attendees or updates on the events, please visit this special Web page created for the anniversary (make link to Web page http://www.tusculum.edu/adult/anniversary.html).  If you have questions about the events, please contact Cody Greene ’08, coordinator of development and alumni relations, at 423-636-7331 or ccgreene@tusculum.edu.

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Tusculum College’s Distinguished Service Award recipients are Dr. Sam Miller and the late Dr. Don Henard

Posted on 20 May 2009 by eestes@tusculum.edu

Two Distinguished Service Award recipients were honored on May 15 at Tusculum College’s annual President’s Dinner, held at Link Hills Country Club. Honored were Dr. Sam Miller and the late Dr. Don Henard. Henard’s award was presented to his wife, Jean Henard.

The 2009 awards were presented by Tusculum College President Nancy B. Moody. Assisting with the presentations were Marilyn duBrisk, director of the College’s Arts Outreach program, who read the citation presented to Dr. Miller; and Chairman of the Board of Trustees Dr. Ken Bowman, who read the citation presented to Mrs. Henard.

millerIn his comments after receiving the honor, Miller focused on vision and how the Acts, Arts, Academia series and the restoration of Annie Hogan Byrd Fine Arts Building started with a small meeting of a few people who had a vision and followed it through.  He encouraged the more than 150 attendees to keep following their vision for the future of Tusculum College.

Dr. Miller, a member of the Tusculum College Class of 1935, is “an alumnus, physician, poet, educator, patron of the arts, visionary and servant leader,” the citation read.  His associations with Tusculum College include the lifelong ties made among the six members of his immediate family who have attended Tusculum College.  Dr. Miller has established a pattern of positive involvement in college, community and family that he has carried on since his student days at Tusculum College.

Dr. Miller graduated from the University of Virginia Medical School in 1950 and began a family practice in Abingdon, Va.  As his medical practice developed, Dr. Miller became increasingly concerned that medical schools had turned away from preparation of students for family practice in favor of other specializations, and in the late 1960s, Dr. Miller became the first family practitioner in modern times to be appointed to the faculty of the medical school.  He cofounded a division which later became the Department of Family Medicine, a postgraduate specialized program at the University of Virginia.  Because of Dr. Miller’s work, this program has directly affected the quality of life for thousands of Virginians.  He was later awarded the rank of professor emeritus at the University of Virginia.

For many years he has been a leader in his local community of Abingdon and been a lifelong friend to Tusculum College.  Over many years, he has been active on the board of the Highlands Festival and Craft Show and has served in many leadership roles since the early 1950s.

“He is a lover of jazz and a published poet. He was the inspiration for the Acts, Arts, Academia series at Tusculum College and has supported the program since its inception in the Fall of 2000,” said duBrisk.

In recognition of his distinguished career and his service to his Alma Mater, he received the Pioneer Award in 1994 and an honorary doctorate in 1998.

Jean Henard thanked the group for the award presented in honor of her husband who was a member of the Tusculum College Board of Trustees at the time of his death last spring.

henardDr. Henard was a member of the Tusculum College Board of Trustees from May 2005 until May 2008, and “distinguished himself as a physician, community leader, leader, College Trustee, donor, visionary, spokesman and lifelong supporter of education,” the citation read.  His associations with Tusculum College and the Greeneville/Greene County community continued a family tradition of support of education, community and family that included continued, unwavering support of Tusculum College.

Dr. Henard attended Marion Military Institute in Marion, Ala., Clemson University in South Carolina and the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. He served his country as a member of the United States Army. At the conclusion of his military service, Dr. Henard completed his undergraduate studies at East Tennessee State University in Johnson City and pursued his medical training at the University of Tennessee Medical School in Memphis.

Following medical school, Dr. Henard entered an orthopedic residency program at the renowned Campbell Clinic in Memphis. He then completed an additional specialty program in orthopedic hand surgery at the University of Iowa before returning to Memphis, where he entered private medical practice as an orthopedic surgeon. Upon retirement, he and his wife of 49 years, the former Jean Deaton, returned to Greene County.

