Archive | March, 2012

Six school systems participate in Northeast Tennessee District National History Day at Tusculum

Posted on 30 March 2012 by eestes@tusculum.edu

More than 100 students from six school systems participated in the Northeast Tennessee District National History Day on March 20 at Tusculum College.

Students created exhibits, documentaries and websites, wrote papers and wrote and performed plays on a topic that related to this year’s theme, “Revolution, Reaction, Reform in History.” The top winners in each category advance to the state competition on April 21 in Nashville.

Schools participating included Chuckey-Doak High School, Chuckey-Doak Middle School, McDonald Elementary School, Mosheim Middle School and South Greene High School from the Greene County School System; Cosby High School from the Cocke County School System; Greeneville Middle School from the Greeneville School System; Happy Valley Middle School from the Carter County School System; John Sevier Middle School from the Kingsport School System, and Sullivan Central High School from the Sullivan County School System. A home schooled student also participated.

This is the first year for a district National History Day event in Northeast Tennessee. Previously, students from this area participated in the East Tennessee District competition in Knoxville.

District National History Day in Northeast Tennessee was funded by the Andrew Johnson Heritage Association with support from the Niswonger Foundation. Nikki Niswonger, representing the foundation and association, presented the awards. Additional support was provided by Tusculum College as the event’s host.

Sponsors and donors for the event included the Center for Appalachian Studies and Services at East Tennessee State University, Plus Mark – American Greetings, McDonald’s, Pal’s, Taco Bell and Zaxby’s.

Darlene McCleish, National History Day resource coordinator for the Northeast Tennessee district, worked in the schools to help students and teachers as the projects were prepared throughout the school year. Helping coordinate the event and providing guidance to the judges and volunteers was George Collins of the Andrew Johnson Heritage Association.

Overall medal winners in the junior division, grades 6-8, and in the senior division, grades 9-12, advance to the state competition.

Junior Division

Junior division individual winners included:

  • Dustin Ottinger, a sixth grader at Greeneville Middle School, who won first place in the documentaries division with his work about Franklin D. Roosevelt;
  • In the exhibit category, Vanessa Dykes, an eighth grader from Happy Valley Middle School, won first place in the individual exhibit category with her project; “Footprints of an American Soldier;” Colby McKeehan, also an eighth grader from Happy Valley, won second place with his exhibit, “The Cuban Missile Crisis,” and Hayley Willett, a seventh grader from Mosheim Middle School, won third place with her display about John Brown’s revolt.
  • Ryne Tipton, an eighth grader from John Sevier Middle School, won first place in the papers division with his work, “Elihu Embree: Abolition in East Tennessee.”

Junior division group winners included:

  • In the documentaries category, Ashley Babb, Jamie Lee Clark and Kalee Johnson, eighth graders from Happy Valley Middle, won first place with their work about the reaction to the assassination of Abraham Lincoln; Ali Shepherd and Addie Leonard, seventh graders from Greeneville Middle, placed second with their documentary about Oak Ridge and the making of the atomic bomb; Madison Wilder and Tiffany Walker, sixth graders from Chuckey-Doak, placed third with their project about Rosa Parks.
  • In the exhibits category, Christian Durocher and Joseph Byrum, eighth graders from Happy Valley, won first place with their display about Chernobyl; Karli Ailshie and Violet Boss, eighth graders from Greeneville Middle, won second place with their display, “The Association that Revolutionized Medicine Forever,” and Haven Humphreys, Syndney Humphreys and Drew Ripley, sixth graders from Chuckey-Doak, placed third with their project about the plague in the Middle Ages.
  • In the performance category, first place was won by Hana Auchterlonie, Brittany Everhart, Ashley Moore and Maddux Southerland, eighth graders from Mosheim Middle with their play, “The Fight for Equality;” second place was “Revolt of the Night Riders of Reelfoot Lake” by Luke Douthat, Whittney Heaton, Will Melton, Ashton Pierce and Allen Tolliver, eighth graders from McDonald Elementary, and third place was “Reaction to Propaganda During the Holocaust” by Sarah Beets, Joey Chandler, Alicia Dyer and Racheal Kirk, also eighth graders from McDonald.
  • In the websites category, first place went to Courtney Babb, Sadie Buchanan and Mallory Hall, sixth graders from Happy Valley, with their project about reaction and reform from the sinking of the R.M.S. Titanic.

Senior Division

Senior division individual winners included:

  • Courtney Smith, a ninth grader from South Greene, who won first place in the exhibit category with her project about the Pottertown Bridge Burners, with second place going to Jacob Maine, a ninth grader from Sullivan Central, with his project about England’s Civil War;
  • Jacob Taylor, a homeschooled tenth grader, won first place in the papers category with his paper about the Overmountain Men.
  • Wesley Harris, a student at South Greene, won first place in the websites category with his project about Jim Crow laws.

