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Class of 1966 to be special guests on campus during Spring Commencement weekend

Class of 1966 to be special guests on campus during Spring Commencement weekend

Posted on 29 April 2016 by eestes@tusculum.edu

Members of the Class of 1966 will be in the spotlight next weekend as they reunite on campus to celebrate their 50th anniversary year.

Special events are planned on both May 6 and 7 to bring the newest Golden Pioneers back together on campus to mark this milestone for the Class of 1966.

The Golden Pioneer celebrations occur during the spring commencement weekend and include recognition and social celebration, that includes a reception at the President’s House.

Donning a golden cap and gown, each participant is presenting a commemorative medallion and be recognized by for their dedication and loyalty to the College for the past 50 years. The class members participate in the Commencement processional and will be recognized during the ceremony from the podium.

Below is the agenda for the Golden Pioneers for May 2016 Commencement:

 

Friday, May 6

3 – 5 p.m. – Tours of Tusculum

5 to 6 p.m. – Reception with Dr. Nancy B. Moody and Mr. Tom F. Moody at the President’s house with Medallion Ceremony

6:30 p.m. – Dinner at The Brumley’s Restaurant in the General Morgan Inn (Dutch Treat)

 

Saturday, May 7

8:30 a.m. – Breakfast in the Pioneer Perk, Niswonger Commons

10 a.m. – Commencement Ceremony, Pioneer Arena, Niswonger Commons

Following Commencement – Golden Pioneer Luncheon in the Pioneer Perk

Members of the Class of 1966 can register for these events by visiting this page.

 

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Tusculum event coming to D.C. area soon

Tusculum event coming to D.C. area soon

Posted on 29 April 2016 by eestes@tusculum.edu

If you will be in the Washington, D. C. area next week, make plans to attend the upcoming alumni event on Tuesday, May 3. Alumni are invited to visit with Tusculum President Nancy B. Moody and learn about all the exciting developments at the College, including the construction progress for the new center for science and math (above).

Alumni will gather at 7 p.m at The Atrium inside the Crystal Gateway Marriott (1700 Jefferson Davis Hwy., Arlington, VA 2202).  Meals will be Dutch treat. Please RSVP to the Office of Alumni Relations at 423.636.7303, 800.729.0256 ext. 5303 or bsell@tusculum.edu.

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Tusculum alum referees in NCAA women’s basketball championship

Tusculum alum referees in NCAA women’s basketball championship

Posted on 27 April 2016 by eestes@tusculum.edu

Beverly Roberts

When the University of Connecticut defeated Syracuse University, on Tuesday, April 5, during the NCAA Women’s Basketball Championship game, a Tusculum College alumna was right in the middle of the action.

Beverly Roberts ’90 was selected to serve as one of the game officials at this year’s Women’s Final Four, held in Indianapolis. Roberts was one of the three referees working the national title game at Bankers Life Fieldhouse, shown on ESPN.

Serving as referee in big games is not new for the Kingsport native. She officiated the 2008 NCAA Final Four in Tampa, FL, and has worked in 10 consecutive NCAA tournaments. This was her first national championship game. Roberts officiates women’s games in the Big Ten, Big 12, Missouri Valley Conference, Southeastern Conference and Conference USA.

Officiating runs in the family. Beverly’s father, Garry Roberts, is a basketball official in the South Atlantic Conference.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

’50s

Rev. Don Wright ’53 has just finished serving as temporary pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Dearborn, MI. He has filled in for more than a year as the church searched for a new pastor. Don is Pastor Emeritus of this church and this was his third time to minister to the congregation. With his 57 years of service, the Presbytery continues to use his service to assist churches in need. Don met his wife Dorothy (Jaynes) ’54 at Tusculum and they married on his graduation day. The Wrights live near their daughter Debbie. Their oldest son, Alan, owns a software company in California; their middle son Doug is compliance officer for an investment company, and their youngest son Dean is vice president of MGM.

 

’90s

Brian Click ’99 of Greeneville, TN, has realized a longtime dream with the opening of Cornerstone Wealth Management Group with partner Chris O’Dell. The new business will offer such services as comprehensive financial management, from 401(k)s, IRAs and retirement preparation to college planning and investments, as well as some insurance services. Click has been a certified financial planner for 17 years. As part of the new business, the partners took a vacant building that had been the location of a popular locally owned store, renovating it and returning it to useful life in the community.

 

’00s

Jeremy Parrott ’00 has been named the new head coach of the Bearden Bulldogs boy’s basketball program in Knoxville, TN. Jeremy had taught  history and driver’s education courses at Cherokee High School in Rogersville, TN, as well as served 15 years as the head boy’s basketball coach there. He is the longest tenured head basketball coach and his teams have recorded the most consecutive winning seasons in school history. Jeremy has served as the chairman of the Basketball Coaches for the Intermountain Athletic Conference since 2006. He was voted Coach of the Year in District II AAA in 2006-07 and was chosen Lakeway Area Coach of the Year in 2011-12. That year, his team made it to the state tournament, the only team to ever do so at Cherokee.