An active member of Asbury United Methodist Church, Dr. Henard also participated in a number of Greeneville civic groups and other local organizations in the fields of government, economic development, education and health.  He was a supporter of the community through his membership and chairmanship of the Board of Directors of the Greene County Partnership and through the Greeneville-Greene County Airport Authority, of which he was chairman. He also served on the Laughlin Memorial Hospital Foundation, the Greeneville City Schools Foundation and was a member of the Board of Directors of the Niswonger Foundation.

He and Jean have one son, Dr. David Hal Henard, and one daughter, Dr. Deborah Henard MacFawn, and seven grandchildren.

The President’s Dinner is the College’s signature event and is hosted each spring by the Office of Institutional Advancement as a thank-you to the College’s major donors. This year’s event was held at Link Hills Country Club.

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Dr. Kent Keith receives honorary degree during Tusculum College’s spring commencement ceremonies

Posted on 20 May 2009 by eestes@tusculum.edu

Dr. Kent Keith, known internationally for his “Paradoxical Commandments,” received an honorary doctorate Saturday during Tusculum College’s commencement ceremonies.

Two hundred and seventy-five students received degrees during the two commencement ceremonies in Pioneer Arena. During the morning ceremony 24 students earned master of art degrees in education and 84 earned bachelor of science degrees in organizational management. In the afternoon service 167 students earned bachelor of arts degrees.

goldenpioneersDuring the afternoon ceremony, members of the Class of 1959 were recognized, as they are celebrating their 50th reunion year. Ten members of the class, dressed in golden robes and caps, led the procession of the graduating students into the arena. Prior to the ceremony, the class members were given a luncheon in their honor by the Office of Alumni and Parent Relations and presented with medallions to mark their milestone.

Dr. Keith was presented with an honorary doctorate of humane letters during the afternoon ceremony. He was selected for an honorary doctorate “in recognition of all these achievements, his work in the field of education and his dedicated service to mankind,” said Dr. Melinda Dukes, associate vice president of academic affairs.

A dynamic speaker and writer whose mission is to help people find personal meaning in a crazy world, Dr. Keith has earned international recognition for his “Paradoxical Commandments” which were part of a booklet for student leaders he wrote and published in 1968 as a college sophomore. His book became a national bestseller and has been translated into 17 languages.

keithThe book inspired three subsequent books related to the Paradoxical Commandments, which include: “Do It Anyway,” “Jesus Did It Anyway” and “Have Faith Anyway.” Dr. Keith is also the author of the “Universal Moral Code,” a set of fundamental moral principles that can be found throughout the world, and “The Case for Servant Leadership,” published in 2008. Tusculum College was honored to have Dr. Keith as a speaker on campus last year when he addressed servant leadership and its role in living a meaningful life as part of the Cicero Lecture Series of the College’s Acts, Arts, Academia 2008-09 performance and lecture series.

In 2007, Dr. Keith became chief executive officer of the Greenleaf Center, based in Indiana. The center is an international non-profit organization that promotes the understanding and practice of servant leadership through conferences, the publication of books and materials, sponsorship of speakers and seminars and the distribution of information and services for its members.

Prior to his service at the Greenleaf Center, Dr. Keith served as director of planning and economic development in the cabinet of the Governor of Hawaii; as project manager for the Mililani Technology Park in Hawaii; as president of Chaminade University, and as senior vice president for the YMCA of Honolulu. He was also an attorney in a private law firm.

Dr. Keith earned a bachelor’s degree in government from Harvard University, a master’s degree in philosophy and politics from Oxford University, a law degree from the University of Hawaii and a doctorate in education from University of Southern California. He is a Rhodes Scholar and has a certificate in Japanese from Waseda University. He has served on boards of schools and colleges, was a member of the Hawaii State Department of Education Task Force on Restructuring the Curriculum, served as a member of the Executive Committee of the Western College Association and has chaired college accreditation teams.