In the group category for documentaries, first place was won by Sierra Holder, Cody Morgan and Ashley Ruess, eleventh graders from South Greene, with their project about integration of public schools; Jonathan Burchell, William Etter, Hunter Henry, Tyler Showman and Patrick Vance, tenth graders also from South Greene, won second with their documentary about Julius Caesar, and Caley Williamson and Lindsey Williamson, students at Cosby High School, won third place with their project, “Revolution Over the Mountain.”

Awards were also presented in relation to research and topics. These awards include cash prizes provided by the award sponsors. Jacob Taylor received the “Best Use of Primary Resources” award sponsored by Lois Smith of Century 21 Legacy. “Best Entry related to African-American or Native American History” was presented to Sierra Holder, Cody Morgan and Ashley Reuss. This award was also sponsored by Smith.

Hana Auchterlonie, Brittany Everhart, Ashley Moore and Maddux Southerland received the awards for “Best Entry Related to Women’s History” and “Best Bibliography.”  The women’s history award was sponsored by the Andrew Johnson Heritage Association from gifts given in honor of the late Lillian Taylor, a former president of the organization. The bibliography award was sponsored by Mapes Piano String Company.

Luke Douthat, Whittney Heaton, Will Melton, Ashton Pierce and Allen Tolliver received the award for “Best Entry Related to Tennessee History.” This award was sponsored by Copies Unlimited.

Grade level awards were also presented.

The sixth grade awards included: documentaries-individual, Dustin Ottinger from Greeneville Middle (GMS), first place, and J.T. Pierce from Chuckey-Doak Middle (CDMS), second; documentaries-group: Madison Wilder and Tiffany Walker from GMS, first; Elijah Deyton and Matthew Fisher from GMS, second, and Nathanel Moon and Jacob Willett from CDMS, third; exhibits-individual, first place, Taylor Craft from CDMS; exhibits-groups, Darli Alshie and Violet Boss, GMS, first place; Haven Humphreys, Syndney Humphreys, Drew Ripley, CDMS, second; and Courtney Jessie, Kaitlyn Robinette and Abbee Swatzell from Mosheim, third, and papers, Allison Chudina from GMS, first place; James Duer from GMS, second, and Nathaniel Ashley from GMS, third.

The seventh grade winners included: documentaries-individuals, Ezra Skwarka from Mosheim, first place; Sam McNeese from GMS, second; documentaries-groups, Addie Leonard and Ali Shepherd from GMS, first place; Drew Daugherty, Dawson Martin and Brandon Waddell from GMS, second place, and Savannah Hawkins and Sarah Troy from GMS, third; exhibits-individuals, Hayley Willett from Mosheim, first, and papers, Riley Alexander from GMS, first place.

Eighth grader winners included: documentaries-group, Sahley Babb, Jamie Lee Clark and Kaylee Johnson from Happy Valley, first place, and Courtney Adams, Samantha Mungwira and Kenzie Richardson from Happy Valley, second; exhibits-individual, Vanessa Dykes from Happy Valley, first; Colby McKeehan from Happy Valley, second, and Jessica Rosenbalm from McDonald, third; exhibits-groups, Joseph Byrum and Christian Durocher from Happy Valley, first; Morgan Hudson and Signe Mikkelson of John Sevier Middle, second, and Dylan Kirk and Spencer Lawson from McDonald, third; performances, Hana Auchterlonie, Brittany Everhart, Ashley Moore and Maddux Southerland from Mosheim, first place; Luke Douthat, Whittney Heaton, Will Melton, Ashton Pierce and Allen Tolliver from McDonald, second place, and Sarah Beets, Joey Chandler, Alicia Dyer and Racheal Kirk from McDonald, third, and papers, Ryne Tipton from John Sevier, first place, and Jade Stout from Happy Valley, second.

Ninth grade winners included Jacob Maine from Sullivan Central, first place in individual exhibits, and Luke Martin and Zach Wise from Sullivan Central, second place in group exhibits.

Tenth grade winners included first place in documentaries, Jonathan Burchnell, William Etter, Henry Hunter, Tyler Showman and Patrick Vance from South Greene, and first place in papers, Jacob Taylor, a home-schooled student.

Eleventh grade winners included: group documentaries, Sierra Holder, Cody Morgan and Ashley Reuss from South Greene, first place, and Caley Williamson and Lindsey Williams from Cosby, second place; individual exhibits, Courtney Smith from South Greene, first place, and group exhibits, Lillie Blazer and Zullybeth Mazares from Chuckey-Doak, second place and Brittany Acree, Jasmine Ricks and Tiffany Smeler from Cosby, third place.

