Archive | February, 2017

Tusculum President Dr. Nancy Moody announces retirement

Tusculum President Dr. Nancy Moody announces retirement

Posted on 28 February 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

Dr. Nancy B. Moody, the first female to serve as president of Tusculum College, will retire at the end of 2017.

Dr. Moody submitted her letter of intent to the Tusculum Board of Trustees during their February meeting. She will continue to serve until December 31. She has served as president of Tusculum College since 2009.

Dr. Kenneth A. Bowman, chair of the board and 1970 alumnus of the college, said that a presidential search committee is being formed and will be chaired by Dr. Greg Nelson, a Tusculum College trustee. The Board will also be interviewing search firms for possible use in the search for a new president.

In her letter, Dr. Moody stated, “I am honored to have had the opportunity to serve as the 27th president, and first female president, of this historic institution. In the last 7.5 years, the most memorable events for me have been the relationships that I have had the good fortune of developing with students, the Board of Trustees, alumni, members of the local community, faculty and staff, and particularly with donors, most notably Verna June Meen.

“Verna June came to love Tusculum and her interactions at events with members of the Board and others.  She expressed on more than one occasion, how proud she was to have provided support to Tusculum College for the Meen Center for Science and Math and for two endowments, one to fund scholarships and one to fund an endowed professorship in Chemistry.”

Dr. Bowman said, “It was eight years ago that Dr. Moody began the interview process for the presidency at Tusculum College.  During her tenure, she has led the college into a new era of growth and expansion, in terms of bricks and mortar, academic programs and fiscal responsibility.”

He added that one of the highlights of her term has been the construction of the Meen Center, the larger of the two academic building constructed in approximately 50 years on the Tusculum campus. The Thomas G. Garland Library renovation was the first in 2008. Dr. Moody shepherded the state-of-the-art 100,000-square foot Meen Center project every step of the way, from the initial approval to the funding and finally to overseeing the construction of this state-of-the-art facility which was occupied by students and faculty last month.

Dr. Nancy B. Moody

He added, since assuming the college presidency as the first female in Tusculum’s history to hold the position, Dr. Moody has faced several challenges.

“During her first full year at Tusculum College, we had a very successful review by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges. Since that time, we have added new academic programs including criminal justice, bachelor’s and master’s degrees in nursing, an MBA program, the first associate degree program with more academic programs slated to begin this fall including a bachelor’s degree in healthcare management, a bachelor’s degree in talent development and a Master of Accountancy degree, all of which have been or will be reviewed and approved by SACSCOC.  We have also added new athletic programs in men’s and women’s lacrosse, track and field and STUNT, which will begin this fall.”

He continued, “Dr. Moody has embraced the opportunity to encourage faculty, staff, students and volunteers to push Tusculum College forward through creative teaching and learning into the world of online programming for dual enrollment, distance education and fully online programs.”

She has secured a total of $49.8 million in Community Facilities direct loans from the U.S. Department of Agriculture for the construction of the new science and math facility, as well as for the construction of two new apartment-style residence halls. The lower 40-year, fixed-rate interest rates on these loans significantly lowered what the college pays in debt service, making the new construction and renovation possible while also improving the college’s overall finances.

Dr. Moody also led the efforts that secured a $3.875 million gift for the naming of the Meen Center and two $1.5 million endowments to support faculty and students. She has successfully sought new gifts, donors and partnership in order to ensure the success of the new and existing programs. Working with donors, foundations and government agencies, she has encouraged the investment of millions of dollars into Tusculum College’s growth.

Dr. Bowman added that during her tenure, cash increased from $1.3 million to $3.7 million, long-term investments increased from $12.5 million to $27.7 million, capital assets increased from $58.9 million to $71.8 million and the college’s endowment increased from $14 million to $18.6 million.

The college’s Board of Trustees recognized Dr. Moody’s contributions to Tusculum by presenting her with the inaugural Founder’s Award in February 2013. The Founders’ Award, named in memory of Rev. Samuel Doak, Rev. Samuel Witherspoon Doak and Rev. Hezekiah Balch, is presented by the Tusculum College Board of Trustees to recognize those who with integrity, tenacity, commitment, ingenuity and drive have moved Tusculum College forward in serving its students, its community and the world at large.

Among other significant accomplishments, Dr. Moody was instrumental in obtaining a $264,000 grant from the BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee Health Foundation for a simulation laboratory for use in the nursing and related programs by students and staff and area community partners. The simulation lab is used to produce highly-qualified BSN graduates skilled at clinical decision-making, who will provide safe, competent and improved health care for future generations of Tennesseans.

Partnerships with other institutions are at an all-time high. Tusculum College has arranged articulation and affiliation agreements with regional community colleges and professional schools to both increase enrollment in the bachelor’s degree programs and afford expedited graduate school opportunities for alumni of Tusculum College.

“She has engaged with alumni and friends of the College, encouraging their continued interest and support in the institution. She has reminded all of the Tusculum community what it means to be a Tusculum Pioneer,” said Dr. Bowman.

Prior to joining Tusculum College, Dr. Moody was president of Lincoln Memorial University for seven years.  Under her leadership, LMU’s enrollment increased by 90 percent.  The university also initiated the Lincoln Memorial University-DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine and expanded the Caylor School of Nursing to include a master of science in nursing degree program with family nurse practitioner and nurse anesthesia concentrations.  Other programs initiated under her leadership included a master’s degree program preparing physician’s assistants and a doctorate of education degree.