 

 

 

 

’40s

Elizabeth Taylor Duggins ’41 of Greeneville, TN, passed away April 17, 2016. Mrs. Duggins was a lifelong resident of Greeneville and Tusculum and a retired educator who served both the Greeneville and Greene County school systems. Mrs. Duggins began her career working in a two-room school in the Sinking Springs community. She was known as a champion of troubled students and a favorite English teacher and counselor to generations. Always ready to listen with equal measures of caring and humor, Mrs. Duggins was sought out both by students and parents as well as other adults who showed up at her back door under the cover of darkness looking for a sympathetic ear and wise council. She could not get enough of the beauty of Greene County and the Unaka Mountains, and after she gave up driving was always ready for a ride in the countryside or nearby mountains. Her survivors include sister and Tusculum alumna Marjorie Bright ’59.

 

’60s

Delia Swain Acuff ’60 of Greeneville, TN, passed away March 31, 2016. Mrs. Acuff was retired teacher and principal of Greeneville Middle School. She was a member of Tusculum Baptist Church. Mrs. Acuff was a member of the Retired Teachers Association and the Greene County Democrat Party. She had a desire to travel, having visited all 50 states. She also traveled around the world. In the 1970s, she went India and Poland, trips that were sponsored by the State of Tennessee.Mrs. Acuff devoted her time to the Alliance for Mental Health and was affiliated with NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Health) and TAMI (Tennessee Alliance on Mental Health). She was instrumental in establishing the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) of Greene County. In addition to traveling, she also enjoyed her flower gardens, sewing, politics and cats.

 

Tony M. Seay Jr. ’66 of Mosheim, TN, passed away on April 24, 2016. Mr. Seay was a career educator, having taught at Mosheim Elementary School.

’80s

The Rev. Dr. Roy E. Blakeburn ’84 of Greeneville, TN, passed away April 14, 2016. Dr. Blakeburn served 54 years as an ordained Cumberland Presbyterian minister, with 35 of those years in Greeneville. He also served churches in Oklahoma, Arkansas and Tennessee. Dr. Blakeburn served the church in other capacities including associate secretary of the Board of Home Missions, General Assembly commissioner, moderator of the General Assembly, stated clerk of the General Assembly and co-chair of the Committee to Revise the Confession of Faith of 1984. Dr. Blakeburn was the author of two study books: “The Presence, the People, and the Journey,” and “The Holy Spirit Comes Through the Word,” as well as several articles for “The Cumberland Presbyterian” magazine and the “Missionary Messenger.” He published two books of his selected sermons: “God, Gabriel and the Cannonball” and “Faithful Living Outside the Box.”

 

’90s

Sherri Lee Taylor ’99 of Greeneville, TN, passed away April 4, 2016. Ms. Taylor worked for the U.S. Postal Service. She was a member of First Christian Church and a member of Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks Lodge No. 1653.

 

Faculty

William Thomas “Bill” Brimer of Chuckey, TN, who was a professor of mathematics at Tusculum, passed away of pancreatic cancer on April 8, 2016, at his home surrounded by loved ones. Mr. Brimer formerly taught and coached wrestling, football and track at Greeneville High School, Tennessee High School and Morristown West High School. He also served as the minister of music at Tusculum Baptist Church, where he was a member.  His final days included visits from hundreds of friends, family, wrestlers, former students, and colleagues thanking him for the impact of his humble, yet powerful influence upon their lives. In keeping with his life’s work, among his last words were; “Keep making a difference in people’s lives.”

Friends

Loyce “Sue” C. Raber of Colonial Heights, TN, passed away on April 5, 2016, after an an extended illness. Mrs. Raber was the wife of Dr. Donald R. Raber H’13, who serves on the Tusculum College Board of Trustees. Born in Brooklyn, New York, Mrs. Raber had lived in Kingsport since 1981. She was a loving homemaker and long term officer of Aldebaran Financial. She was a member of First Presbyterian Church. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Loyce and August Ritzler Scholarship Fund, Tusculum College, 60 Shiloh Road, Greeneville, Tennessee 37743, which the Rabers established and named in honor of Mrs. Raber’s parents.

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Spring Commencement will be Saturday, May 7

Spring Commencement will be Saturday, May 7

Posted on 13 April 2016 by eestes@tusculum.edu

May 7 will mark a milestone for about 350 Tusculum College students who will reach the successful completion of their educational journey by earning degrees during the Spring Commencement Ceremony that day.

Two ceremonies are planned and both will take place in the Pioneer Arena of the Niswonger Commons. The first will be at 10 a.m. and will include students earning degrees from the Traditional College program. The second will be at 2 p.m. and include students earning Master’s degrees and the students earning degrees from the Graduate and Professional Studies bachelor’s programs.

Tusculum College applauds the graduates for their hard-earned achievements and is preparing for May 7 as a day of celebration for the newest alumni and their families. The College is busy making preparations to make the day a memorable one and you can help.

Family members are asked to carpool if possible rather than bring multiple cars to the ceremony to help lessen congestion on campus. As you arrive on campus, security personnel will direct you to a parking area and shuttles will provided from outer lots to the Niswonger Commons.