Judges for the competition included educators and those involved in heritage organizations and agencies. The judges included Dr. George Blanks, president of the Greene County Heritage Trust; Debra Jo Boles, K-8 instructional supervisor for Greene County Schools; Amy Collins, director of the Archives of Appalachia in the Center for Appalachian Studies and Services at ETSU; Judy Collins, a retired elementary school teacher; Joyce Doughty, president of the Andrew Johnson Heritage Association; Marilyn duBrisk, artist-in-residence and director of Tusculum College Arts Outreach; Dr. Paul Fox, interim director of the School of Education at Tusculum; Carolyn Gregg, retired elementary school teacher and professor of education at Tusculum; Barbara Holt, costume director of Tusculum Arts Outreach; Angelelia Johnson, technology specialist at Chuckey Elementary School; Yhona Jones, K-8 instructional supervisor for the Greene County Schools; Ruth Kross, adjunct professor of history at Tusculum; Kathryn Mitchell, education park ranger at the Andrew Johnson National Historic Site; Garry Renfro, graphic arts and pre-press specialist at American Greetings; Randy Sanders, managing editor of Now and Then, the magazine of ETSU’s Center for Appalachian Studies and Services; Amy Saxonmeyer, artist and musician; Dr. Don Sexton,  professor emeritus-history at Tusculum, and Chris Small from the Lincoln Project.

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World-renown balladeer Shelia Adams to perform with Judy Rhodes April 20 at Tusculum College, to lead workshop April 21

Posted on 30 March 2012 by eestes@tusculum.edu

Internationally known balladeer and storyteller Shelia Kay Adams and accomplished local musician Judy Rhodes will perform Friday, April 20, at Tusculum College.

The duo will bring one of the pillars of Appalachian music to the stage – ballads that have been used to tell stories and impart emotions in a distinctive sound born of the mountains. The performance will begin at 7 p.m. in the Pioneer Perk in the Niswonger Commons. Tickets are $10 and seats are limited for the performance, which is part of the Old Oak Festival.

On Saturday, Adams and Rhodes will be conducting a ballad singing and performance coaching workshop at the Doak House Museum on campus. The workshop will be from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Adams, an internationally known storyteller and balladeer from Madison County, N.C., will provide instruction in ballad singing for all ability levels. A self-styled keeper of the song traditions of the mountains, she performs English, Scottish and Irish ballads that have been handed down in her family for generations as well as other traditional stories.

A performer at major festivals, colleges and universities, Adams has also been featured in several documentary films and articles in printed publications and has lent her expertise to the production of the award-winning film, “Songcatcher.” She is an author and a talented musician on the five-string banjo.

Judy Rhodes will be assisting Adams in teaching the class. Rhodes is an accomplished musician and teacher, who is interested in discovering new ways to honor the traditional music of the region.

The fee for the class is $45, which includes materials and instruction. Workshop attendees can attend the Friday night performance for $5.

Following the workshop on Saturday, attendees can participate in an open mic time, beginning at 4 p.m., at the Pioneer Perk.

For more information, to reserve tickets for Friday’s performance or to make reservations for the workshop, please contact Leah Walker at 423-636-8554 or email lwalker@tusculum.edu.

The Doak House Museum and the President Andrew Johnson Museum and Library are operated by the Department of Museum Program and Studies of Tusculum College. In addition to the museums, the department is responsible for the College Archives and offers one of the few undergraduate Museum Studies degree programs in the country. The two museums are also part of the National Historic District on the Tusculum College campus. Follow the museums on Facebook and Twitter to learn the latest news and upcoming events or visit its Web site at www.tusculum.edu/museums to learn more about the variety of programs offered at the museums.

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New Jersey alumni events scheduled

New Jersey alumni events scheduled

Posted on 30 March 2012 by eestes@tusculum.edu

Alumni, parents and friends of Tusculum College are cordially invited to attend two alumni events scheduled for April in Glen Rock and Cherry Hill, New Jersey.

The Glen Rock event will be 5:30 to 7 p.m. Monday, April 23, at the Glen Rock Inn at 222 Rock Road, Glen Rock, NJ 07542.

Following on Tuesday, April 24, will be the Cherry Hill event at Caffe Aldo Lamberti. The restaurant is at 2011 Route 70 West, Cherry Hill, NJ 08002. To locate the restaurant using a GPS, please use 2011 Marlton Pike West as the address.

Learn the latest about the College from Heather Patchett, vice president of institutional advancement, and catch up with friends.

The first round of appetizers will be provided at each event and a cash bar will be available.

Please RSVP for either event by Wednesday, April 18,l by calling 1-800-729-0256 ext. 5303 or emailing alumni@tusculum.edu You may also register online below.

 

Your Name
Class Year
Spouse/Guest Name
Class Year
Address
City
State
Zip Code:
Telephone:
Email
Number of Persons Attending
Which event will you attend?
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Festival schedule continuing to take shape

Festival schedule continuing to take shape

Posted on 30 March 2012 by eestes@tusculum.edu

The Old Oak Festival is returning to the Tusculum College campus April 19-22, and will include artists from a variety of genres, as well as live music ranging from blues to blue grass.

 

The arts and music festival will span four days and will feature something for everyone, including music, art, theater and poetry, as well as gallery and museum exhibits on the campus of Tusculum College.