A registered nurse, Dr. Moody began her academic career as a nursing instructor for Lincoln Memorial University in 1974 and advanced to hold several academic leadership positions there – including dean of the School of Nursing and Allied Health.  associate professor and department chair in the College of Nursing at East Tennessee State University, as the executive director of the Tennessee Center for Nursing, as assistant professor of nursing in the College of Nursing at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

Prior to joining Tusculum College, Dr. Moody was president of Lincoln Memorial University for seven years.  Under her leadership, LMU’s enrollment increased by 90 percent.  The university also initiated the Lincoln Memorial University-DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine and expanded the Caylor School of Nursing to include a master of science in nursing degree program with family nurse practitioner and nurse anesthesia concentrations.  Other programs initiated under her leadership included a master’s degree program preparing physician’s assistants and a doctorate of education degree.

She is the newly-elected chair of the Board of Trustees of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges, and has served as chair of the NCAA DII South Atlantic Conference, and an advisory board member for the Northeast Tennessee College and Career Readiness Consortium funded through an Investing in Innovation (i3) grant funded by the U. S. Department of Education and awarded to the Niswonger Foundation.

Dr. Moody received her associate’s and bachelor’s degrees in nursing from Eastern Kentucky University and earned a master of science in nursing from the Texas Women’s University Institute of Health Sciences-Houston Center in 1978.  She also received a doctorate in nursing from the University of Alabama at Birmingham’s School of Nursing.

During her career, Dr. Moody has been recognized by all three of her alma maters, Eastern Kentucky University, Texas Woman’s University and the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing, where she received the Chancellor’s Alumni Excellence Award.

She is married to Tom Moody, a self-employed public accountant. She and Tom are proud parents of two adult children, daughter, Mykel, and son, Adam.

 

 

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Pioneer Fishing Club takes top spot in Southeastern tournament

Pioneer Fishing Club takes top spot in Southeastern tournament

Posted on 27 February 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

The Tusculum College Fishing Club took first place in this weekend’s YETI FLW College Fishing Southeastern Conference event at Lake Guntersville.

Tusculum took the top spot with a slim 3-ounce margin over runner-up, the University of Georgia and in the process topped the largest field ever assembled for a college bass fishing tournament at 248 teams.

According to tournament officials, the new participation record eclipses the previous mark of 214 teams set last season at the Bassmaster College Series Southern Regional at Lake Martin. The previous FLW record was set and later matched in 2016 at the FLW College Fishing Open on Kentucky Lake in April and the Southeastern Conference qualifier at Lake Chickamauga in September.

For its win at Guntersville, the Tusculum team of Nick Hatfield, a senior business administration major from Greeneville, and Cory Neece, a junior environmental science major from Bristol, earned a spot in the 2018 FLW College Fishing National Championship. The top 24 teams qualified for the championship from this event: the top 10 plus one additional team for every 10 teams over 100 that participated.

According to Neece, the keys to the team’s success were staying shallow around grass and accommodating for windy, post-frontal conditions.

“We found a lot of fish in practice, but the wind and the mud washed a lot of areas out because it was so bad out there today,” he says. “We had a couple of areas that were protected, and that’s where we caught our fish.”

He added. “You had to fish them real slow and had to pick the area apart to get them to bite, and really we were making multiple casts in the same spot. You know the fish are there. It’s just getting them to bite.”

As a result team being among the top 10 qualifiers in the tournament, the Fishing Club program received a donation of $2,000 from Fishing League Worldwide. The money will be put into the Tusculum Fishing Club program.

The Pioneer Fishing Club is sponsored by Dr. Jason Jones, assistant professor of physical education. Anyone interested in the club should email nickhatfield.nh@gmail.com.

 

Nick Hatfield and Corey Neece of Tusculum College

 

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Vicary visits campus after doctorate in pharmacology and toxicology

Vicary visits campus after doctorate in pharmacology and toxicology

Posted on 23 February 2017 by eestes@tusculum.edu

Glen Vicary ’10 recently graduated with his doctorate in pharmacology from the University of Louisville. Pictured with him is Dr. Jesse Roman, Glen’s mentor during his graduate studies.

Dr. Glenn Vicary ’10 was back on campus in late January to visit with President Nancy B. Moody, Golf Coach Bob Dibble and Dr. Debra McGinn.

 

Vicary was in town visiting former classmates after recently completing his Ph.D. in pharmacology and toxicology at the University of Louisville. Dr. Vicary also holds a master’s degree in pharmacology and toxicology from the University of Louisville. He graduated from Tusculum with a Bachelor of Arts in biology and chemistry with a business focus.

 

He is a pulmonary remodeling disease scientist, pharmacologist and consultant trained in clinical research. While at Tusculum he was also a member of the successful men’s golf team. Dr. Vicary has been published in numerous scientific journals, including “Annals of American Thoracic Society,” “Respiratory Research,” “Thoracic Cancer” and “American Journal of Medical Sciences.” He has also presented at several conferences including the American Thoracic Society and Research!Louisville.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

’80s

Sam (Marie) Trapp ’81 of Nashville, TN, is teaching at Trevecca University as an adjunct professor. She is also teaching a First Communion class of second graders on Sunday and RCIC (Rite of Christian Initiation for Children) of second to fifth graders on Thursday at St. Stephen Catholic Community in Mount Juliet. Sam is also serving as a one-on-one mathematics tutor in Mount Juliet and Nashville schools.

 

’90s

Rodney “Chip” Walker, Jr. ’94 has been named to new head football coach at Newnan (Ga.) High School. Walker’s coaching resume’ is loaded with success as he compiled a 127-20-1 record including three state titles at Sandy Creek High School.