If you are any of your family members or guests requires special handicapped seating accommodations, please contact Bobbie Greenway at 423-636-7300 ext. 5154 so your needs can be addressed. There will be handicapped parking available in the large parking lot at the Niswonger Commons. Please let the security personnel directing traffic and parking know that you need handicapped parking if it is needed and they will direct you to the lot. Please note that Tusculum will not be able to provide wheelchairs. Those with special seating accommodations are asked to arrive at least 45 minutes prior to the beginning of the ceremony.

You can also help by helping your graduate be at the Pioneer Arena in time for graduation practice. For the morning ceremony, practice begins at 8:45 a.m. and it begins 12:45 p.m. for the 2 p.m. ceremony. Graduates who arrive prior to the practice times are asked to report to the cafeteria.

Graduates are not allowed to have personnel items such as purses and cameras with them during the ceremony. You can assist them by obtaining these items from them prior to graduation practice and holding them.  Prior to the practice is a good time for this and other communication between you and your graduate because after graduation practice, the graduates go to the cafeteria where they placed in order for the procession and for the ceremony. It is easier for the College staff getting the graduates in line if they stay inside the cafeteria during this period.

The Pioneer Arena will open for guest seating after completion of the rehearsal. Guests are asked to arrive at least 30 minutes prior to the beginning of the ceremony.

No tickets are required for graduation and there is no limit on the number of guests per graduate. However, to help provide seating for all, guests are asked to not hold seats for others in the last 45 minutes prior to the beginning of the ceremony.

Programs will be placed on the seat of each graduate and they will be distributed to guests at the Pioneer Arena primary entrances. The program will also posted on the Tusculum web site following the ceremony. For graduates unable to attend the ceremony, diplomas will be mailed to the graduates’ home addresses after Commencement Day provided all academic and financial obligations are satisfied.

To help preserve the prestigious decorum of the commencement ceremony, guests are asked to observe the following:

  • As a courtesy to other attendees, please consider making alternative arrangements for very young children.  Due to fire marshal regulations, no baby carriers or strollers will be allowed in the auditorium.
  • Cell phones are to be turned off or switched to the silent operating mode during the ceremony.  Do not speak on a cell phone or carry on a conversation during the ceremony as this prevents others from hearing and enjoying the ceremony.
  • Commencement is both a joyous and solemn event.  Please express your excitement in ways that will not prevent others from hearing the speaker and enjoying the ceremony.  Use of air horns, yelling or stomping are disruptive.
  • Please refrain from taking pictures until after your graduate receives his or her diploma.  This will allow the ceremony to flow smoothly and reduce the distractions and disturbances to other audience members as they try to see and hear ongoing presentations.
  • As a courtesy to and out of respect for your fellow graduates, you and your family are requested to remain in the auditorium until the conclusion of the ceremony. At the conclusion of the ceremony, the faculty traditionally forms a gauntlet and applauds the graduates as they recess from the auditorium.  We ask that your family and friends be respectful of this tradition and remain in the auditorium until the graduates have exited the auditorium.

 

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Tusculum places in top 10 in “Up to Us” national competition

Tusculum places in top 10 in “Up to Us” national competition

Posted on 12 April 2016 by srichey@tusculum.edu

A team of students from Tusculum College was awarded fifth place in the fourth annual Up to Us campus competition.

Up to Us is a project coordinated by Net Impact, working in partnership with the Peter. G. Petersen Foundation and the Clinton Global Initiative. The organization provides an opportunity to college students to educate their peers on issues stemming from the national debt, giving students the chance to speak up and make an impact on the nation’s long-term fiscal and economic health.

During the 2016 Up to Us campaign, 230 students on 53 teams in 28 states worked on their individual campuses to engage other students in understanding the national debt through in-person outreach, events and activities on campus.

“It’s been a rewarding experience,” said Michael Fernando, a senior Tusculum College student from Sri Lanka majoring in accounting, general management and economics and international business, who headed the effort at Tusculum College. “After we were invited to participate in Up to Us, such a prestigious competition, I knew we would have to give it all we had. We had a great team, and I am glad that we were as successful as we were.”

According to Fernando, Tusculum College participated in the campaign from October 22, 2015 through February 21, 2016, launching weeks of creative, non-partisan and thought-provoking campus campaigns to raise awareness of the impact of America’s long-term national debt.

The Tusculum College team led some innovative campaign strategies, including a TED Talk style forum regarding the national debt, he said. Students participated in the project “Money Doesn’t Grow on Trees,” during which they made signs detailing how they cared about the national debt and hung them around trees on the Greeneville campus and even made special announcements during a basketball game.

As part of their award, the team will also be awarded a cash prize, which they have chosen to donate to Tusculum College. The team leaders from the top 10 teams have also been invited to Washington, D.C. to attend the Peter G. Peterson Foundation’s 2016 Fiscal Summit; they will meet with economists and national political leaders to discuss the national debt and its impact on millennials. Fernando also traveled to the University of California, Berkeley to the Clinton Global Initiative University conference in early April where the winning teams were recognized by former President Bill Clinton.