 

“We have had a tremendous response from the community regarding the revival of the Old Oak Festival on the Tusculum campus,” said Susan Vance, associate vice president for Institutional Advancement at Tusculum and coordinator of the event committee.

 

“We are expecting a wide variety of artists, including painters, craftsmen and sculptors, whose work will be available for purchase. Arts will include pottery, woodcrafts and folk art,” said Vance. In addition, on stage, the festival will present the sounds of the region, with a wide variety of music from bluegrass to jazz to local vocalists and musicians.

 

The festival runs from Thursday, April 19 through Sunday, April 22. Activities will be going on all four days; however, vendors, artisans and musicians will be performing and have their wares available for sale Friday and Saturday. For complete schedule of events please visit the website at www.oldoakfestival.org.

 

Artisans whose work will be on display during the festival include Collins Lane Art which specializes in wheel-thrown pottery for use in baking and serving, as well as glass assemblies such as the tree of life and abstract places using silver, bronze and copper wire enhancements.

 

The Evergreen Woodcarvers will demonstrate the art of woodcarving and provide lessons for those who wish to learn the skill.

 

Art vendors vary from images painted on feathers by Buckthorn Artistic Originals to Nick Hankins mixed media paintings, which include oil, watercolor and acrylic.

 

Other vendors are Tusculum College art students; Richard and Freda Donoho, artists in glass; Jimmy and Judy Rader, artists in wood; Joan Beaver, pencil and oil prints; Broyles Oak Rockers; Ben Clark’s ink prints; Josh Swatzell, photography; Crafty Lady, crochet rugs; Betty Goudy, oil paintings and bird houses; W.T. Hines, cooper (metal arts); Light Images, photography; Channa Payne, jewelry; Walnut Ridge Llamas, spinning and weaving; Rew Art, acrylic painting, and Mike Willis, wood items.

 

Music held at the Old Oak festival will feature acoustic rock, blues, blue grass, electric rock, R&B and gospel. Musicians participating in the festival include the Tusculum College Jazz band under the direction of David A. Price, Stephen Winslow, Michael Cable and his Hot Mountain Caravan, Zack Wampler, Wayne and Jean Bean, Lonesome Pine, Shiloh Rd, Mike Joy, The Kevin Wilder Group, The Scat Kats, Mud Bugs, Jamie D and the B Movie Blues, Sandy Ray and the Cold Shoulders, The Madisons, Boot Leg Turn and The Foundation.

 

There will be three performances during the festival of “The Diary of Anne Frank,” presented by Theatre-at-Tusculum. Show times are Friday and Saturday, April 20 and 21 at 7 p.m. and Sunday afternoon at 2 p.m. Tickets may be reserved in advance by calling 423-789-1620.

 

The play is based on the diary of Anne Frank, a young Jewish teen whose family is in hiding in German-occupied Holland. The diary covers a two-year span and is a both a coming-of-age story and a peek into the daily existence of a family in hiding during the Holocaust.

 

The college’s Allison Gallery at the Rankin House will be open throughout the weekend, featuring top student work in a “best of” show for student painting, sculpture and photography.

Food vendors will be on campus and will include the Pioneer Perk; John Price, hotdogs and Polish sausage; Ella Price, strawberry shortcake and hot fudge cake; Debbie Haney, gyros and phillly cheese steak sandwiches; Rural Resources, health food including veggie wraps; Karly’s Kettlecorn, and the Creamy Cup offering coffee and ice cream.

 

The festival is being coordinated by a committee of college and community representatives who are working to bring the historical event back as a major arts and music event in the East Tennessee region.

 

On Thursday, April 19, a launch party will be held for the “Tusculum Review,” the literary journal produced by faculty and students. The journal features works of top creative fiction, non-fiction, art and poetry from writers across the country. Special guest readers are essayist Katie Fallon and poet Gary McDowell. The event will begin at 7 p.m. in the Shulman Atrium.

Both the President Andrew Johnson Museum and Library and the Doak House Museum will be open to visitors during the festival and will have special activities planned for adults and children.

A special Civil War exhibit, “Scholars then Soldiers” will be featured during the weekend of the Old Oak Festival at the President Andrew Johnson Museum and Library. Exhibit hours are Thursday and Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

The festival will also feature children’s activities and storytelling performances, as well as a chapel service on Sunday morning at the Garland Library.

 

There is no fee to attend the festival. Art vendor hours will be Friday from noon until 5 p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. For more information, contact Vance at 423-636-7303.

Parking will be available off Shiloh Road and across the Erwin Highway. No alcohol will be sold or permitted on campus.

 

No pets allowed on campus during the festival, however, service animals are welcome.

To learn more about the festival, please visit the Old Oak Festival website.

 

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Students present papers at undergraduate research conference

Students present papers at undergraduate research conference

Posted on 29 March 2012 by eestes@tusculum.edu

Tusculum College students Isiah Lyman, Billie McKenzie and Ryan Barker, from left, presented papers at the 2012 Blue Ridge Undergraduate Conference.

