Archive | October, 2011

Literary and art works by Tusculum professors to be featured in Nov. 1 event at Allison Gallery

Literary and art works by Tusculum professors to be featured in Nov. 1 event at Allison Gallery

Posted on 28 October 2011 by eestes@tusculum.edu

An Auguring,” an exhibit by Aurora Pope, assistant professor of art at Tusculum, is on display through Nov. 4 at the Allison Gallery.

The works of two English professors and an art professor at Tusculum College will be featured in an event Tuesday, Nov. 1, at Tusculum College’s Allison Gallery.

Tusculum’s Humanities Division is presenting a Faculty Spotlight that will begin at 4 p.m. on the lawn of the Rankin House with readings by English professors Dr. Clay Matthews and Jan Matthews and then continue with a reception to mark the opening of a new exhibit in the Allison Gallery by Aurora Pope, assistant professor of art.

The Rankin House houses the Allison Gallery and is located to the rear of the parking area beside Three Blind Mice on Erwin Highway. The gallery is open from 4 -7 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Dr. Clay Matthews, assistant professor of English, will be reading works of his poetry. He is the author of two books, “RUNOFF” and “Superfecta” and has had poems published in more than 50 literary journals, including The American Poetry Review, Black Warrior Review, The Brooklyn Review, New Orleans Review, Pilot, RealPoeti and Verse Daily.

He has earned numerous honors for creative writing, including winning the the Academy of American Poets Prize in 2005 and the Marye Lynn Cummings Endowed Scholarship at Oklahoma State University in 2006. In addition to teaching at Tusculum, Dr. Matthews has taught at East Tennessee State University, Southeast Missouri State University and Oklahoma State. He earned a doctorate in English from Oklahoma State and master’s and bachelor’s degrees in English from Southeast Missouri State.

Jan Matthews, assistant professor of English, will be reading works of nonfiction. She joined the Tusculum faculty in the English Department this year. She has had numerous works of fiction and poetry published in various magazines and journals including the Tusculum Review. Matthews has received her Master of Fine Arts in creative writing as well as a Bachelor of Arts in English with honors from Southern Illinois University.

Following the readings, there will be a reception for Pope in the Allison Gallery. Pope’s exhibit, “An Auguring” will be on display through Friday, Nov. 4. In her artist statement about the exhibit, Pope notes that an auguring is an event that tells the future and the word “augur” is associated with the Latin word for bird, “avis,” as the activities of birds were believed to herald what was to come. In ancient Rome, an augur was the interpreter of omens. This idea inspired Pope to think about the need for time to stand still for moving events to be discerned, a “time in between time” that “lends itself beautifully to the picture plane” that captures a moment and sets the stage for an auguring.

Pope joined the Tusculum faculty full-time this year after spending time teaching as an adjunct professor both at Tusculum and at ETSU. She received a Master in Fine Arts in Studio Painting from ETSU, and Artium Baccalaureatus in Anthropology from the University of Georgia.

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Tusculum College creative writing students find success outside the classroom

Tusculum College creative writing students find success outside the classroom

Posted on 28 October 2011 by srichey@tusculum.edu

Several of Tusculum College’s students from the English Department have found success outside the classroom as they continue their creative work and expand their employment and future educational opportunities through internships.

“Tusculum College’s English Department strives hard to lay the groundwork for our students to find success with their creative works through publication, as well as to help them prepare for graduate studies if they wish to do so,” said Heather Patterson, English Department chair and assistant professor of English.

“We are very proud that our students have found opportunities to shine outside the classroom.”

Danielle Armstrong, a senior from Blountville, Tenn., participated in the Ronald McNair Post Baccalaureate Achievement Program Summer Pre-Research Internship at East Tennessee State University.

The internship is specifically need-based and offered to first-generation college students wishing to pursue a PhD. in any field. The internship offers qualitative research methodology with the goal of creating a research proposal, as well as providing help with graduate school admission requirements, and graduate program entrance exam preparation.

Heather Blanton, a senior from Lincolnton, N.C., completed an internship with “The Laurel of Asheville,” an arts and culture magazine. Her work included working with the print editions, as well as writing two articles a month for the online edition.