Teams from the 2016 Up to Us campaign were assessed by a panel of judges that included several elite business executives and Chelsea Clinton, vice chair of the Clinton Foundation.

For more information on the Up to Us initiative, visit www.itsuptous.org.

 

By Madilyn Elliott, senior journalism and professional writing major from Hampton

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Music lineup announced for Old Oak Festival, April 15-17

Music lineup announced for Old Oak Festival, April 15-17

Posted on 31 March 2016 by eestes@tusculum.edu

The Carson Peters Band will be returning to the Old Oak Festival.

Fiddlin’ Carson Peters returns again to headline the Old Oak Festival, along with the Smoky Mountain Bluegrass band and a host of regional talent as the event will once again be held on the Tusculum College campus, April 15-17.

The Old Oak Festival features a wide variety of music, food and fun, spanning across three days and featuring something for everyone, be it live music, theater, arts and crafts or fabulous festival food.

Throughout the weekend on stage, the festival will present the sounds of the region, with a wide variety of music from bluegrass to jazz to regionally-known vocalists and musicians. Musicians kicking off the show on Friday include Bean Tree Remedy featuring Ashley Bean, Dave Nunez and the Perfect World Band, Mike Joy, My New Favorites and Prism – a tribute to Pink Floyd. Friday night will also feature Jack & Michael on the Terrace entertaining for an alumni event.

On Saturday, expect good old fashion fun from Shiloh and the Tusculum College Band closing out the night, but also plan to get to the festival early to hear the Stem Winder, the Thursday Night Boys, Jake Keasly & Friends, the Dandy Lions, Absinthe Gray, Jimmie D and the House Rockers and the Madisons.

The Carson Peters Band will be on the main stage on Saturday as well. Additionally on Saturday, some favorite features will be back, including the “Conduct Us” session with the Tusculum College Band, where anyone can step up and take over the conductor’s baton.

Smoky Mountain Bluegrass Band

Sunday’s artists include Jim and Curtis Moneyhun, Steve Brown, the Tusculum College Handbell Choir, the Matthew Hurd Band and the regional favorite, the Smoky Mountain Bluegrass band.

“The musical acts this year will provide a wide variety to suit all musical tastes, with some top rate performances on all three days,” said David Price, festival coordinator and director of music for Tusculum College.

A new feature for the Old Oak Festival this year will be horse and carriage rides, sponsored by Tymley Travel, and a lineup of 10 workshops designed for high school students, through which five participants will be awarded a $500 scholarship.

The high school workshops will be offered in morning and afternoon shifts, from 9-11 a.m. and 12:30-2:30 p.m. The morning workshops will consist of an educational wetland tour and nature writing, contemporary poetry, drawing, playwriting, and music theory and songwriting. Acting, brief essay or prose poem, tree identification, photo manipulation and songwriting will be offered in the afternoon.

Another returning favorite is Joyce Carroll, puppet master. Carroll will be a puppet troubadour, appearing through the festival with spontaneous performances.

As part of the entertainment, there will be three performances during the festival of GLAWPIGT (Great Literature Alive and Well and Playing in Greeneville, Tennessee) Showcase, presented by the group comprised of local students under the direction of Arts Outreach Director Marilyn duBrisk. Show times are Friday at 7 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m.

Performances will be held in the Behan Arena Theatre in the Annie Hogan Byrd Fine Arts Building.

Sponsors of the event include Artistic Printers, Fatz Cafe, The Greeneville Sun, Radio Greeneville and Wayne Thomas.

There is no fee to attend the festival, other than the admission fee to the GLAWPIGT performances. Art vendor hours will be Friday from noon until 6 p.m. Author Row and the food vendors will remain open until 9 p.m. On Saturday, hours will be from 9 a.m. until 6 p.m.  for art vendors and 9 p.m. for the rest of the festival. Sunday hours are 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. For more information, contact Price at 423-636-7303.

Coolers and alcohol are prohibited during the festival.

For updates and more information, visit the website at www.oldoakfestival.org or on facebook.

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Meen Center construction moving into new phase

Meen Center construction moving into new phase

Posted on 30 March 2016 by eestes@tusculum.edu

The construction of the new Ronald H. and Verna June Meen Center for Science and Math is moving into a new phase.

With concreting completed and the majority of the roofing done as well, construction of the Ronald H. and Verna June Meen Center for Science and Math at Tusculum College moves into a new phase with permanent power being set and water proofing, windows and brick beginning.

According to David Martin, director of facilities for Tusculum College, the building is now “dried in” and exterior framing complete.  “Interior framing is at 80 percent and will be completed by early April,” said Martin.

It is expected that the construction will be completed by the end of the year and will be ready for utilization when students return for spring semester 2017.

The Meen Center for Science and Math will be a four-story structure of approximately 100,000 square feet. Interiors include wings for biology, chemistry, mathematics, computer science and environmental science. There will also be lab space and research areas for both faculty and students.