The graduates’ achievements are the focus of Tusculum’s commencement ceremonies, and four graduates were chosen by the faculty to make comments as representatives of their classmates.

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Speaking in the morning ceremony was Pamela Snyder of Morristown, who earned a bachelor of science degree in organizational management. Snyder asked her fellow graduates if they were ready to pass the test of the real world. “I hope that together we can pass the test of the real world – through persistence, attitude, setting goals and finding success.”

Karen Holweg of Morristown also spoke during the morning ceremony, representing her fellow classmates who earned master of art degrees in education. Holweg spoke of her experience as a student in the Graduate and Professional Studies (GPS) program and how she learned from others’ experiences — her professors and her classmates. She encouraged her fellow education graduates to use their new knowledge in their classrooms to enhance learning.

Speakers for the afternoon ceremony were Jeremiah Peterson of Unicoi, representing students from the traditional Residential College program, and Beth Weatherall of Morristown representing those students who earned bachelor of arts degrees in education, including those who earned degrees through the GPS program for working adults.

Peterson told his fellow graduates that commencement marked an opportunity for further growth, a new start and to accept new challenges.  “Growth happens when we step into the indefinite, and today, as we leave here, we are stepping into the indefinite,” he said.  “I mean, have you seen the news lately?  We must be brave.  Being brave does not mean feeling no fear, it means acting in the face of fear.  We cannot be static.  We must continue to learn and evolve.  So, it is my hope that each one of us will be courageous as we face the unknown and find continuous growth in our lives.”

Weatherall said she was “leaving Tusculum a new person, excited about the prospects ahead of me. The lessons I will hold most dear are the ones I hope you will embrace also, they are: be patient, be helpful, be available, strive to be the best, help students know they are winners, make learning fun and engaging, don’t be afraid to do the unconventional, be enthusiastic, be artistic, enjoy reading and teach your students to enjoy reading, be fair, and love children and let them love you.”

Dr. Stephen Weisz, college chaplain and associate professor of religious studies, delivered the baccalaureate sermon, “Where There is No Map” during both ceremonies. Dr. Weisz spoke of Abraham who was directed by God to go an unknown land. “Even if you are confident about your future, you will be called to march off your map,” he told the graduates, encouraging them to continue to have faith in God who is faithful and knows what lies ahead.

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Class of 2009 Senior Gift is sidewalk, dedicated in honor of Interim President Dr. Russell L. Nichols

Posted on 20 May 2009 by eestes@tusculum.edu

sidewalkA dedication ceremony was held May 7 for a new concrete walkway from Katherine Hall to Shiloh Road. The sidewalk was dedicated by members of the Class of 2009, who raised money for the project as their senior class gift.

The program was led by members of the Senior Class Gift Campaign Committee that identified the project as a gift they would like to complete and leave as a legacy for future Tusculum College students.  During the dedication, senior Megan Hart noted that the sidewalk was selected as a solution to students tracking mud into the residence hall and other campus buildings after using a dirt path the sidewalk replaced.

Senior Rachel Barnard explained that the students had chosen to make the gift to the College in honor for departing Interim President Dr. Russell L. Nichols for his service to the College and its students. New President Dr. Nancy B. Moody and Tusculum College Board of Trustee members Sam Doak and Jane Pilloni also thanked the students for their efforts during the brief ceremony.

Dr. Nichols cut a ribbon, held by members of the Senior Class Gift Campaign Committee, to officially open the sidewalk. The students also presented Dr. Nichols with a framed copy of the wording of a marker telling about the Class of 2009 gift and its dedication to him.

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Student Alumni Association cleans The Arch

Posted on 20 May 2009 by eestes@tusculum.edu

arch_cleanupThe Student Alumni Association spent the afternoon of May 1 cleaning the stone Arch at the entranceway of campus. Members scrubbed moss and other grime from the structure, which was built in 1917.