Andrew Baker, a junior from Athens, Tenn., was published in “Novelltum,” an online literary journal. His poem “Koi” was in the spring issue, and “Home,” a photograph by Baker, is also being published in another literary journal, “Adriot.”

Britany Menken, a junior from Maryville, Tenn., had an essay published in “Novelltum,” as well. The essay was titled “My Children” and was about her two nieces. She also had a book, “Cloud 0,” published by Xlibris. The book is available in book stores and online through Barnes and Noble.

 

Reporting by Noelle Rankin ‘ 13

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Tusculum College competes in ‘Blood Drive Bowl’ against Carson-Newman

Posted on 27 October 2011 by srichey@tusculum.edu

Fans of the Tusculum Pioneers and Carson-Newman Eagles can support their team while aiding the East Tennessee Medic Regional Blood Center by participating in the Ninth Annual Blood Drive Bowl next week.

The event is part of the festivities leading up to next Saturday’s football game between the Pioneers and Eagles that kicks off at 1 p.m. from Burke-Tarr Stadium in Jefferson City on Nov. 5. There will be several opportunities to donate blood.

Tusculum holds the title of Blood Drive Bowl winner from last season after claiming the victory by a 51–unit margin. And Tusculum College, with the help of the community, is ready to take home the title again. Tusculum has been the top donor in five of the previous eight drives, including the last three in a row.

On Wednesday, Nov. 2, Tusculum students, faculty, staff and fans may donate on the Greeneville campus at the Niswonger Commons from 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.

Blood donations will also be taken at the following locations: Tuesday (Nov. 1) at the Tusculum College – Morristown site (420 West Morris Blvd.) from 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.; and Thursday (Nov. 3) at the Greeneville Wal-Mart (3755 Andrew Johnson Hwy.) from 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.

Blood donations may also be given during the week at the MEDIC Regional Blood Center in Knoxville (1601 Ailor Ave.) during the following hours: Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 6:30 p.m. Please let the screener know the donation should count towards Tusculum College.

“This is annual tradition that really meets a need in our region,” said Valisa Griffin, coordinator of the Tusculum Fund for Tusculum College.  “It doesn’t take much to punch up the rivalry with Carson-Newman, but with the Blood Drive Bowl, the communities are the real winners.”

A tee-shirt will be provided to all donors, along with refreshments on the site. Donors should bring a valid driver’s license or other official photo ID in order to give blood. Medical prescreening and a free cholesterol test (no fasting necessary) will be provided at the sites. One donation a year exempts donors and their IRS dependents from paying blood supplier processing fees at any U.S. hospital.

The winning school will be announced at halftime of the Nov. 5 football game. Tusculum leads the series 5-3. The Pioneers won the inaugural title in 2003, again in 2005 and in each of the last three years (2008, 2009, 2010). Carson-Newman has captured bragging rights three times (2004, 2006, 2007).

For more information, contact the MEDIC Regional Blood Center at (865) 524-3074 or at www.medicblood.com.

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Book signing Nov. 1 in Tusculum College Bookstore by GPS student who has written children’s book

Posted on 27 October 2011 by srichey@tusculum.edu

Amanda Rose Holt, a student in Tusculum’s Graduate and Professional Studies program, will sign her new book, “First Flight,” in the Tusculum College Bookstore on Tuesday, Nov. 1, from 3 – 5:30 p.m.

“First Flight,” which is Holt’s first book, is available at the Bookstore. Holt has had readings of the book at elementary schools in Jefferson and Cocke. Her book has also earned her mentions in regional newspapers.

The book is about a baby barn owl who is about to take his first flight, but becomes a little scared to take the big leap on his own. With some encouragement from his mother, he gains confidence and gives it his best try. Succeeding in flight, the young owl discovers he loves flying and begins to soar with the knowledge that he can do anything on his own.

Written in a rhyming style, Holt was inspired by her oldest son’s experiences in starting school as she wrote the book. She has always enjoyed writing, but with three small children, it has been a challenge to find time to do so. However, she was prompted in a Children’s Literature class to write a book. “But, I took it a step further and liked it so much that I had it published,” she said.

Holt has already written a sequel to “First Flight” entitled “New Home.”  She is currently illustrating the book and hopes to have it published by next Christmas.