 

’00s

Stephanie Ryan Sessum ’03 has been named CEO of MPD (Metropolitan Police Department) Community Credit Union in Nashville, TN. Sessum has worked for the MPD Community Credit Union for nine years.

 

Leslie England ’09 has been promoted to senior vice president of retail banking at TnBank. A 15-year banking industry veteran, Leslie most recently served as vice president of retail banking and has been instrumental in increasing retail deposits at the financial institution. She joined TnBank  in 2013.

 

’10s

Tammy Combs ’12 has been named the new branch manager at the TVA Credit Union in Morristown, TN.

 

 

 

Kayla Marie (Jaynes) Hale ’10 and Philip Eugene Jennings, Jr. were married January 9, 2017, in Greeneville, TN.

 

 

 

 

Lois A. Teague ’41 of Greeneville, TN, passed away February 10, 2017. Ms. Teague taught in the Greene County and Greeneville school systems and worked for the Department of the Navy in Washington, D.C. She retired from The Austin Company in Greeneville. Ms. Teague was a member of Asbury United Methodist Church, where she was a member of the Susanna Wesley Sunday school class and the Bobbie Pierce Study Group. Her survivors include brother and Tusculum alumnus Dr. Dale A Teague ’51.

 

William “Bill” H. Hurst ’65 of Blountville, TN, passed away February 13, 2017. After graduating from Tusculum, Mr. Hurst went to work for Inter-Mountain Telephone in Greeneville. He retired in 2004 from Embarq after 40 years of service in the telecommunications industry. One of his favorite activities each year was making Christmas gifts for all the employees of the phone company. He also looked forward to his monthly luncheon with his former employees, “The Faithful Few.” Mr. Hurst and his family had resided on Boone Lake since 1985, and he was known for his love for his neighbors and his willingness to help them if a need arose.  He was an avid woodworker.

 

Robert J. Berryhill ’70 of Mosheim, TN, passed away January 31, 2017. Mr. Berryhill was retired from BASF and C-E Minerals. He was a member of St. Paul Presbyterian Church. Mr. Berryhill was an avid antique collector and part-time operator of Bank & Ellison Antique. He was also a history buff, enjoyed reading history books, loved flowers and dogs and looked forward to trips to flea markets.

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Discussion continues about a new approach to the academic study of Jesus’ life during lecture series

Discussion continues about a new approach to the academic study of Jesus’ life during lecture series

Posted on 23 February 2017 by eestes@tusculum.edu

The discussion of a new approach to the academic study of the gospels continued during the third session of the Theologian-in-Residence lecture series at Tusculum College, which is being led by Dr. Travis Williams.

Exploration of a different approach to the academic study of the life of Jesus continued on Tuesday during the third session of the Theologian-in-Residence lecture series at Tusculum College.

The topic of this year’s series is “Jesus in Early Christian Memory: Remember, Reconstructing and Rehearsing the Past.” Dr. Travis Williams, associate professor of religion at Tusculum, is the featured speaker of the series, which is sponsored by the college with support from Ron Smith.

In the second session of the series, Dr. Williams had introduced an approach to the scholarly study of Jesus’ life that incorporates recent research on memory and a variety of academic disciplines. As a historian, he said, studying the Bible through the lens of such disciplines as sociology and literature is not an attempt to downplay the text, but rather an effort to ascribe value to the Scriptures.

“As a valuable book, we want to bring all the approaches we can to study it,” he said. “We want to bring these disciplines to bear on the text to better understand it because it is important.” Theologians can then take this academic research and determine what it means on a spiritual level, he added.

This approach using a variety of academic disciplines and memory research is in contrast to the approach that has been used by a majority of scholars in their study of the gospels, which has sought to discover the “historic Jesus” by trying to peel away layers of interpretation and tradition to find the factual Jesus.

Building on his previous presentation that noted recent research into the memory process, Dr. Williams explored other aspects of memory that have been the subject of recent academic study – the impact of social environment on memory and eyewitness testimony.

As recent research has found, when an individual remembers an experience or event, it is not the process of retrieving the memory as from a filing cabinet as was previously thought, he noted, but the brain reconstructs the memory from various areas of the brain and this reconstruction is distorted by nature as it is influenced by a person’s current circumstances

In addition to being influenced by the present, an individual’s memories are influenced by his or her social group and environment. The trailblazer in research into the social dimension of memory was French scholar Maurice Halbwachs, who theorized that people’s recollections of the past are based on social environment. These include a person’s current circumstances, group affiliations, cultural environment and prior traditions.

Dr. Williams also discussed eyewitness testimony and recent research that has found people’s recollections can be malleable, influenced by such things as an individual’s bias or the passage of time.

Most scholars do not believe that the gospels were written by eyewitnesses or those who may have heard stories first-hand from eyewitnesses. “Historians look at plausibility in history,” he said, “and most scholars agree that the gospel authors most likely were not eyewitnesses, but this does not mean that the gospels are not based on eyewitness testimony.”

Looking through the perspective of social memory can bring a better understanding of Jesus by looking at how the circumstances of the later Christians who preserved the Jesus tradition may have impacted which memories were preserved and how he was remembered, Dr. Williams continued.

Reconstruction of memories does have constraints, he said, as the present does have an influence by memory is rooted in the past.

While historians cannot recreate the past or test it like a scientist, they can look at the imprint of the past, what is plausible, as they study the gospels, he noted, adding that is why historians are cautious in saying what they think Jesus is like.

The first step in this process would be to look at the circumstances of those who were transmitting the memories, look at how the memory process itself could have affected the recollections and then study the social context of those individual and how that could affect their perception of what they saw.