A number of Tusculum College students presented research papers and participated as part of a panelat the 2012 Blue Ridge Undergraduate Conference on March 30.

Ryan Barker, Isiah Lyman and Billi McKenzie presented for the Departments of History and Museum Studies at the conference, which will be held at Maryville College. A number of English students participated in a panel and presented papers. A psychology student, Jenny Grant, a senior from Franklin, Tenn., also presented a paper.

Barker, a sophomore majoring in history and English with a creative writing concentration, will be presenting his paper, “In Reverence of the Anti-.”  Barker, who is from Laurens, S.C., explores the characteristics of an antihero, its appearance in literature and historical figures who can be defined as antiheroes.

Lyman, history and political science major from Boiling Springs, S.C., will present a paper about the influence of Aristotle’s ideas on America’s founding fathers. In his paper, Lyman discusses the ideas from Aristotle’s “Politics” that can be found in the American form of government. Lyman is a junior.

McKenzie, a history and museum studies major from Allegan, Mich., will present a paper about the progressive reform movement and its effect on prostitution. In her paper, McKenzie, a freshmen, looks specifically at the Everleigh Club, a brothel in Chicago that was operated with specific standards for its employees, and how the Progressive Movement, by pushing to have red-light districts closed, may have encouraged more dangerous forms of prostitution.

The Blue Ridge Undergraduate Research Conference is designed to encourage undergraduates in colleges in the Appalachian region to conduct research projects by providing a high-quality, low pressure forum for presentations. More than 80 undergraduate students from eight colleges in East Tennessee and Kentucky attended last year’s conference.

 

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Displays by seniors to be featured at the Allison Art Gallery

Displays by seniors to be featured at the Allison Art Gallery

Posted on 29 March 2012 by eestes@tusculum.edu

Works by Tusculum College art and design students will be on display at the Allison Gallery on campus through the first week of May.

The Allison Gallery is located in the Rankin House, which is to the rear of the parking area beside Three Blind Mice on Erwin Highway. Regular hours for the gallery are noon to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Danielle Armstrong’s senior exhibition, “Interwoven,” was  on display March 26-31 with  a reception Tuesday, March 27.

Armstrong, who is from Blountville, is a double major in English with a concentration in creative writing and Art and Design with a concentration in studio art. “Interwoven” is inspired by Armstrong’s literary works as well as the work of her favorite authors. She has also bridged the gap between writer and illustrator with several books she has designed and constructed. “The Appalachian region has been a huge influence on the work that I do and the way I view the world,” said Armstrong. She says that the staircases found in her works come from the staircases in McCormick Hall, Welty-Craig residence hall, and Annie Hogan Byrd on campus.

After graduation, Armstrong plans to pursue a master of fine arts in creative writing. She has already received graduate school acceptance from the University of Central Florida, the University of Tennessee, and Mills College in San Francisco. She is the winner of this year’s Curtis and Billie Owens Literary Prize in the nonfiction category.

Artwork by senior Danielle Armstrong, above, was the first of the senior art exhibits to be displayed.

“Back Down South,” an exhibit of the photography and design work by Nathan Carver, was on display from April 2-6. A reception for Carver was held on Monday, April 2.

Carver, a graphic design major from Clarksville, has had his photography and design work featured in promotional materials for the Office of Admissions. He has been a fixture on the sidelines at many athletic events, taking action photos for the Department of Athletics. His design skill can be seen in team posters he has created. Last year, Carver received a silver Knoxville ADDY Award, one of the most prestigious awards in advertising and design, for his design of a poster for Stay True Tattoo Company in Johnson City.

He was also honored at Llast month’s American Advertising Federation of Knoxville ADDY® Awards for his publication works in the Pioneer Athletic Department. He received two Gold Student ADDY® Awards for his 2011 Football Poster and the 2011-2012 Women’s Basketball Media Guide Cover. He also received five Silver Student ADDY® Awards for the 2011 Baseball Media Guide Cover, 2011 Football Media Guide Cover, 2011-2012 Women’s Basketball Poster, and the 2011-2012 Men’s Basketball Media Guide Cover & Poster. Carver captured a Student Gold ADDY® Award for his photographic talents as well.

 

The second senior art exhibit will be work by award-winning photographer and graphic designer Nathan Carver.

Kristen Keefer will be displaying her work from April 9-13. A reception for Keefer, a graphic design major from Hague, N.Y.,  was on Monday, April 9. Keefer’s work can be seen on campus and other places that the upcoming Old Oak Festival is being promoted. Keefer recreated the festival’s original logo, which is now featured on posters and other promotional items related to the event.

For the Old Oak Festival, a juried student art show, featuring the best of student work, will be on display in the gallery from April 16-20. A reception for the featured artists will be held from 4-6 p.m. on Thursday, April 19. An auction of student art will take place at 4 p.m. on Saturday, April 21.