“This is something I really enjoy and plan to do it for a long time,” Holt says.

She is a student in Tusculum’s undergraduate human growth and learning, K-6 elementary education program and attends class at Tusculum’s Morristown center. She will being student teaching in January and plans to graduate in May 2012.

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Fall phonathon has begun

Posted on 27 October 2011 by eestes@tusculum.edu

Tusculum College’s fall phonathon has begun, and a current student may be calling you soon about supporting your Alma Mater.

Students will be calling on selected days for the remainder of this month, November and December. The phonathon is one of the ways that the College seeks support for the Tusculum Fund, which  is the primary fund through which alumni and friends provide unrestricted support to the College that allows Tusculum to use the funds where they are most urgently needed while at the same time supplementing the overall operating budget.

This support benefits current students in continuing to reach their educational goals and serves as a benchmark of the involvement of our alumni with their Alma Mater for funding decisions made by foundations and corporations.

Areas of the Tusculum Fund include scholarships, academic programs, technology, the library, Pioneer Club (athletics) and area sof greatest need.

Every gift to the Tusculum Fund matters. Participation in the Tusculum Fund, no matter the size of the gift, is viewed as a measure of alumni satisfaction, demonstrating alumni loyalty, which influences the  College’s ability to secure grants from corporations and foundations.

Gifts of ANY and ALL sizes from alumni, parents and friends of the College are critical to Tusculum’s current and future success as a renown liberal arts college. Colleges that achieve a higher percent in alumni giving participation are, in general, more highly respected and receive more funding opportunities.

If you receive a call, please consider a gift to the Tusculum. Whether or not your give a gift, we encourage you to talk to the caller about his or her experiences at Tusculum and share your experiences at the College. The students enjoy hearing alumni stories about their days at Tusculum, and it encourages them as they make calls.

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Make plans to attend upcoming events in East Tennessee

Make plans to attend upcoming events in East Tennessee

Posted on 26 October 2011 by eestes@tusculum.edu

This group of alumni from the 1980s enjoyed a weekend on campus and the tailgate prior to the October 15 football game. Upcoming alumni events provide an opportunity for you and your classmates to gather together.

Four alumni events are planned in the coming months.

The first event will be this Saturday, October 29.  Tusculum alumni, parents and friends are invited to enjoy a pre-game social prior to cheering on the Pioneers during a men’s basketball exhibition game at East Tennessee State University. The pre-game social will begin at 2 p.m. in the East Auxiliary Gum inside the Memorial Center (Mini-Dome) on the ETSU campus.  Attendees should use the Northwest entrance of the Mini-Dome) and are encouraged to park in the lots near the tennis courts.

The next event will be the following Saturday, November 5. Tusculum alumni, parents and friends are invited to enjoy a tailgate party prior to a football game against the arch-rival Eagles at Carson-Newman College.

The tailgate party will be at 11:30 a.m. in the gravel parking lot on Davis Street (the south end of Burke-Tarr Stadium). The kickoff to the game is at 1 p.m.

The cost is $8 per person with reservations by October 28. $12 per person after October 28.

Attendees can park in the visitor parking area along  Davis Street. Bring a chair and wear your favorite  Tusculum attire.

To register, please call the Office of Alumni  Relations at  423.636.7303 or 1.800.729.0259  ext. 5303, email alumni@tusculum.edu or you can register online at www.tusculum.edu/alumni.

The next two events are for alumni in Knoxville and Greeneville. The Knoxville event will be the launch of the Alumni Career Services Network for that region. The event will be Thursday, December 1. The Greeneville event will be on Tuesday, December 13. Mark your calendar now to attend these events.

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Tusculum enrolling students for new psychology program, moving ahead in adding nursing program

Tusculum enrolling students for new psychology program, moving ahead in adding nursing program

Posted on 26 October 2011 by eestes@tusculum.edu

Tusculum College continues to add new programs to meet the needs of its students and the surrounding community.

 

Students are being enrolled in a new psychology degree with a concentration in behavioral health in the Graduate and Professional Studies program for working adults, and the College is moving ahead in the process of adding a new degree program in nursing.