The ground floor features the environmental science wing with a loading dock, as well as large general classroom spaces and classrooms equipped for distance learning programs. A large lecture hall will be included on the ground floor. Space is also allocated to house the Bachelor of Science degree program in nursing and at least one other graduate level health-related program.

Windows have started to be installed as exterior framing is nearing completion.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Classes of 1966-68 to be celebrated during Golden Pioneer events

Classes of 1966-68 to be celebrated during Golden Pioneer events

Posted on 30 March 2016 by eestes@tusculum.edu

Classes of 1966, 1967 and 1968: Tusculum College wants to celebrate you.

Members of each of these classes are encouraged to mark their calendars and make plans to attend  Golden Pioneer events to mark each classes’ 50-year anniversary.

The Class of 1966 will be celebrated during this year’s Golden Pioneer celebration on May 6 – 7.  For more details or to register for the 2016 celebration, please visit this page.

Members of the Class of 1967 will be the focus of the 2017 Golden Pioneer celebration on May 5 – 6 of next year.

Plans are also under way for the celebration for the Class of 1968, which will be May 4 – 5, 2018. 1968 Golden Pioneer Committee members have been chosen and include Cheryl Sykes Eschweiler, Kim Lapsley Muir, Ron L. May, Bob “Goose” Gardner, Carol Moncada Goodman, Frank “Rosie” Horsman, Beverly Brooks Jurkiewicz, Katherine Krebs Serritella and Ken “Hoss” Blackley.

The Golden Pioneer celebrations occur during the spring commencement weekend and include recognition and social celebration, that includes a reception at the President’s House.

Donning a golden cap and gown, each participant is presenting a commemorative medallion and be recognized by for their dedication and loyalty to the College for the past 50 years. The class members participate in the Commencement processional and will be recognized during the ceremony from the podium.

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Washington D.C.-area alumni event coming in May

Washington D.C.-area alumni event coming in May

Posted on 30 March 2016 by eestes@tusculum.edu

Tusculum College is coming to the Washington D.C.-area in May.  If you live or will be in the area, make plans to attend to reconnect with your Alma Mater and fellow alumni!

 

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Dr. Ken Bowman ’70 to retire after distinguished career at Alcoa

Dr. Ken Bowman ’70 to retire after distinguished career at Alcoa

Posted on 30 March 2016 by eestes@tusculum.edu

Dr. Ken Bowman '70

Dr. Ken A. Bowman ’70 will soon be entering a new season of his life as he retires from Alcoa on April 1, after 39 years of dedicated service to the company.

Bowman, who serves his Alma Mater as chair of the Tusculum College Board of Trustees, began his career with Alcoa in 1976, working in the Physical Chemistry, Ingot Casting, Smelting Process Development and Packaging divisions.  In 1992, he transferred to Alcoa’s Rigid Packaging Development Division which evolved to become today’s GRP Center of Excellence for Engineering, Technology and Manufacturing Excellence. At the time of his retirement he was serving as manager of coating technology.

Dr. Bowman holds 17 U.S. patents, and his work has been recognized through several publications, Alcoa Laboratory’s Merit Award for “Job Performance,” and three Arthur Vining Davis Awards for “Team Technical Achievement” (these being the predecessor to the current Impact Awards): 1) The Continuous Melting and Treating System Team in 1986; 2) The Alcoa E-Coat® Team in 1992; and 3) The High Strength Formable Coated End Stock Team in 1996-97.  In addition, his numerous distinctions include serving as program chairman for Alcoa’s Centennial Symposium on Electrochemistry and receiving the Sigma Xi ATC Chapter “Best Technical Paper” award.

His varied technical contributions have included aluminum purification, the manufacture of aluminum-lithium alloys, skim and UBC processing, separation of UBC alloys, the electrowinning of rare earth metals and scandium, and most notably, the development and successful commercialization of Alcoa’s E-Coat® process and products at Warrick Operations.  Dr. Bowman supported the former Alcoa Smelting Process in Anderson County, TX.  Additionally, his technical contributions to Alcoa’s former magnesium manufacturing process in Addy, WA, had a major financial impact on that location.

In recent years Dr. Bowman’s team has led the commissioning and successful startup of three processing lines.

Dr. Bowman and his wife, Jo Ellen, plan to continue to live near Apollo, PA, spending even more time with the families of their four children and ten grandchildren. In addition to his service to Tusculum, he also plans to stay busy with his many favorite year-round outdoor activities including golf and driving his 1999 red Corvette convertible, volunteer projects at Jo Ellen’s Domestic Violence Victims’ Center and Shelter and making maple syrup.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

’60s

Allen Rothe ’63 and Carolyn Dyer Rothe ’66 of Mohawk, TN, celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary on June 26, 2015.

 

’80s

Tony Feathers ’83 has been named one of the 2016 Teachers of the Year for the Greeneville City School System. Feathers has been selected as the system’s representative for the high school level. He serves as the art and photography teacher at Greeneville High School. He has 29 years of teaching experience, nine of which have been at GHS.