Work by Ashley Marinelli will be on exhibit from April 23-27. Marinelli is a graphic design major from Lexington, S.C. A reception for Marinelli will be held, but a date has not been set.

Jennifer Lawson’s art will be on display from April 30 through May 4. Lawson is a graphic design major from Knoxville, Tenn. The date of a reception for Lawson has not yet been set.

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Artisans, musicians announced for Old Oak Festival, April 19-22

Posted on 29 March 2012 by srichey@tusculum.edu

The Old Oak Festival is returning to the Tusculum College campus April 19-22, and will include artists from a variety of genres, as well as live music ranging from blues to blue grass.

The arts and music festival will span four days and will feature something for everyone, including music, art, theater and poetry, as well as gallery and museum exhibits on the campus of Tusculum College.

“We have had a tremendous response from the community regarding the revival of the Old Oak Festival on the Tusculum campus,” said Susan Vance, associate vice president for Institutional Advancement at Tusculum and coordinator of the event committee.

“We are expecting a wide variety of artists, including painters, craftsmen and sculptors, whose work will be available for purchase. Arts will include pottery, woodcrafts and folk art,” said Vance. In addition, on stage, the festival will present the sounds of the region, with a wide variety of music from bluegrass to jazz to local vocalists and musicians.

The festival runs from Thursday, April 19 through Sunday, April 22. Activities will be going on all four days; however, vendors, artisans and musicians will be performing and have their wares available for sale Friday and Saturday. For complete schedule of events please visit the website at www.oldoakfestival.org.

Artisans whose work will be on display during the festival include Collins Lane Art which specializes in wheel-thrown pottery for use in baking and serving, as well as glass assemblies such as the tree of life and abstract places using silver, bronze and copper wire enhancements.

The Evergreen Woodcarvers will demonstrate the art of woodcarving and provide lessons for those who wish to learn the skill.

Art vendors vary from images painted on feathers by Buckthorn Artistic Originals to Nick Hankins mixed media paintings, which include oil, watercolor and acrylic.

Other vendors are Tusculum College art students; Richard and Freda Donoho, artists in glass; Jimmy and Judy Rader, artists in wood; Joan Beaver, pencil and oil prints; Broyles Oak Rockers; Ben Clark’s ink prints; Josh Swatzell, photography; Crafty Lady, crochet rugs; Betty Goudy, oil paintings and bird houses; W.T. Hines, cooper (metal arts); Light Images, photography; Channa Payne, jewelry; Walnut Ridge Llamas, spinning and weaving; Rew Art, acrylic painting, and Mike Willis, wood items.

Music held at the Old Oak festival will feature acoustic rock, blues, blue grass, electric rock, R&B and gospel. Musicians participating in the festival include the Tusculum College Jazz band under the direction of David A. Price, Stephen Winslow, Michael Cable and his Hot Mountain Caravan, Zack Wampler, Wayne and Jean Bean, Lonesome Pine, Shiloh Rd, Mike Joy, The Kevin Wilder Group, The Scat Kats, Mud Bugs, Jamie D and the B Movie Blues, Sandy Ray and the Cold Shoulders, The Madisons, Boot Leg Turn and The Foundation.

There will be three performances during the festival of “The Diary of Anne Frank,” presented by Theatre-at-Tusculum. Show times are Friday and Saturday, April 20 and 21 at 7 p.m. and Sunday afternoon at 2 p.m. Tickets may be reserved in advance by calling 423-789-1620.

The play is based on the diary of Anne Frank, a young Jewish teen whose family is in hiding in German-occupied Holland. The diary covers a two-year span and is a both a coming-of-age story and a peek into the daily existence of a family in hiding during the Holocaust.

The college’s Allison Gallery at the Rankin House will be open throughout the weekend, featuring top student work in a “best of” show for student painting, sculpture and photography.

Food vendors will be on campus and will include the Pioneer Perk; John Price, hotdogs and Polish sausage; Ella Price, strawberry shortcake and hot fudge cake; Debbie Haney, gyros and phillly cheese steak sandwiches; Rural Resources, health food including veggie wraps; Karly’s Kettlecorn, and the Creamy Cup offering coffee and ice cream.

The festival is being coordinated by a committee of college and community representatives who are working to bring the historical event back as a major arts and music event in the East Tennessee region.

On Thursday, April 19, a launch party will be held for the “Tusculum Review,” the literary journal produced by faculty and students. The journal features works of top creative fiction, non-fiction, art and poetry from writers across the country. Special guest readers are essayist Katie Fallon and poet Gary McDowell. The event will begin at 7 p.m. in the Shulman Atrium.

Both the President Andrew Johnson Museum and Library and the Doak House Museum will be open to visitors during the festival and will have special activities planned for adults and children.

A special Civil War exhibit, “Scholars then Soldiers” will be featured during the weekend of the Old Oak Festival at the President Andrew Johnson Museum and Library. Exhibit hours are Thursday and Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

The festival will also feature children’s activities and storytelling performances, as well as a chapel service on Sunday morning at the Garland Library.