 

New psychology program

The new program is designed to address the needs of the region’s adult learner, as well as those of the region’s employers. The program, which will be offered during evenings and an occasional weekend, will offer students the opportunity to earn a bachelor’s degree in psychology with a behavioral health focus.

“Most students choose to major in psychology because they want to be involved in directly helping others. This program is designed to give them the background and skills to do just that,” explained Dr. Jennifer Harper, assistant professor of psychology at Tusculum.

According to Harper, the unique behavioral health focus will enable adults to acquire the practical skill-set required in human services work.

Dr. Bill Garris, assistant professor of psychology, added, “Students will learn about and practice diagnosis and case management, work through issues of professional ethics, address substance abuse and role play with basic counseling techniques,” she said. “It will be a very practical education designed to meet needs of area providers and won’t bog students down with multiple courses in research.”

Classes will be scheduled conveniently in the evening, and students will take just one course at a time. Additionally, students will learn from faculty who have been both educated at the nation’s leading universities and have real-world counseling experience.

“We are excited to be able to offer this curriculum to East Tennessee,” said Dr. Brian Pope, professor of psychology and chair of the psychology department.

“A program in behavioral health, with this level of rigor, a schedule that is convenient for working adults and a civic arts curriculum designed to help adults be agents of change in their communities is unique to this region,” said Pope.

According to Pope, the new psychology program will work well for the adult who is involved in, or would like to transition into, human services work. Human services is a broad category of support professionals who work with youth in afterschool programs, adults with disabilities, adult daycares and group homes, the judicial system and serve as case managers for the department of social services and our local mental health providers.

According to the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics, the demand for human service workers is expected to increase 23 percent between 2008 and 2018, which is greater than the average growth for all occupations. This growth will occur because of the aging population, but there will also be increasing needs for mental health treatment and drug abuse prevention and treatment. Demand will be greater in rural areas, such as regions in East Tennessee.

Students will progress through the curriculum as a cohort, with the first Knoxville group already underway. The Morristown cohort is currently enrolling. The group will meet on Mondays beginning November 7.

The same curriculum will be offered in Greeneville beginning in January with an additional group beginning in the Tri-Cities region in April.

Anyone interested in earning their Bachelor of Arts in psychology with a behavioral health concentration should contact Graduate and Professional Studies at 888-488-7285 for more information or to register or visit www.tusculum.edu/adult.

Addition of nursing program

Tusculum College President Nancy B. Moody and other key leaders from the college appeared before the Tennessee Board of Nursing in Nashville, Tenn., on Wednesday, October 5, to present a letter of intent, on behalf of Tusculum College, to establish a Bachelor of Science in nursing degree program.

The letter of intent received approval from the Board of Nursing.

The presentation included elements such as the school’s accreditation through the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) since 1927 and degree granting approval through the Tennessee Higher Education Commission. The group also presented information on program approval and support from the faculty and board, plans to seek programmatic accreditation and funding allocated by action of the Board of Trustees for the program.

Also attending the presentation were Dr. Melinda Dukes, interim vice president of academic affairs, Steve Gehret, vice president and chief financial officer, and Dr. Greg Hawkins, assistant vice president of academic affairs.

The presentation to the Board of Nursing also included information from the feasibility study conducted by the college for the nursing program, which showed a number of local and national factors supportive of Tusculum College providing undergraduate students the opportunity to complete an undergraduate nursing degree either as first-time freshmen or as registered nurses seeking to complete a bachelor’s degree. Prospective student data collected via Tusculum College’s Office of Enrollment Management documented that the number of students considering Tusculum who are also seeking a nursing degree have tripled since 2009.

According to Moody, the next step in the process is the submission of an application for initial approval to the Tennessee Board of Nursing in February. Advertisement of the program and recruitment of students will not occur until that time.

The college anticipates offering the nursing program to students effective August 2012; however, the proposed degree program is contingent upon the approval of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges and the Tennessee Board of Nursing.

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Film, stage, art and literature to be celebrated in upcoming events at Tusculum

Film, stage, art and literature to be celebrated in upcoming events at Tusculum

Posted on 26 October 2011 by eestes@tusculum.edu

Marco the Magnificent (Russ Crum) charms Lili in this early scene from “Carnival!”

The calendar for the coming month at Tusculum College is full of events showcasing the talents of those on campus as well as those in the community.