 

’90s

Karen Richter May ’91 of McDonald, TN, has been inducted into the Old Timers Hall of Fame by the Cleveland Parks and Recreation Department. The Hall of Fame recognizes individuals who had a positive impact on local sports programs, either as a player or a coach. May was inducted for her contributions to local basketball. She began playing basketball at the local YMCA in Cleveland and was one of the top players for the Cleveland Junior High and Cleveland High School teams. She was recognized in high as an All-State player. She chose to continue her education and pursue her love of basketball at Lee College after high school. At Lee, she was the all-time leading rebounder in school history and was a member of the 1986 national championship team. She was also named an Academic All-American team and later continued her academic excellence at Tusculum, earning a master’s degree in education with a 4.0 grade point average. May taught at the elementary-age level for eight years in Bradley County and home-school hear own children. She also helps her husband operate their family business, 3-D Construction. She is also active in her church, Mount Olive Church of God.

Samantha Burston ’97 of Philadelphia, PA, was named  vice president of operations  for The CMA Group in February. She was previously a sales representative for North American Cable Equipment.

Anthony P. Jones ’97 of Seven Devils, NC, has been named director of student financial aid at Appalachian State University. He will begin his new position on April 1. He will be responsible for the administration of all federal, state and institutional financial aid programs; interpretation, implementation and administration of those programs in accordance with governing rules and regulatory authorities; implementation of scholarship awards within the overall financial aid packages; and the stewardship of the entire financial aid program effort in a manner that supports Appalachian’s strategic plan and enrollment goals. Jones was previously serving as member of the faculty in Appalachian State’s Department of Leadership and Educational Studies. He worked in various capacities with the Advisory Committee on Student Financial Aid Assistance (ACSFA) in Washington, D.C., including serving as director of policy research before being promoted to deputy executive director. Also in Washington, D.C., he was a trainer and regulatory analyst for the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators and a served as a policy analyst/program specialist with the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Postsecondary Education. Jones also has worked in or directed financial aid offices at his Alma Mater, North Carolina  State University, and the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. He is pursuing a doctorate in higher education from the University of Georgia.

Bert Seay ’98 of Mosheim, TN, has been promoted by the Town of Greeneville to the position of chief building official.  Seay has served as Greeneville building inspector for the past three years, providing inspection and other essential services of the Planning, Building and Development Department. Seay is certified with the International Code Council and licensed by the State of Tennessee as a residential and commercial inspector in the areas of building, plumbing and mechanical systems. He was awarded scholarships from the International Code Council to attend Code Development hearings in Portland, Ore., in 2012 and Atlantic City, N.J., in 2013 as a governmental voting representative for this area and the State of Tennessee.

 

 

’00s

Brent Dyson ’04 of Glade Spring, VA, has been appointed as vice president and loan officer for First Bank and Trust Company in Abingdon, VA. Dyson has 11 years of prior banking experience, most recently with Bank of Marion. In his new position he will focus on mortgage and commercial lending, as well as agricultural lending. Dyson is a member of the Washington County Virginia Rotary.

Carla Renner ’05 has been named one of the 2016 Teachers of the Year for the Greeneville City School System. Renner is a fifth-grade teacher at Tusculum View Elementary School, was selected as the system-wide representative for grades fifth through eighth. She has been a member of the Tusculum View faculty for 11 years.

 

’10s

Ben Spillner ’13 of Greeneville, TN, has named director of stadium operations for the Greeneville Astros. Ben came to the Astros as an operations assistant during the 2012 and 2013 seasons and served as a sales account executive for the past two years. He will continue to assist with group sales, corporate sales, social media, and the layout of the game-day program while overseeing the team retail store, online store orders and facility management during the Astros season at Pioneer Park.

 

 

 

 

Jarrell and Brittany (Bible) NeSmith ’09 ’10 welcomed Fowler Grey NeSmith on March 21, 2016, weighing in at 8 lbs. and 6 oz and 20.5 inches long. The new baby already has a strong Tusculum connection as the couple announced they were expecting during the ceremony inducting Jarrell into the Tusculum Sports Hall of Fame.

 

 

 

 

’40s

Claude Galbreath Swafford ’48 of Jasper, TN, passed away March 25, 2016. A trailblazer, Galbreath took over operating her family’s business while starting college at Tusculum during World War II. However, her ambitions soon took her to Knoxville, where she enrolled in the law school at the University of Tennessee over her mother’s objections. She was one of only two women in her law school class. Mrs. Swafford became one of the first 100 female lawyers in Tennessee. Two years after becoming an attorney, she successfully argued her first case before the Tennessee Supreme Court. Although she practiced law, her real passion was improving public education. Mrs. Swafford held a fundamental, core belief that every child, regardless of circumstance, had a right to have an education as good as the education she provided her own children. As a member of the Marion County Board of Education she oversaw construction of several new schools and hand-picked the architects to insure integrity. Of her 20 years as a member of the Marion County School Board, Mrs. Swafford served as chair for 10 of those years and was President of the Tennessee School Board Association for four years. She was an alternate delegate to two Republican National Conventions and honored as the 1999 Tennessee Statesman of the Year. Mrs. Swafford was appointed by President Ronald Reagan to serve on the Board of the National Legal Services Corporation. Following two terms, she was then appointed by Secretary of Defense to serve on the Defense Advisory Committee on Women in the Services. She traveled as a three-star general in this capacity.