There is no fee to attend the festival. Art vendor hours will be Friday from noon until 5 p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. For more information, contact Vance at 423-636-7303.

Parking will be available off Shiloh Road and across the Erwin Highway. No alcohol will be sold or permitted on campus.

No pets allowed on campus during the festival, however, service animals are welcome.

 

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Tusculum College named to Presidential Honor Roll for Community Service for sixth time

Posted on 29 March 2012 by srichey@tusculum.edu

Tusculum College has been honored by the Corporation for National and Community Service and the U.S. Department of Education with a place on the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll with Distinction for the sixth year in a row. The designation recognizes colleges and universities for exemplary service efforts and service to America’s communities.

Tusculum College was selected for the Honor Roll with Distinction for its work in education, hunger, homelessness, environmental stewardship, economic empowerment and youth development in the East Tennessee region. Students have worked with Rural Resources, Greeneville-Greene County Community Ministries and Food Bank, Greene County Habitat for Humanity, Critter Works, Mustang Alley Horse Rescue, Inc., the Greeneville and Greene County school systems, the Boys and Girls Club, the Mission Soup Kitchen at Tabernacle Presbyterian Church and many other groups.

“Tusculum College is proud to have been recognized for the efforts that our staff, faculty and students put into the Civic Arts and community service projects,” said Tusculum College President Nancy B. Moody.

She added that service projects and service learning experiences are part of the core of Tusculum College’s mission that includes the Civic Arts and service to others as part of its overall mission.

Launched in 2006, the Community Service Honor Roll is the highest federal recognition a school can achieve for its commitment to service-learning and civic engagement. Honorees for the award were chosen based on a series of selection factors including scope and innovation of service projects, percentage of student participation in service activities, incentives for service and the extent to which the school offers academic service-learning courses.

In addition, numerous projects have been completed by staff, faculty and other volunteer groups associated with Tusculum College.

The Honor Roll is a program of the Corporation for National and Community Service, in collaboration with the Department of Education, the Department of Housing and Urban Development and the President’s Council on Service and Civic Participation. The President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll is presented during the annual conference of the American Council on Education.

“Through service, these institutions are creating the next generation of leaders by challenging students to tackle tough issues and create positive impacts in the community,” said Robert Velasco, acting chief executive officer of the Corporation for National and Community Service.

“We applaud the Honor Roll schools, their faculty and students for their commitment to make service a priority in and out of the classroom. Together, service and learning increase civic engagement while fostering social innovation among students, empowering them to solve challenges within their communities.”

For more information, go to www.nationalservice.gov/.

 

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Three students recognized for literary works

Three students recognized for literary works

Posted on 26 March 2012 by eestes@tusculum.edu

Winners of the 2012 Curtis and Billie Owens Literary Awards included Justin Reed, left, and Danielle Armstrong, right. Author Erin Tocknell, center, made the announcement of the winners of the annual literary competition for Tusculum College students during a reading of her work on Thursday.

Tusculum College students Justin Reed, Danielle Armstrong and Andrew Baker are the winners of the 2012 Curtis and Billie Owens Literary Awards, annually presented to recognize the literary achievements of the college’s creative writing students.

Reed was the award recipient in two categories. His poems, “The Catacomb Kids” and “/’win tƏr/Poem,” earned him the award for the poetry category, and his script, “Act One of the Devil’s Pander” was named the scriptwriting winner. The senior creative writing major from Florence, S.C., also recently had his work recognized at the 52nd annual Lex Allen Literary Festival at Hollins University. One of Reed’s poems, “Everyone Down Here is Pretty,” was selected as runner up in the poetry division of this national event.

Danielle Armstrong was selected the award recipient in the non-fiction category with her essay, “On Rejection.” This is the second time that Armstrong has received an Owens Literary Award. She also won the non-fiction category in 2010. Armstrong is a senior from Blountville, Tenn., majoring in creative writing

Andrew Baker received an “honorable mention” in the non-fiction category for his work “Running Toward White Castle.” Baker is a junior from Athens, Tenn., majoring in creative writing.

The literary award was named for Curtis Owens, a 1928 graduate of Tusculum College who went on to a teaching career at what is now Pace University in New York.  He and his wife established the Owens Award at his alma mater to encourage and reward excellence in writing among Tusculum students.

The announcement of the winners was made during a reading Thursday evening by award-winning author Erin Tocknell, who served as the judge for the final round of competition. The reading was part of the annual Humanities Series, sponsored by the Tusculum College English Department.

Tocknell read the essay, “That’s What We’re Doing Here,” about her experiences as a small-town news reporter. The essay is included in her first book, “Confederate Streets,” which won the Benu Press Social Justice and Equity Award in Creative Non-Fiction. A teacher at the McCallie School in Chattanooga, she was the winner of the Association of Writers & Writing Programs Intro Award in 2007 and has been published in “Tampa Review,” “The Southern Review,” “Ancient Paths” and “Oakland Review.”