On tap are an independent film festival, a Theatre-at-Tusculum production, poetry readings by faculty and an art exhibition by a professor.

Southern Appalachian International Film Festival 2011

“Southern Appalachian International Film Festival 2011: Hidden in the Mountains” will be home again when the festival returns to Tusculum College for its sixth annual event, beginning with opening ceremonies Wednesday, October 26 and concluding Sunday, October 30.

The Southern Appalachian International Film Festival began with the idea to revive the Sinking Creek Film Festival, originally founded by the late Mary Jane Coleman of Greeneville and held at Tusculum College until the festival moved to Nashville and became the still-successful Nashville Film Festival.

 

Scheduled events include festival screenings comprised of 100 features and short films from all over the world, and a special Opening Night Gala: The “Mary Jane Coleman Legacy Celebration,” which will incorporate an awards ceremony for the festival winners and a very moving presentation of two commissioned portraits of fallen soldiers which will be given to their families by artist Kaziah Hancock.

 

Hancock began “Project Compassion,” where families of fallen soldiers in the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts submit a request accompanied by a photo and a team of artists then produces a painted portrait of the soldier killed in action to send to the family. Hancock’s documentary, “Kaziah the Goat Woman,” separate from “Project Compassion,” will be screened as part of Southern Appalachian International Film Festival 2011: Hidden in the Mountains on Friday, October 28, at 4 p.m.

 

Filmmaker Shelley Rogers, a Greeneville native, will have a screening of her environmental film, “What’s ‘Organic’ About Organic?,” which is also nominated as one of the top submissions in the festival. Rogers traveled around the country exploring what goes into the making of organic products.

 

The film takes advantage of the farmers’ good humor as they explain what “growing organic” really means and focuses on these farm families and their connection to the land, making theirs a personal fight to stay afloat while competing against mega-farms in other states. Rogers’ film will screen on Saturday, October 29, at 12:30 p.m.

Rounding out the diversity of Southern Appalachian International Film Festival 2011: Hidden in the Mountains is “Hollywood to Dollywood,” a documentary film about twin brothers, raised in the South but now living in Los Angeles, who decide to drive across country and present Dolly Parton with the script they have written for her, during Dollywood’s 25th Anniversary Celebration. “Hollywood to Dollywood” will screen Friday, October 28 at 5:15 p.m. and again on Sunday, October 30 at 4 p.m.

Films scheduled for this year’s event include five horror films, three independent films, seven Appalachian-themed films, eight films with sexuality themes, eight women’s films, eight art/experimental films, eight environmental films, 14 foreign language films, 14 documentaries, seven short films and eight student films.

All screenings, as well as the Opening Night Gala are free and open to the public. The gala will begin at 6 p.m. and will be held in Chalmers Conference Center. Screenings begin at 11 a.m. on Thursday, running to 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday screenings run from 11 a.m. – 10 p.m. Sunday screenings begin at noon and will conclude by 8 p.m.

 

The festival will be held in several locations on campus, including The Hurley Room in the Niswonger Commons and Rooms 213 and 202 in the Charles Oliver Gray North building. For specific location information, movie trailers and a complete list of films to be screened or for further information please visit the festival website at www.soapiff.com <http://www.soapiff.com>, or call Festival Director Amelia Fry at (423) 943-8295, or Festival Coordinator Bridget Chandley at (423) 361-3370.

 

The purpose of Southern Appalachian International Film Festival 2011: Hidden in the Mountains is to publicly recognize, promote and preserve the work of independent filmmakers and encourage film production and film culture in Southern Appalachia.

Poetry Reading, Art Exhibition

The Humanities Division will be presenting this year’s Faculty Spotlight, featuring an art exhibition by Aurora Pope, a poetry reading by Clay Matthews, and a nonfiction reading by Jan Matthews.

The event is Tuesday, November 1, at 4 p.m. on the Rankin House lawn and in the Clem Allison Gallery. It is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be provided.

Clay Matthews and  Jan Matthews are members of the English faculty and Pope is a member of the art faculty. Pope’s art exhibition will be on display in the Allison Gallery through November 4, and student exhibitions will be featured in the Allison Gallery through the end of the year.

Carnival!