George Collins, director of the College’s Museum Program and Studies, provided the cleaning solution, formulated not to damage the historical structure that is one of the most recognizable symbols of Tusculum College. The funding for the solution was provided from a Community Enhancement Grant to the museum program from the State of Tennessee. Collins estimated that it was most likely the first time the Arch had been cleaned. The Arch was built in the patriotic fervor following World War I by locally renown stonemasons using material from the Tusculum Rock Quarry.

The Tusculum College Student Alumni Association is coordinated by the Department of Alumni and Parent Relations in the Office of Intuitional Advancement. Students are selected to participate in the program based on their academic work, involvement in campus activities and desire to give back to the College and the community. Members of the Tusculum College Student Alumni Association for 2008-09 are: Babb of Greeneville; Rachel Barnard of Loudon, Tenn.; Megan Hart of Loudon, Tenn.; Micah Haney of Union Grove, Ala.; Nikki Taylor of Ewing, Va.; Brooke Haymaker of Kettering, Ohio, and Glenn Vicary of Oak Ridge, Tenn.

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Adell Harris named new women’s basketball coach

Posted on 20 May 2009 by eestes@tusculum.edu

adellharrisAdell Harris has been named the new women’s basketball coach at Tusculum College announced Director of Athletics Frankie DeBusk at a press conference Tuesday afternoon (May 19) in the Niswonger Student Commons on the Greeneville, Tenn. campus.

Harris, a native of High Point, N.C., comes to Tusculum after serving the last six seasons on the coaching staff at NCAA Division I UNC Asheville, including the past two years as associate head coach.  As associate head coach, Harris was responsible for recruiting, pre and post-season conditioning, and opponent scouting. She worked with the UNCA guards both on and off the court with their skills and academic progress.

Harris replaces Missy Tiber, who stepped down last month after four years at Tusculum to take a similar position at NCAA I Southern Illinois University.

Harris helped guide UNC Asheville to four winning seasons, including a 21-12 record in the Bulldogs’ 2006-07 campaign, culminating in a Big South Conference Tournament title and a berth to the NCAA Tournament, both firsts in school history.  The Bulldogs tied a school single-season record for most conference wins (9), while posting the program’s first victory over an Atlantic Coast Conference opponent (58-53 win at Wake Forest).

In her first UNCA season, the Bulldogs posted a 19-9 record and finished second in the Big South Conference standings.  UNCA’s 19 victories were a 16-win improvement from a season before (3-25), earning the squad NCAA Most Improved Team in the Nation honors.

“As the search for a new coach began, we wanted to bring in a coach that could take our already successful women’s program to new heights,” said DeBusk.  “Coach Harris brings a passion for the game of basketball.  She is a quality person that brings in high morals and character.  She will work hard to graduate our players, but also make them understand the effort it takes to continue to be champions on the floor as well as in life.  Her energy and enthusiasm will bleed over into our players and will make all Tusculum fans, alumni and our community proud. I am very, very excited that Adell has decided to become a member of the Pioneer Family.”

Harris has mentored nine All-Big South Conference honorees, including two Conference Freshmen of the Year, Brittany Hendley (2004) and Kyla Jones (2007).

“Adell has been a very loyal and hard working assistant for us for six years,” said UNC Asheville head coach Betsy Blose. “She is ready to be a head coach. I am very happy for her. She has paid her dues and I know she will do a great job at Tusculum. We hate to see her go, but we wish her the very, very best.”

Harris played her collegiate career at Wake Forest University, where she was a four-year letterwinner for the Demon Deacons. During her senior campaign, she led Wake Forest with 108 assists and averaged 4.6 points per game, while also serving as team co-captain.  She wrapped up her career 10th on Wake’s all-time list with 241 career assists.

“I am very grateful to Frankie DeBusk for trusting me to lead the Tusculum women’s basketball program,” Harris said.  “I am both excited and anxious to serve Tusculum College, the Greeneville community and our student-athletes.  My goal is to continue to build on what currently exists, one the top 25 programs in the country.”