For example, he said, the question of the literacy of Jesus is a topic of debate. While some have debated this on theological grounds, others have debated the answer looking at historic evidence.

In looking at the context of the time, recent research has found that literacy was rare in the Palestine region during the time of Jesus (around three percent of the population), he said, and early Christianity was criticized for its uneducated leaders.

The memory process allows both representations of Jesus as either literate or illiterate to occur, Dr. Williams continued.  “In both cases, we have to explain the evidence as best we can,” he said. “The memory approach is an attempt to value the gospels. Instead of treating the stories found in the gospels as reciprocal parts of the real Jesus, the memory approach says all text is valuable. It is grounded in explaining sources instead of choosing between them for authenticity. What did the historical Jesus have to do to get them to remember him this way?”

In the concluding session of the series on Tuesday, Feb. 28, Dr. Williams’ focus will be the transmission of oral tradition within early Christian communities with particular attention given to the malleability and persistence of the Jesus tradition as it passed between people. The lecture will begin at 10 a.m. in the Chalmers Conference Center in the Niswonger Commons on the Tusculum College campus. Reservations are requested. Please call 423-636-7304 to make a reservation or email eestes@tusculum.edu.

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BlackHistoryMonthlecture_tvslide

Black History Month speaker tackles politics

Posted on 22 February 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

Dr. Daryl Carter was the keynote speaker at Tusculum College in February as part of the college’s celebration of Black History Month.

Dr. Carter, associate professor of history at East Tennessee State University, o spoke to a gathering of teachers, students and staff members about the topic of African-Americans and Politics in the 21st century.

“A lot of things are changing. The economy is changing, the way we live, the way we work, the way we connect,” said Dr. Carter. “We forget we are all human beings, and become consumed with trivial, we want someone else to feel our pain.”
Some of the focus of Dr. Carter’s speech was about the subject of former President Barack Obama and newly-elected President Donald Trump. He provided his opinions of both sides of each candidate and explained the differences and similarities of the duo. Dr. Carter gave clear insight of the problems and issues Americans have been facing since the year 2004.

Dr. Carter’s made the point that he was there to educate and make his audience ask themselves tough questions. He wanted to cast a critical eye on our society as it is now and on the people who hold enormous power in the United States.

“It’s time we reconsider what it means to be American,” said Dr. Carter. “It starts at home; teaching what is a fact to our kids is important.”

 

 

By Haley Klages, senior journalism and professional writing major from Franklin

 

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Tusculum Band Program to present winter concert on Tuesday, Feb. 28

Tusculum Band Program to present winter concert on Tuesday, Feb. 28

Posted on 22 February 2017 by eestes@tusculum.edu

Sacred music, hymns and gospel will be featured genres during the Tusculum College Band’s winter concert on Tuesday, Feb. 28.

The concert will begin at 7 p.m. in the auditorium of the Annie Hogan Byrd Fine Arts Building. The local community is invited to the performance, which will feature the Concert Band, Jazz Band and Handbell Choir.

A mixture of familiar songs and some soon-to-become favorites will be performed by the Concert Band, including “Just a Closer Walk With Thee,” “Amazing Grace,” “Princeton Variations,” “On a Hymnsong of Philip Bliss” and “Variations on an Ancient Hymn.”

A gospel flavor will be found in the performance of the Jazz Band, whose repertoire will include “Down by the Riverside,” “Gospel John,” “Time to Testify,” “Gospel” and “I Will Follow Him.”
A beautiful arrangement of “The Prayer” and a unique interpretation of “I’ll Fly Away,” will highlight the performance by the Handbell Choir, which will also be performing “Keep Your Lamps (Trimmed and Burning)” and “Siyahamba.”

The band program began in 2010 with the formation of a pep band and has grown to include a Marching Band, Concert Band, Jazz Band, Handbell Choir and various small ensembles. The Band Program hosts three concerts each year, a Christmas performance and programs in the winter and the spring. In addition, each of the major groups as well as small ensembles have performed in community events such as the Greeneville Christmas Parade, the Old Oak Festival and the Laughlin Hospital Foundation’s Derby Days event.

 

Sacred and gospel music will be featured in the Winter Concert of the Tusculum College Band Program on Tuesday, Feb. 28, in the auditorium of the Annie Hogan Byrd Fine Arts Building.

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Tusculum Board of Trustees encourage unity and diversity through resolution

Tusculum Board of Trustees encourage unity and diversity through resolution

Posted on 21 February 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

The Tusculum College Board of Trustees approved a Resolution of Unity at their meeting held Saturday, Feb. 18, on the college’s Greeneville campus. This was the 688th meeting of the Board of Trustees.

The resolution, signed by Board of Trustees Chair Kenneth A. Bowman, Secretary Mark Williams and President Nancy Moody, addressed “recent national actions taken to promote national safety and security which have resulted in concern for members of the Tusculum College community due to the impact on individuals and the uncertainty at hand.”

Dr. Bowman, a 1970 graduate of Tusculum, stated that the college’s practice of diversity and inclusion have enriched the college’s ability to achieve the mission to provide “a liberal arts education in a Judeo-Christian and civic arts environment, with pathways for career preparation, personal development and civic engagement;” and “the attainment of each of the elements of our mission is enhanced by the contributions of each member of our Tusculum community, our students, staff, faculty, alumni, board members, donors and others within the broader community. He added that each member of the Tusculum community enriches the ‘Tusculum Experience,’ and the loss of any member of our community is seen as a thread pulled from the college’s rich tapestry.”