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Lex Allen student group shot

Tusculum English majors attend literary festival

Posted on 22 March 2012 by srichey@tusculum.edu

On Saturday, March 10, seven Tusculum College English creative writing majors attended Hollins University’s 52nd Annual Lex Allen Literary Festival in Roanoke, Va. with Heather Patterson, associate professor of English.

Attending students include Danielle Armstrong, a senior from Blountville; Joseph Borden, a sophomore from Lyles; Kenneth Wayne Hill, a senior from White Pine; Noelle Rankin, a junior from Hixson; Justin Reed, a senior from Florence, S.C.; Ben Sneyd a senior from Greeneville and formerly of Erwin, and Abigail Wolfenbarger, a senior from New Market.

The festival included readings by double National Education Association Fellowship recipient David Huddle, Prairie Schooner Book Prize winner and fiction writer Katherine Vaz and Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Natasha Trethewey.

Students were invited to submit creative works for the festival’s contests in poetry and fiction. Students Armstrong and Reed were selected as two of seventeen finalists in the poetry category. Their work was read and discussed in a poetry panel comprised of Huddle; Tretheway; poet, novelist, essayist and translator Jeanne Larsen, and poet Thorpe Moeckel.

Reed’s poem, “Everyone Down Here is Pretty” was selected as runner-up winner of the poetry prize. The overall winner was a student from Hollins.

In acknowledgement of the quality of Reed’s poem, Trethewey signed a copy of her Pulitzer Prize-winning book, “Native Guard,” one of Reed’s prizes for second place with, “To Justin, in admiration of your poem.”

Reed said, “I had kind of approached this experience with a pack mind. I wanted Tusculum to walk away with something. We did. It feels good to flaunt our family, and I’m glad I helped.”

“These writers served as exceptional representatives of Tusculum College,” said Patterson. I was approached several times by members of Hollins faculty, and they complimented our students on their writing and their dedication to publishing. Lisa Radcliff, (Hollins University English Department programs assistant) was impressed with their questions, their work and their overall presence at the festival—as this is the first time Tusculum has attended—and poet Jeanne Larsen commented to me that she remembered the name ‘Tusculum’ because of the ‘fine journal you all put out there.’”

Of his time at the festival, Sneyd said, “It was a blast. Getting to listen to writers like Natasha Trethewey isn’t something undergraduate students get to do every day. Also, the opportunities to meet people and network have been endless for us on these trips, and I look forward to attending the festival again in the future.”

 

Patterson added, “We should be proud of our writing students’ achievements. The contest pool was rather large.”

Tusculum students competed against 204 entrants in poetry from colleges and universities including Harvard University, Susquehanna University, Penn State-Erie, the University of South Florida, Sweet Briar College, Middlebury College, Guilford College, James Madison University, Washington and Lee University, Emerson College, Case Western Reserve University, Salem College, Western Kentucky University, the University of North Carolina-Asheville, Hiram College, Virginia Western Community College, Hollins University and the University of Alabama.

Students attending the Literary Festival included (back row) Justin Reed, Ben Sneyd and Kenny Hill. Front row, Noelle Rankin, Joe Borden, Abby Wolfenbarger and Danielle Armstrong

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civilwarexhibit_reception

‘Scholars then Soldiers’ Civil War Exhibit now open at President Andrew Johnson Museum and Library

Posted on 20 March 2012 by eestes@tusculum.edu

The new “Scholars then Soldiers: Tusculum College and the American Civil War” exhibit opened Saturday with a reception at the President Andrew Johnson Museum and Library on the Tusculum College campus. The student-created exhibit features information about the 19 alumni who fought during the war and the effect that the Civil War had on Tusculum College, including the merger with Greeneville College that had most of its assets destroyed due to the conflicts. The exhibit will be on display through the remainder of the Civil War Sesquicentennial in 2015. The museum, located in the “Old College” building on campus is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Monday-Friday. The museum will also be open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, April 21, as part of the Old Oak Festival on campus that weekend.

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batikdesign

Batik workshop held at Doak House Museum

Posted on 20 March 2012 by eestes@tusculum.edu

Dr. Fran Church, at right, guides Dollie Boyd, director of the Museums of Tusculum College, in applying wax to a batik design. The Doak House Museum held a workshop Thursday, Friday and Saturday to teach participants about the art of batik, which involves creating designs on fabric using wax and dye. Participants also created their own dyes using materials such as walnuts, berries and other natural materials. Dr. Church, an art instructor with 40 years of experience, led the workshop, which is part of the Doak House Museum’s “Crafting Appalachia” series and was made possible in part by a grant from East Tennessee Foundation’s Arts Fund for East Tennessee.

Batik allows designs to be created on fabric using a wax and dying technique. This design is between the waxing step and the one in which the dye is applied to the cloth.

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