Samuel “Sam” P. Roller ’49 of Portland, OR, passed away March 1, 2016, of natural causes. Mr. Roller was a native of Kingsport, TN, and was a veteran, having served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. After the war, he enrolled at Tusculum, where he not only earned a degree in science but also met the love of his life, Nan Jean Thomas ’49. The coupled moved to Oregon in 1949 where they married. Mr. Roller joined the McKesson Co. as a sales representative in Pendleton in 1950 and later moved to Corvallis in 1962. He had a 40-year career with McKesson and received many awards from the company for various sales milestones. Mr. Roller was known as an outgoing, caring individual who developed many friendships with his customers and acquaintances. Some of his best memories were the various travels around the world with customers at McKesson shows. He also enjoyed fishing trips to Alaska. Mr. Roller and his wife were involved with National Garden Clubs. Retiring from McKesson is 1989, he fulfilled his continuing enthusiasm for working with people as a sales representative, selling walking canes around the country, and becoming known as “The Caneman.” Mr. Roller and his wife fully retired in 2006 and moved from Corvallis to the Terwilliger Plaza in Portland where they enjoyed their time meeting new and old friends. He was a member of First Presbyterian Church of Portland. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Samuel P. and Nan Jean Roller Endowment Scholarship Fund at Tusculum College, P.O. Box 5040, Greeneville, TN 37743.

 

’50s

Zelma Zeller Platz Schroker ’51 of Onancock, VA, passed away on March 23, 2016. Mrs. Schroker was an x-ray technician at St. Peters Hospital in New Brunswick, NJ. She was most recently a member of Belle Haven United Methodist Church and a past member of Harlingen Church. Her survivors include brothers and Tusculum alumni Kenneth Zeller ’60 and Ted Zeller ’60 and sister-in-law and Tusculum alumna Sandra Zeller ’61.

 

’60s

The Reverend John Edson ’66 died suddenly at his home in Dillsburg, PA, on March 14, 2016. The Rev. Edson was a retired Episcopal priest and served many parishes around the country.

 

’80s

Fay Duncan Lane ’86 of Knoxville, TN, passed away at her home on March 18, 2016. Mrs. Lane worked at the Y-12 and K-25 facilities and retired after 40 years of service to Martin Marietta. She was a faithful member of Second Baptist Church of Clinton.

 

’90s

Robert Williams ’92 of Nickelsville, VA, passed away on March 26, 2016. Mr. Williams was an electrical engineer technician at Eastman Chemical, retiring in 2003 after 28 and a half years of service. He was a member of First Baptist Church in Gate City, VA. He enjoyed helping his wife’s family with their farm and was an avid NASCAR farm.

 

 

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Fluidity of Jewish texts examined in third session of Theologian-in-Residence series

Fluidity of Jewish texts examined in third session of Theologian-in-Residence series

Posted on 25 February 2016 by eestes@tusculum.edu

Dr. Travis Williams explains the phenomenon of “Rewritten Scripture” during the third session of the Theologian-in-Residence lecture series.

The fluidity of the Jewish texts found in the Dead Sea Scrolls and the phenomenon of “Rewritten Bible” were explored during the third session of the Theologian-in-Residence lecture series on Tuesday at Tusculum College.

Dr. Travis Williams, assistant professor of religion at Tusculum, is presenting lectures on the Dead Sea Scrolls and the Bible as part of the annual lecture series sponsored by Tusculum College and partially funded by Ron Smith.

Dr. Williams began his lecture by posing the question about why some might doubt that the text found in modern English Bibles is what the authors originally wrote. He noted some of the reasons could include the temporal difference between the ancient authors and modern readers, the lack of original manuscripts due to natural deterioration or destruction and the transmission process through numerous handwritten copies.

As a follow-up, Dr. Williams asked whether modern Bibles reflect what the authors originally wrote or if the text has been changed during transmission. The answer to that question is influenced by the definition of what “originally” means, he continued.

Most scholars agree that the Old Testament was in its earliest form an oral tradition that was later collected in written form. He added that it appears that the text as we know it may have circulated in different forms and those variations in accounts were combined in an effort to preserve all the source material the writers had.

“If the Old Testament is made up of a compilation of sources … then it is very difficult to talk about the original,” he said. “Instead of asking ‘do we have the original,’ I am going to ask a different question – does our English translation reflect the earliest compilations?”

The Dead Sea Scrolls have provided instrumental in the effort to answer that question, Dr. Williams said. The Old Testament in most popular modern translations of the Bible is based on texts from the Masoretic Text tradition, which dates from 1000 C.E., although scholars believe the Torah (the books of the law) were written in 550 B.C. The Masoretic texts do have some issues as there are a few errors and some places were words are missing.

The discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls provided scholars with the earliest copies of the Old Testament that have been found and have indicated some interesting things about the transmission of the scriptures. “Around the time of Jesus and before Jesus, the text was very fluid and the Jews seemed to be okay with it,” he said. “The Dead Sea Scrolls have told us that the texts were not standardized. I would argue that there was more than one edition of every book of the Bible.”

An example of the fluidity discovered in the Dead Sea Scrolls is the two editions of the David and Goliath story found within different scrolls of Genesis that were found. One version matches what is found in modern translations, he explained, and the other is considerably shorter and has some differences such as the height of Goliath and how he died (with David beheading the giant with his sword after striking him with the rock).

“What we have found with the Dead Sea Scrolls is that for the ancient Jews, it was the book itself that was sacred, not a particular form of the book or certain readings in that book,” Dr. Williams said. “On a practical level, the ancient Jews were perfectly okay with diversity in the texts.”

The Dead Sea Scrolls have also helped scholars understand the time frame of the standardization of the text by the ancient Jews, he continued.  It appears that at some point around 1 C.E., that the text became standardized in comparison with scrolls dating from the second century that have now been found in other sites such as Masada and Nahal Hever.

In addition to the variation in the Biblical texts, the Dead Sea Scrolls have also provided insights into the phenomenon of “Rewritten Scriptures” among the ancient Jews. In “Rewritten Scriptures,” a text closely reproduces a recognizable and already authoritative base text, but modifies the text by means of addition, omission, paraphrase, rearrangement or other type of change.

“The Dead Sea Scrolls have shown us that many Jews were not hesitant to change text when they passed it on to the next generation,” Dr. Williams said. Some of the reasons for revising the scripture is to improve the base text by removing inconsistencies/contradictions or by omitting questionable or objectionable elements in the story, harmonizing the texts, clarifying issues, to justify contemporary beliefs or practices that are not explicit in the scriptural text or to authorize other existing traditions which were popular but not part of the original base text. For example, what is known as the “Temple Scroll” is a basic rewriting of the Mosaic law, he added.

The changes in the texts are across a spectrum, from variations between issues to including explanatory additions to major changes and additions that are meant to meet a unique purpose, such as what calendar should be followed in the celebration of festivals, Dr. Williams said.

The concluding Theologian session will be held on Tuesday, March 8, when Dr. Williams will discuss the view of continuing revelation that was held by the authors of the scrolls and its impacts for understanding the nature of authoritative scripture. The session will also include an examination of what books held authoritative position at Qumran and the reasons for their prominence.

The lecture session will begin at 10 a.m. in the Chalmers Conference Center in the Niswonger Commons. The session will conclude around 1:30 p.m., and lunch in the college’s cafeteria is included. Although there is no admission fee to attend the lectures, reservations are required. For more information or to make a reservation for the series, please call 423-636-7304 or email eestes@tusculum.edu.

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Morse named to Tusculum College Board of Trustees

Morse named to Tusculum College Board of Trustees

Posted on 23 February 2016 by srichey@tusculum.edu

The Tusculum College Board of Trustees approved Dr. Jane Lovvorn Morse as its newest board member in a meeting on Saturday, Feb. 20.

“We are very excited to welcome Dr. Morse and anticipate her experience and expertise, as well as her affinity for Tusculum will benefit the entire Tusculum community through her service,” said Dr. Kenneth A. Bowman, chair of the Board of Trustees and 1970 graduate of the college.

Dr. Morse graduated cum laude with a Bachelor of Science degree in natural science/biology from Tusculum College in 1977. She also holds a Bachelor of Science in physical therapy from the University of Tennessee Center for the Health Sciences, which she earned in 1979 with honors, and a doctorate degree in physical therapy from A.T. Still University of Health Sciences, awarded in 2006 with a perfect grade point average.

Dr. Jane Morse

She joins the Board of Trustees after serving Tusculum College in multiple positions. She has served as president, vice-president and secretary of the Tusculum College Alumni Executive Board during her membership since 1987, with a small break in service from 1995 to 1997. During those two years, she was a member of the Tusculum College Bicentennial Planning Board.

Dr. Morse is also a committee member for the South College Physical Therapy Assistant Advisory Board, a position she has held since 2006, and served as a member/treasurer for the Scholarship and Loan Committee of the North Carolina Physical Therapy Association from 2011-2013. She served as committee members for four other professional organizations throughout her career, including the Hamilton County Continuing Education Committee from 1983-1985.

She edited a chapter in the book “Pathology for the Physical Therapist Assistantby Catherine Goodman, Kendra S. Fuller, and Robbie O’Shea, which was published in 2010; in addition, she is a member of the American Physical Therapy Association (member since 1978) and the North Carolina Physical Therapy Association (member since 1984).

Currently, Dr. Morse is an adjunct faculty member at South College in Asheville, a position she has held for nearly 10 years. She has been a physical therapist for 36 years, with the last 27 in Asheville. She volunteers at the Manna Food Bank and serves Groce United Methodist Church as a children’s Sunday school teacher in her spare time.

 

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