The resolution encouraged every member of the Tusculum Community to look to the civic arts tradition in daily interactions and that each individual take personal responsibility for preserving this inclusive environment where respectful exchange and the exploration of ideas not only contribute to knowledge, but also to social, physical, intellectual, emotional and spiritual growth and development.

Dr. Jason Pierce, vice president of academic affairs, reported to the Board’s Academic Affairs Committee that there are more than a dozen approved search committees, many for positions tied to new programs approved by the Board at the October meeting.

New programs beginning this fall include the Master of Accountancy, pending approval by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges.

Graduates of the Master of Accountancy program have multiple career options including, but not limited to, forensic accounting, public accounting, auditing and compliance accounting, government accounting, and tax and payroll accounting.  According to Dr. Michael Dillon, dean of the School of Business and associate professor of business, earning a graduate degree in accounting is a common practice for those seeking attainment of a Certified Public Accounting license.

“The Tusculum College Master of Accountancy program was developed to provide students with a deeper and broader accounting education that prepares them for advanced career opportunities and preparation for the new set of CPA exams effective spring 2017,” said Dr. Dillon. “The Master of Accountancy program will be led by faculty that are highly qualified academically, but who also bring their extensive real world experience to the classroom.”

Also beginning this fall will be the Master of Arts degree in education: talent development and the Bachelor of Arts degree in talent development. The master’s program will be offered through the Graduate and Professional Studies program, while the bachelor’s degree program will be offered in both traditional and adult student programs.

According to Dr. Tricia Hunsader, dean of the school of education, career opportunities for persons holding this degree include corporate trainers, project managers, strategic planners, team developers, process analysts and performance improvement consultants, all of which are needed by a wide variety of organizations.

“The curriculum addresses the major segments of the talent development field by focusing on concepts, models, skills and methods. Courses are designed so that theoretical foundations are complemented with practice and application that enable students to build skills and competence,” said Dr. Hunsader.

The master’s degree program will be exclusively offered in a fully-online format. The master’s level talent development program is designed to lead students to develop training materials and programs based upon curricular and instructional design best practices, assess organizational needs for enhancing performance, apply adult learning theory and the Instructional System Design model into practice for organizational learning needs, as well as evaluate learning and impact of learning and develop team behaviors and leadership.

The bachelor’s degree program will be offered in two formats, one a fully online program and the other a hybrid program composed of a combination of online coursework and in class instruction.

Other new programs include a Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Management and new majors in chemistry, environmental studies, environmental science and information technology.

Board members also heard a report on current and anticipated enrollment numbers. In the enrollment report, it stated that new students for spring 2017 included 42 in the residential program and 134 in the Graduate and Professional Studies program.

For the residential program, admissions representatives are currently reviewing 1,799 applications which add been received as of Feb. 8, in anticipation of an incoming fall class of approximately 425 new students.

“Tusculum College’s residential program continues to grow for a number of reasons,” said Dr. Nancy B. Moody president of Tusculum College. “Our unique Civic Arts focus takes the liberal arts a step further in a nationally recognized approach to educating individuals of integrity and ideals. Additionally a wide range of majors – from museum studies to nursing – are combined with service learning and travel opportunities to create a completely unique environment.”

Two faculty promotions were approved including Dr. Peter Noll, who was promoted to the rank of associate professor of public history and museum studies, and Dr. Travis Williams, who was promoted to the rank of associate professor of religion.

The Board also approved May 2017 graduates pending satisfactory completion of programs of student and certification by the Registrar.

The next meeting of the Tusculum College Board of Trustees will be May 2017.

 

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Second Theologian-in-Residence session explores new method for scholastic study of the gospels

Second Theologian-in-Residence session explores new method for scholastic study of the gospels

Posted on 16 February 2017 by eestes@tusculum.edu

Dr. Travis Williams explored recent memory research and how it provides parameters for a different scholastic method for study of the gospels during the second session of the annual Theologian-in-Residence lecture series.

Insights from recent research into the memory process and how they can be used in the scholastic approach to discover the “historic Jesus” were explored Tuesday during the second session of the Theologian-in-Residence series at Tusculum College.

“Jesus in Early Christian Memory: Remember, Reconstructing and Rehearsing the Past,” is the focus of this year’s series, being presented by Dr. Travis Williams, assistant professor of religion at Tusculum College. In its 26th year, the series is sponsored by Tusculum College with support from Ron Smith.

Critics of the authenticity of the gospels and the apologists who defend the factual nature of the gospels agree that there has been some distortion of the gospels in their transmission, but how much distortion is the issue that divides the two groups, according to Dr. Williams.

“The foundation of the majority of the scholarly research on the historic Jesus has been based on the assumption that something has been changed,” he said. “The goal is to separate the factual material from the layers of interpretation to find the raw fact.”

As an example of recent academic research, Dr. Williams noted the work of the Jesus Seminar, a group of scholars that began meeting in the 1980s and became well known in the 1990s with the goal of trying to determine which sayings and deeds of Jesus recorded in the gospels are authentic and making this general public aware of these scholarly studies.

The problem with the Jesus Seminar and the majority of other recent academic research into the historic Jesus is the method used in the effort to find the factual Jesus, Dr. Williams said.

“I would suggest that their scholarly search for the factual Jesus is misguided,” he continued. “If they are searching for authentic memories of Jesus, undiluted memories without any layers of interpretation, I would argue that they are going to be searching in vain. Those memories don’t exist.”

In the older view of memory, the brain is seen as storing memories in a singular place, analogous to a filing cabinet, he explained, with memory as a passive intellectual recall of factual details from the past. If this idea is applied to the Jesus stories, it would be that the disciples would have filed their memories of Jesus away and then recalled them as they told others.