Theatre-at-Tusculum will bring the splendor, magic and romance of “Carnival!” to the stage in November.

The musical, which tells the romantic and heartwarming story of the orphan Lili in the colorful, exciting world of a traveling carnival, will be performed at 7 p.m. Nov. 4-5 and 11-12 and at 2 p.m. on Nov. 6 and 13 in the auditorium of the Annie Hogan Byrd Fine Arts Building on the Tusculum College campus.

A talented cast of 81 brings the tale of Lili to life as she joins a traveling carnival and finds herself surrounded by a company of fantastically colorful personalities, such as Paul, the handsome, but bitter puppeteer; the dynamic magician Marco the Magnificent; kind Jacquot, Paul’s patient partner, and the incomparable and fiery Roalie. They are surrounded by a kaleidoscope of carnival characters and creatures, clowns, gypsies, mystics and tumblers and dancers, who are all manipulated by the artful ringmaster B. F. Shlegel.

Adding to the carnival atmosphere are a charming unicorn, played by a miniature horse named Junebug, an adorable dancing dog, some other animal surprises and four charming and hilarious puppets, creations of Greeneville artist Judith Plucker.

Guest artist and renowned vocalist Russ Crum has been providing his expertise to the cast that includes some local favorites and some newcomers. Crum is portraying Marco; golden-throated Sterling Bean is taking on the role of Paul; Emily Bryant, who many will remember in her role as Dorothy in the 2008 production of the “Wizard of Oz,”  portrays Lili, and exciting newcomer Audrey Shoemaker has taken on the role of Rosalie. Theatre-at-Tusculum favorites Tom Sizemore and Seth Holt return as Jacquot and B.F. Shlegel, respectively.

This musical will also feature a breathtaking dance performance. Lori Ann Sparks, creative director of Central Ballet Theatre of Greeneville, and the show’s choreographer Kim Berry will be performing a dramatic and beautiful routine using on aerial silks.

Theatre-at-Tusculum’s production staff has been weaving its magic to make the world of the carnival come to life on stage. Costume Director Barbara Holt is using every bit of glitter and glitz from the Arts Outreach Costume Shop to create eye-catching, colorful costumes with her army of volunteers. A special team of volunteers will transform the Carnival players with “Cirque du Paris” face paints. Music Director Angie Clendenon, assisted this year by Tusculum student Josh Davis, has assembled a professional pit orchestra, and Technical Director Frank Mengel has designed a colorful set. Gifted choreographer Kim Berry rounds out the team and a host of dedicated volunteers drill, hammer, sew, paint, pin, glue and prompt to ensure the show’s success.

Director Marilyn duBrisk and Arts Outreach Coordinator Jennifer Hollowell are expecting large audiences, so early ticket reservations are encouraged. Tickets are $12 for adults, $10 for seniors 60 and over and $5 for children 12 and under. Reservations can be made by calling 423-798-1620 or by emailing jhollowell@tusculum.edu.

 

 

 

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Tusculum named ‘Military Friendly School’ for second year

Tusculum named ‘Military Friendly School’ for second year

Posted on 26 October 2011 by eestes@tusculum.edu

Tusculum College has for the second year been named to G.I. Jobs’ 2011 list of Military Friendly Schools. The list honors the top 15 percent of colleges, universities and trade schools that are doing the most to embrace America’s veterans as students.

 

Schools on the list range from state universities and private colleges to community colleges and trade schools. The common bond is their shared priority of recruiting students with military experience.

 

“Tusculum College has a long history of providing programs that allow the adult student to be able to achieve their dream of higher education while balancing the responsibilities of career and family,” said Dr. Tom Stein, vice president for enrollment management at Tusculum College.

 

“The Military Friendly Schools list is a key resource in letting veterans know which schools will offer them the greatest opportunity, flexibility and overall experience. It’s especially important now with so many schools competing for military students,” said Stein.

 

Schools on the Military Friendly Schools list also offer additional benefits to student veterans such as on-campus veterans programs, credit for service, military spouse programs and more.

 

Tusculum College started the Yellow Ribbon program in August 2009. Under the program, the school matches dollars put in by the Veterans Administration so veterans can work toward their advanced degree as well as qualify for money to help with housing. There are already more than 20 students enrolled in Tusculum degree programs who are receiving the Yellow Ribbon benefits.