“I am extremely thankful to Betsy Blose for being the first person to believe in my abilities as a collegiate coach” added Harris.  “I am grateful for the opportunities that she has provided for me to grow professionally in her program.  My time at UNC Asheville has prepared me tremendously for this opportunity and for that I am greatly appreciative to the entire UNCA athletics department.”

Harris began her coaching career as an assistant coach at her prep alma mater T. Wingate Andrews High School in High Point during the 2002-03 campaign. She also served as head coach of the Piedmont X-Press AAU team from 1998-2003.  Harris has worked with numerous clinics and camps throughout the region.

The Tusculum women’s basketball program has accounted for four consecutive winning seasons.  The Pioneers have won back-to-back South Atlantic Conference titles and have made two straight trips to the NCAA Division II Tournament.

Tusculum College, located in Greeneville, Tenn., is affiliated with the Presbyterian Church, USA and is a NCAA Division II member of the South Atlantic Conference which is comprised of nine colleges and universities in Tennessee, North Carolina and South Carolina.

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Endowed scholarship established in honor of Tusculum College’s Dr. Russell L. Nichols

Posted on 20 May 2009 by srichey@tusculum.edu

Dr. Russell L. Nichols who has served as interim president of Tusculum College since August 2007, was pleasantly surprised as he was honored on Friday, May 15, at Tusculum College’s annual President’s Dinner, with the announcement that an endowed scholarship had been established on his behalf.

The scholarship will be designated for international travel and studies, a program Dr. Nichols has nurtured and supported during his time at the College.

“Dr. Russell L. Nichols has served as a steady hand in a time of transition for the College,” said Chairman of the Tusculum College Board of Trustees Dr. Ken Bowman. “His efforts and leadership have gone a long way in unifying the College. His calming, supporting and contributing nature has provided a contagious sense of optimism about the future of Tusculum College, at a time when it needed it most. ”

Bowman added that Dr. Nichols has been continually engaged with students, staff, faculty and the community, and his leadership has brought together the Tusculum College community in many ways and inspired a sense of collective direction and mission and a sense of optimism that was not here upon his arrival.

“The affection and respect for Dr. Nichols has been evident,” said Bowman. In the past few weeks, Dr. Nichols has been presented by the College faculty with a handmade rocking chair, as well as honored with a portrait from staff and faculty, which will hang in the Thomas J. Garland Library near the Center for Global Studies. A reception was held on campus and more than 150 people turned out with their well wishes for his future. And, he has been honored by the Class of 2009, who dedicated their Senior Gift in his honor – a new concrete walkway from Katherine Hall to Shiloh Road.

“It is with great pleasure that I announce the establishment of an endowed scholarship, named in honor of Dr. Russell L. Nichols, designated for international travel and studies, a program he has been and continues to be very passionate about, in the amount of  $18,590. The College is truly grateful to Dr. Nichols for his generous time and empathetic service and support, as well as his exceptional leadership to Tusculum College during his tenure as interim president.”

Dr. Nichols thanked the group and said that many of the friends he has made while at Tusculum College were some of the best of his life. He encouraged everyone to continue to work together and to appreciate the hard work and dedication that is prevalent among Tusculum College faculty, staff, alumni and friends.

The President’s Dinner is the College’s signature event and is hosted each spring by the Office of Institutional Advancement as a thank-you to the College’s major donors. This year’s event was held at Link Hills Country Club.

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Tusculum College’s Distinguished Service Award recipients are Dr. Sam Miller and the late Dr. Don Henard

Posted on 20 May 2009 by srichey@tusculum.edu

Two Distinguished Service Award recipients were honored on May 15 at Tusculum College’s annual President’s Dinner, held at Link Hills Country Club. Honored were Dr. Sam Miller and the late Dr. Don Henard. Henard’s award was presented to his wife, Jean Henard.

The 2009 awards were presented by Tusculum College President Nancy B. Moody. Assisting with the presentations were Marilyn duBrisk, director of the College’s Arts Outreach program, who read the citation presented to Dr. Miller; and Chairman of the Board of Trustees Dr. Ken Bowman, who read the citation presented to Mrs. Henard.