However, Dr. Williams said, recent research into the memory process has shown that memory is by its nature distorted. This research has shown that the storage and retrieval of memories is a complex process in which an individual must reconstruct a memory from various sensory areas of the brain and is altered each time a person remembers as the memory is perceived in relation to a person’s current circumstances.

These insights into memory help provide two benefits in the scholarly analysis of the Jesus stories, he continued.

One is that it helps people avoid simplistic debates about the authenticity of memory in the gospels. “If distortion of memories of Jesus is the criteria that is used, then nothing qualifies as authentic, because no memory provides an uninterpreted view of the past,” Dr. Williams said. “If there are no undistorted memories, the foundation for both sides falls apart.”

While distortion has a negative connotation, there are positive benefits to distortion, he said.

Telescopes use a distortion of light to allow people to see planets, stars and other heavenly bodies that cannot be seen with a naked eye. Likewise, memories help people reconstruct a past that cannot be physically revisited, Dr. Williams explained, because memory distorts the distance between the present and the past and allows people to see what would otherwise be unrecoverable.

Secondly, distortion provides new ways to understand the variability of memories, Dr. Williams said, in relation to memory’s adaptive function to provide guidance in how to react in new situations.

“The early Christians were comfortable with the variations in the Jesus stories,” Dr. Williams said, giving as an example the debate amongst early Christians of whether the Jewish law should be observed or not, which is recounted in the book of Acts and Paul’s letters to the early church. This debate took place prior to the writing of the gospels, and a passage from Mark is written in such a way to support the view that the Jewish law should not have to be observed by Christians while that wording is not found in Matthew’s gospel, which most scholars agree is targeted toward a Jewish audience.

However, once the written form of the gospels replaced the oral form, much of this adaptive function was lost as the memory of Jesus became cemented in permanent forms,  he said.

In the next session of the series on Tuesday, Feb. 21, Dr. Williams will continue the exploration of this new approach to the Jesus stories with a discussion of another facet of memory, the impact of social environment on the construction of memories. The session will include an examination of the role of eyewitnesses in the formation and dissemination of the early Jesus tradition. The lecture will begin at 10 a.m. in the Chalmers Conference Center in the Niswonger Commons on the Tusculum College campus. Reservations are requested. Please call 423-636-7304 to make a reservation or email eestes@tusculum.edu.

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Disney’s ‘My Son Pinocchio, JR’ opens Friday

Disney’s ‘My Son Pinocchio, JR’ opens Friday

Posted on 15 February 2017 by eestes@tusculum.edu

Professore Buonragazzo (Carter DelSorbo) welcomes Geppetto (Parker Bunch) to the land of Idyllia where he has developed a machine to make ‘the perfect children’ in this scene from the play.

More than 30 of the area’s finest young performers will fill the stage to present Disney’s “My Son Pinocchio, JR” during the last two weekends of February at Tusculum College.

Theatre-at-Tusculum and Actors Coming Together will present the musical in the Behan Arena Theatre in the lower level (side entrance) of the Annie Hogan Byrd Fine Arts Building on the Tusculum College campus. Show times are 7 p.m. on Feb. 17-18, 23-25 and 2 p.m. on Feb. 19 and 26.

“My Son Pinocchio, JR” is based in part on the classic Walt Disney animated feature film “Pinocchio.” It is presented through special arrangement with Music Theatre International and is part of the Broadway Junior Collection. The musical includes the songs “When You Wish Upon a Star” and “I’ve Got No Strings” by Leigh Harline and Ned Washington from the animated film.

However, unlike the animated film, the stage production is told from the perspective of Geppetto rather than Pinocchio, similar to the 2000 Disney live-action television movie “Geppetto,” which featured Drew Carey. The musical includes music and lyrics by award-winning composer Stephen Schwartz (Broadway’s “Wicked” and Disney’s “Pocahontas,” “The Prince of Egypt” and “Enchanted”) and book by David Stern.

Under the direction of Marilyn duBrisk and Assistant Director Brian Ricker, the all youth cast consists of an assortment of first-time and veteran actors. Griffin Gricunas, a fourth grader at Hal Henard Elementary School, will be making his Tusculum stage debut as the title character, Pinocchio. Gricunas will play alongside local favorite Parker Bunch who portrays Geppetto, the lonely toymaker who longs for a son. Another Bunch is helping lead the cast, as Parker’s younger sister, Reagan Bunch takes on the role of the wish-granting Blue Fairy.

The show is truly a family affair with six sets of brothers and sisters featured in the cast, and even a set of cousins. The junior fairies will be played by Tusculum View fifth grader, Emma Waddell, sisters Jade Ward and Jorja Ward, both fourth graders at Hal Henard Elementary, and Anna Woods, a fourth grader at Providence Academy in Johnson City.

The Fairies in training perform “When You Wish Upon A Star” and celebrate The Blue Fairy’s record of 100 wishes granted…or so they think. From left are Viola (Jade Ward), The Blue Fairy (Reagan Bunch), Rosa (Anna Woods) and Arancia (Emma Waddell). (Photos courtesy of Carrie Tucker)

Other cast members include Greeneville High School senior Grayson Reed as the wicked Puppet Master Stromboli with his dancing marionettes played by EastView fifth grader Leah Beddingfield and Doak Elementary fourth grader Carter Copeland. Tusculum College students Carter DelSorbo of Greeneville and Emma McCuiston of Chattanooga will play Professore Buonragazzo and the Pleasure Island Ringleader respectively.