 

“The Yellow Ribbon program allows the college to further fulfill her mission by acknowledging the service and commitment of those who have served our country by providing them with financial support to complete their education.” said Tusculum College President Nancy B. Moody. “With the variety of locations, programs, majors, degrees and scheduling options offered at Tusculum College, we are uniquely suited to serve those whose educational path was interrupted or who are considering beginning or continuing their higher education.”

 

The Yellow Ribbon program is applicable towards all Tusculum College degree programs, which include traditional undergraduate programs, as well as the Graduate and Professional Studies programs. Tuition benefits under the program are also available to both full and part-time students.

 

In addition, Tusculum College has a long standing relationship with United States Navy through its partnership with the U.S.S. Greeneville submarine. Since its christening, Tusculum College has partnered with the crew members, offering an annual scholarship to crewmen and/or members of their family. To date, three people benefiting from that relationship have become Tusculum College alumni and one enrolled this year as a freshman on the Residential campus.

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Learn the lastest about your fellow alumni

Learn the lastest about your fellow alumni

Posted on 26 October 2011 by eestes@tusculum.edu


 

 

 

’00s

Josh Edens ’08 of Jonesborough, TN, was named “Tennessee Titans High School Coach of the Week” for the week of October 17. Edens is the head coach of the North Greene High School Huskies football team. The award includes a $1,000 contribution to the North Greene football program and Josh will be a guest at the December 11 Titans game with the other recipients of the award. He is eligible for the “Tennessee Titans Coach of the Year” award, which will be announced on December 11. Josh is in his second year as head coach at North Greene and his team has earned a playoff berth for the postseason. The criterion for selection includes the coach’s impact on his team, school and community.  A statewide media panel votes each week to determine the weekly winner.  All high school football coaches in Tennessee, regardless of their school’s size, league, or division, are eligible to be selected each week.  The program is designed to recognize high school coaches who transform, through their hard work and dedication, student-athletes into the best possible football players and citizens in their community.

 

 

’50s

John B. Adcock ’59 of Winchester, TN, passed away July 29, 2011. Mr. Adcock was born on Easter Sunday and was nicknamed “Bunny” because of his birth date. This nickname stuck with him through his years at Tusculum, where he was well liked and respected. Family members continued to use the nickname throughout his life. Mr. Adcock was a civilian electrical engineer for 34 years at the Newark Air Force Base in Ohio. Upon retiring, he returned to his beloved Tennessee and took a position with the Arnold Engineering Company, where he was able to use his highly specialized skills obtained over the course of his career. Mr. Adcock was a member of the First United Methodist Church of Winchester and a member of the Masonic Order. He was known for his devotion to his family and his life-long love for automobiles and boating.

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Relish Cooking Show and Expo to be held at Tusculum College on Nov. 3

Posted on 25 October 2011 by srichey@tusculum.edu

The Relish Cooking Show & Expo is coming to Greene County on Thursday, November 3. The show begins at 5 p.m.

The nationally-renowned event stars celebrity chef Jon Ashton, executive chef for “Relish” magazine, and will be held in the Pioneer Arena at Tusculum College. The show and expo are sponsored by The Greeneville Sun, The Newport Plain Talk and The Rogersville Review.

The Relish Cooking Show brings “Relish,” the nation’s largest food magazine, to life in cities across the country. The two-hour cooking show is a glimpse inside the Relish kitchen, providing cooking techniques to help home cooks get dinner on the table with ease.

Participants will learn how to sauté, dredge, toss, fold and whip with Ashton, who will teach audience members how to cook with confidence, while bringing a sense of humor to the table.

The entertaining two-hour cooking show, combined with a local business expo and VIP Backstage Party, is an evening of great entertainment. It is an event designed for anyone who cooks, wants to cook better or just eats.

Participants will be eligible to win an assortment of prizes, courtesy of local and national sponsors and will receive a fully-loaded goodie bag that includes a special 50-page “Relish” keepsake cookbook, coupons and samples.