In his comments after receiving the honor, Miller focused on vision and how the Acts, Arts, Academia series and the restoration of Annie Hogan Byrd Fine Arts Building started with a small meeting of a few people who had a vision and followed it through.  He encouraged the more than 150 attendees to keep following their vision for the future of Tusculum College.miller_awardcut

Dr. Miller, a member of the Tusculum College Class of 1935, is “an alumnus, physician, poet, educator, patron of the arts, visionary and servant leader,” the citation read.  His associations with Tusculum College include the lifelong ties made among the six members of his immediate family who have attended Tusculum College.  Dr. Miller has established a pattern of positive involvement in college, community and family that he has carried on since his student days at Tusculum College.

Dr. Miller graduated from the University of Virginia Medical School in 1950 and began a family practice in Abingdon, Va.  As his medical practice developed, Dr. Miller became increasingly concerned that medical schools had turned away from preparation of students for family practice in favor of other specializations, and in the late 1960s, Dr. Miller became the first family practitioner in modern times to be appointed to the faculty of the medical school.  He cofounded a division which later became the Department of Family Medicine, a postgraduate specialized program at the University of Virginia.  Because of Dr. Miller’s work, this program has directly affected the quality of life for thousands of Virginians.  He was later awarded the rank of professor emeritus at the University of Virginia.

For many years he has been a leader in his local community of Abingdon and been a lifelong friend to Tusculum College.  Over many years, he has been active on the board of the Highlands Festival and Craft Show and has served in many leadership roles since the early 1950s.

“He is a lover of jazz and a published poet. He was the inspiration for the Acts, Arts, Academia series at Tusculum College and has supported the program since its inception in the Fall of 2000,” said duBrisk.

In recognition of his distinguished career and his service to his Alma Mater, he received the Pioneer Award in 1994 and an honorary doctorate in 1998.

Jean Henard thanked the group for the award presented in honor of her husband who was a member of the Tusculum College Board of Trustees at the time of his death last spring.

henard_awardcutDr. Henard was a member of the Tusculum College Board of Trustees from May 2005 until May 2008, and “distinguished himself as a physician, community leader, leader, College Trustee, donor, visionary, spokesman and lifelong supporter of education,” the citation read.  His associations with Tusculum College and the Greeneville/Greene County community continued a family tradition of support of education, community and family that included continued, unwavering support of Tusculum College.

Dr. Henard attended Marion Military Institute in Marion, Ala., Clemson University in South Carolina and the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. He served his country as a member of the United States Army. At the conclusion of his military service, Dr. Henard completed his undergraduate studies at East Tennessee State University in Johnson City and pursued his medical training at the University of Tennessee Medical School in Memphis.

Following medical school, Dr. Henard entered an orthopedic residency program at the renowned Campbell Clinic in Memphis. He then completed an additional specialty program in orthopedic hand surgery at the University of Iowa before returning to Memphis, where he entered private medical practice as an orthopedic surgeon. Upon retirement, he and his wife of 49 years, the former Jean Deaton, returned to Greene County.

An active member of Asbury United Methodist Church, Dr. Henard also participated in a number of Greeneville civic groups and other local organizations in the fields of government, economic development, education and health.  He was a supporter of the community through his membership and chairmanship of the Board of Directors of the Greene County Partnership and through the Greeneville-Greene County Airport Authority, of which he was chairman. He also served on the Laughlin Memorial Hospital Foundation, the Greeneville City Schools Foundation and was a member of the Board of Directors of the Niswonger Foundation.

He and Jean have one son, Dr. David Hal Henard, and one daughter, Dr. Deborah Henard MacFawn, and seven grandchildren.

The President’s Dinner is the College’s signature event and is hosted each spring by the Office of Institutional Advancement as a thank-you to the College’s major donors. This year’s event was held at Link Hills Country Club.

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