The rest of the cast members play multiple roles throughout the show. They include Doak Elementary students Aliah Campbell and Aden Moore; EastView Elementary students Trey Bailey, Elliott Tucker and Zach Wallin; Greeneville Middle School students Jackson Beddingfield, Mylee Doty, Maya Gricunas, Maggie Hartman, Claire Hoeke, Carissa Hopson, Lexi Humbert, Amora Klepper, Caedmon Oakes, Allie Shelto, and Todd Wallin; Hal Henard Elementary students Grace Lampe and Jack Lampe; Tusculum View second grader Lily Broyles, as well as GHS freshman Angel Klepper, West Greene High School freshman Elijah Collins and Emmaline Neas, a sophomore from Parrotsville.

The production staff includes Angie Clendenon, music director; Kasie Shelnutt, accompanist; Kim Berry, choreographer; Frank Mengel and Garry Renfro, light and set design; Barbara Holt, costume director; Suzanne Greene, stage manager; Trenda Berney, make-up director, and Jennifer Hollowell, box office manager.

Tickets to the musical are $15 for adults, $12 for seniors 60 and over, and $5 for children 12 and under.  To reserve tickets, please call 423-798-1620 or email jhollowell@tusculum.edu.

 

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RyanErika

Love is in the air at Tusculum

Posted on 14 February 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

Erika and I were both a part of the history and museum studies department on campus, so we had classes together since her freshman year (her being a year younger than me). While we knew each other, we never really hung out or got to know one another.

My first senior year, a psychology major, Robert Arrowood conspired to split an apartment between him, Erika’s brother Ian, Oliver Hancock, Chris Smith, and myself. That year, Erika and I both took Dr. Van Amberg’s class on medieval Europe, and took a trip to Norway. It was shortly after that trip that Ian started harassing Erika for not spending time with him, so we started having these ritual weekend movie marathons.

Erika and I started getting to know one another, we started studying together, and our separate crowds of friends started merging a little bit.

I remember Valentine ’s Day that year, my apartment, Erika, and a couple friends decided that since we were all single, we’d go out on a group date to Applebee’s and the movies. It was kind of funny, right before we left the apartment, Erika and one of the other girls in the apartment were talking about who was cute in the apartment and Erika said she could never date anyone who lived with her brother.

Two weeks later at the SGA meeting, I asked Erika out, and she shot me down. I like to think I took it in stride. That night we, as a group, went to watch Robo Cop at the theater in Greeneville because it was $5 movie night. Sometime between the meeting and movie, Erika changed her mind. She sent me a text during the movie letting me know she wanted to try giving a relationship a shot.

As for plans, Erika finished her masters in historical administration in December and is currently working part time for three different museums with hopes of finding a museum to employ her full time.

I’m hoping to start graduate school in the fall and work on my masters and eventually Ph.D. in history. I want to work in higher education, starting by teaching and then moving over to administration. Other than then that, we’re getting married on campus in May.

 

 

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Appointments are still available for free tax program offered through Tusculum

Appointments are still available for free tax program offered through Tusculum

Posted on 13 February 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

Free tax preparation and filing services, offered by Tusculum College’s new Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program, are still available by appointment for residents in Greene and surrounding counties.

The IRS-certified tax preparation program currently provides two locations in Greene County, as well as a location in Gray  where trained volunteers are available to assist members of the public with the preparation of their tax returns and to answer any tax questions they may have.

Locations include: Monday nights at Appalachian Community Federal Credit Union’s community room in Gray, Thursdays at Tusculum College and Saturdays at Greeneville Power and Light. Appointments are available through April 13.

Led by Dr. Harold Branstrator, associate professor of management at Tusculum College, the VITA program offers a free alternative to the expensive services of a paid tax professional. The student volunteers of the VITA program have completed roughly 1,000 returns annually since 2014, often saving clients $200 or more that they would have spent on payments for alternative, fee-based, services.

“There are still appointments available in Greene County at both the Tusculum and Greeneville Light and Power System sites,” said Dr. Branstrator. “We encourage anyone who qualifies to take advantage of this free, professional program with IRS-trained volunteers. There is no expense to the filer to have their federal income tax prepared and filed.”

Taxpayers eligible for VITA services include: individuals with annual incomes of less than $54,000, individuals over 55 years of age, individuals diagnosed with a physical disability and non English-speaking citizens.

Under the supervision of Dr. Branstrator, a former IRS employee, participants’ tax returns are prepared by Tusculum students who have completed a VITA-standard three-week certification process that facilitates their ability to meet the high level professional standards expected by the IRS.

Dr. Branstrator said the program has also helped students, particularly those in business-related fields of study, acquire real world experience that they could not obtain in the classroom.

Appointments are required. Sites and days of operation include:

Mondays: ACFCU, 5034 Bobby Hicks Highway, Gray, TN 5:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m.;

Thursdays: Tusculum College, Chalmers Conference Center in the Niswonger Commons, Greeneville, TN, 5:30-8:30 p.m.;

Saturdays: Greeneville Power and Light System Boardroom, 110 N. College St., Greeneville, TN 9 a.m. – noon.

To schedule an appointment, call (800) 378-3778 and wait for the operator, or register online at www.tusculum.edu/vita/.

 


 

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New degree programs starting in the fall

New degree programs starting in the fall

Posted on 08 February 2017 by eestes@tusculum.edu

Tusculum College has several new degree programs coming next fall. Starting in August 2017 will be Bachelor’s programs in health care management and talent development as well as a Master program in accountancy.