Chef Ashton graduated from St. Helens College in the United Kingdom in 1994 and worked in several notable restaurants, including the Derby Lodge Hotel’s French restaurant, and as a sous chef at The Kirkfield Hotel’s restaurant. After moving to the United States, he took a position as the regular midday chef at Orlando’s FOX affiliate station and appeared on “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” a year later. He regularly appears on the “Today Show” and is currently the food correspondent for the nationally syndicated morning show “The Daily Buzz,” broadcast to more than 160 stations.

Tickets are $10 which includes a tour of local vendor booths, as well as a cooking demonstration from 7-9:45 p.m. Children 12 and under admitted free. VIP tickets are available for $30 and will include admission to the show, a backstage party and a meet-and-greet with Relish staff members.

Advance tickets are available at The Greeneville Sun or online at greenevillesun.com/relishshow2011. For additional ticket information, call 423-638-4185.

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International Film Festival set for Tusculum College, October 26-30

Posted on 24 October 2011 by srichey@tusculum.edu

“Southern Appalachian International Film Festival 2011:  Hidden in the Mountains” will be home again when the festival returns to Tusculum College for its sixth annual event, beginning with opening ceremonies Wednesday, October 26 and concluding Sunday, October 30.

The Southern Appalachian International Film Festival began with the idea to revive the Sinking Creek Film Festival, originally founded by the late Mary Jane Coleman of Greeneville and held at Tusculum College until the festival moved to Nashville and became the still-successful Nashville Film Festival.

Scheduled events include festival screenings comprised of 100 features and short films from all over the world, and a special Opening Night Gala: The “Mary Jane Coleman Legacy Celebration,” which will incorporate an awards ceremony for the festival winners and a very moving presentation of two commissioned portraits of fallen soldiers which will be given to their families by artist Kaziah Hancock.

Hancock began “Project Compassion,” where families of fallen soldiers in the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts submit a request accompanied by a photo and a team of artists then produces a painted portrait of the soldier killed in action to send to the family. Hancock’s documentary, “Kaziah the Goat Woman,” separate from “Project Compassion,” will be screened as part of Southern Appalachian International Film Festival 2011:  Hidden in the Mountains on Friday, October 28, at 4 p.m.

Filmmaker Shelley Rogers, a Greeneville native, will have a screening of her environmental film, “What’s ‘Organic’ About Organic?,” which is also nominated as one of the top submissions in the festival. Rogers traveled around the country exploring what goes into the making of organic products.

The film takes advantage of the farmers’ good humor as they explain what “growing organic” really means and focuses on these farm families and their connection to the land, making theirs a personal fight to stay afloat while competing against mega-farms in other states. Rogers’ film will screen on Saturday, October 29, at 12:30 p.m.

Rounding out the diversity of Southern Appalachian International Film Festival 2011:  Hidden in the Mountains is “Hollywood to Dollywood,” a documentary film about twin brothers, raised in the South but now living in Los Angeles, who decide to drive across country and present Dolly Parton with the script they have written for her, during Dollywood’s 25th Anniversary Celebration. “Hollywood to Dollywood” will screen Friday, October 28 at 5:15 p.m. and again on Sunday, October 30 at 4 p.m.

Films scheduled for this year’s event include five horror films, three independent films, seven Appalachian-themed films, eight films with sexuality themes, eight women’s films, eight art/experimental films, eight environmental films, 14 foreign language films, 14 documentaries, seven short films and eight student films.

All screenings, as well as the Opening Night Gala are free and open to the public. The gala will begin at 6 p.m. and will be held in Chalmers Conference Center. Screenings begin at 11 a.m. on Thursday, running to 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday screenings run from 11 a.m. – 10 p.m. Sunday screenings begin at noon and will conclude by 8 p.m.

The festival will be held in several locations on campus, including The Hurley Room in the Niswonger Commons and Rooms 213 and 202 in the Charles Oliver Gray North building. For specific location information, movie trailers and a complete list of films to be screened or for further information please visit the festival website at www.soapiff.com, or call Festival Director Amelia Fry at (423) 943-8295, or Festival Coordinator Bridget Chandley at (423) 361-3370.

The purpose of Southern Appalachian International Film Festival 2011:  Hidden in the Mountains is to publicly recognize, promote and preserve the work of independent filmmakers and encourage film production and film culture in Southern Appalachia.

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