Health Care Management

The Bachelor of Science in healthcare management is designed to prepare graduates for entry-level positions that manage day-to-day operations of healthcare organizations by giving them a firm foundation in the core disciplines of healthcare administration and management.

The program with be offered through both the traditional day program and the Graduate and Professional Studies program. The GPS program is a fully online program and may be completed in 21 months.

According to Dr. Lois Ewen, dean of the School of Nursing, Health Sciences and Human Services and professor of nursing, career opportunities for persons holding a Bachelor of Science in healthcare management can be found within a variety of healthcare organizations such as hospitals, long-term care facilities, public health agencies, outpatient facilities and doctors’ offices.

“Healthcare continues to be a dynamic and growing industry. Increased government involvement, new technology and changing population demographics have caused the business of healthcare to evolve, as well,” said Dr. Ewen. “With the industry facing a greater need for quality care, increased competition, decreasing financial reimbursements for provided services and the need to closely monitor costs, healthcare managers and providers are being challenged to operate more like traditional businesses, weighing how their decisions impact the quality of healthcare while assessing them from a business perspective.”

The bachelor’s degree in healthcare management at Tusculum College intentionally combines business and healthcare administration courses with the goal of preparing graduates to take advantage of the healthcare industry’s movement towards a more traditional business model, according to Dr. Michael Dillon, dean of the School of Business and associate professor of business.

The program is designed for anyone who would like to begin a career or advance their current career in healthcare and is a particularly good opportunity for current healthcare employees who have already earned an associate degree in a healthcare technical field but require a bachelor’s degree to seek a managerial position.

According to a survey by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, careers within the healthcare management field are expected to grow nearly 17 percent through the year 2024, 10 percent faster than the total national employment average, which is 6.5 percent. Additionally, the survey notes the median pay for medical and health service managers is $94,000 per year.

Talent Development

Tusculum College will begin both a Bachelor’s degree program in talent development and a Master of Arts degree in education: talent development program. The master’s program was previously called the Human Resource Development program.

Applications are being accepted now for both programs for the first semester of the programs. The master’s program will be offered through the Graduate and Professional Studies program, while the bachelor’s degree program will be offered in both traditional and adult student programs.

According to Dr. Tricia Hunsader, dean of the school of education, career opportunities for persons holding this degree include corporate trainers, project managers, strategic planners, team developers, process analysts and performance improvement consultants, all of which are needed by a wide variety of organizations.

“The curriculum addresses the major segments of the talent development field by focusing on concepts, models, skills and methods. Courses are designed so that theoretical foundations are complemented with practice and application that enable students to build skills and competence,” said Dr. Hunsader.

The master’s degree program will be exclusively offered in a fully-online format.

The master’s level talent development program is designed to lead students to develop training materials and programs based upon curricular and instructional design best practices, assess organizational needs for enhancing performance, apply adult learning theory and the Instructional System Design model into practice for organizational learning needs, as well as evaluate learning and impact of learning and develop team behaviors and leadership.

The bachelor’s degree program will be offered in two formats, one a fully online program and the other a hybrid program composed of a combination of online coursework and in class instruction.

According to Dr. Hunsader, the bachelor’s degree in talent development at Tusculum College will prepare students to work in organizations as entry level training and talent development. As they work towards the completion of their degree, students will develop skills in human resource development and training, instructional design, curriculum design, leadership, employee evaluation and adult learning.

For more information on these programs, contact Katie Tassell, senior enrollment representative, at 888.488.7285.

 

Master of Accountancy

Tusculum College has announced a new Master of Accountancy program beginning fall 2017, pending approval by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges.

Graduates of the Master of Accountancy program have multiple career options including, but not limited to, forensic accounting, public accounting, auditing and compliance accounting, government accounting, and tax and payroll accounting.

According to Dr. Michael Dillon, dean of the School of Business and associate professor of business, earning a graduate degree in accounting is a common practice for those seeking attainment of a Certified Public Accounting license.

“The Tusculum College Master of Accountancy program was developed to provide students with a deeper and broader accounting education that prepares them for advanced career opportunities and preparation for the new set of CPA exams effective spring 2017,” said Dr. Dillon. “The Master of Accountancy program will be led by faculty that are highly qualified academically, but who also bring their extensive real world experience to the classroom.”

In the State of Tennessee, the requirements for application to complete the Certified Public Accounting examination were changed in March 2016, resulting in the requirement of 150 academic credit hours being removed. To sit for the CPA exam, candidates must now have a baccalaureate or higher degree with a major in accounting or a baccalaureate or higher degree with a major other than accounting which includes at least 30 semester credit hours in accounting (at least 24 credit hours in upper level coursework) and at least 24 semester credit hours in general business. The requirement of 150 academic credit hours is still required for the CPA license.

According to Dr. Dillon, the Tusculum College Master of Accountancy program curriculum was developed based on the announced changes to the 2017 CPA testing requirements.

“The program is an excellent option for new accounting undergraduates,” he said. “The program is also an excellent option for students who earned a business degree with some accounting coursework but need additional upper level accounting hours, or students who completed an undergraduate accounting program but have been out of the classroom for many years and need an up-to-date modern accounting curriculum.”

The Master of Accountancy program will be under Graduate and Professional Studies at Tusculum College.  While most Graduate and Professional Studies are designed for non-traditional, evening students, the Master of Accountancy program will be offered during the day.  Initially, the program will be offered at the Greeneville campus and at the Knoxville Regional Center simultaneously. The program is designed to be a one-year, full-time program beginning in the fall term and ending at the end of the summer term. The curriculum will be delivered during two afternoons each week.

 

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