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Christine Nugent

German Women and the Long Shadow of National Socialism lecture to be presented at Tusculum

Posted on 27 March 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

A lecture on “German Women and the Long Shadow of National Socialism” will be held at Tusculum on Wednesday, April 5.

The lecture, presented by Christine Nugent, will begin at 12:30 p.m. in the Chalmers Conference Center in Niswonger Commons on the Greeneville campus. The event is sponsored by the Thomas J. Garland Library and the Tusculum Honors Program.

Nugent’s multimedia presentation presents insights from several interconnected research projects she recently conducted in Germany. The topic of the first portion of her lecture is her oral history interviews of non-Jewish German women who grew up in Nazi Germany, specifically her examination of their memories of the Hitler Youth and the war.

As part of her research, Nugent also interviewed women of the daughter generation, born in the 1950s and 60s, asking them about recollections their mothers had shared with them and the young women of the third generation. In contrast to her earlier interviews, Nugent concentrated this study on immigrant women from Africa, Eastern Europe, the former Soviet Union, and the Middle East.

Excerpts from those interviews shed light on the young women’s perspectives on Germany’s approach to dealing with its National Socialist past.Christine Nugent

Nugent will also share her own impressions of Germany’s present day welcoming culture, exemplified by the refugees and asylum seekers that have flocked to the country since 2015.  The presentation will conclude with remarks about the anti-refugee, right-wing protest movement PEGIDA that Nugent studied in 2016.

In summary, Nugent’s presentation weaves the various strands of her research together for a multifaceted perspective on what she calls “the long shadow of National Socialism.”

Nugent, who grew up in Hamburg, West Germany, is the director of the Pew Learning Center and Ellison Library at Warren Wilson College.  She holds degrees in library science and history from the University of Tennessee at Knoxville and Western Carolina University.

Her research focuses on memory studies, concentrating on the transmission of memory from mothers to daughters, and on public memorial culture in Germany.  Her research projects were supported by a fellowship from the Appalachian College Association and by Warren Wilson College.

This event is open to the public and free of charge. This lecture is an Arts and Lecture Series credit event for residential students.

 

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Doll Whispers

Tusculum’s Dollie Boyd elected Tennessee Association of Museums president-elect

Posted on 23 March 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

Dollie Boyd, director of Museum Program and Studies of Tusculum, has been elected president-elect of the Tennessee Association of Museums. After a two-year term, she will become president of the statewide organization.

Boyd was elected at this year’s annual conference held in March. She also presented at several sessions at the event.

Boyd’s duties at Tusculum include overseeing the operations of the museums, the Doak House Museum and President Andrew Johnson Museum and Library and the College Archives. She is also responsible for the development and implementation of on-site and outreach curriculum-based school programs offered through the Doak House Museum.

“I am honored to represent East Tennessee in our state organization. TAM does great work supporting and facilitating the work of wonderful museums state-wide. I am looking forward to working with the TAM board in this new role,” said Boyd.

Boyd joined the Tusculum staff in September 2009 as the manager of school programs. In this position, she developed several new curriculum-based offerings for the public and home-school audiences. A native of Franklin County, Tennessee., Boyd taught grades 9-12 from 1994 to 2007, served as a graduate research assistant at the Albert Gore Research Center and was an interpretive ranger at Tims Ford State Park.

Dollie Boyd

She earned her bachelor’s degree in speech and theater with minors in education and history from Middle Tennessee State University and earned her master’s in history/public history in 2013. Boyd has also made several professional presentations at the National Council of Public History, the Southeast Museums Conference, the Tennessee Association of Museums, and Phi Alpha Theta Regional Conference.

She has also conducted research and an oral history project on three lost communities in Franklin County, which were inundated through the creation of a Tennessee Valley Authority lake.

The Tennessee Association of Museums was founded in 1960 and fosters communication and cooperation between museums, cultural societies, and other members of common interests. The goal of the association is to inform the public on the importance of understanding and preserving Tennessee’s cultural, historical, and scientific heritage.

 

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Old Oak Festival returns to Tusculum College April 21-23

Old Oak Festival returns to Tusculum College April 21-23

Posted on 21 March 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

The Old Oak Festival will return to Tusculum College campus Friday, April 21 through Sunday, April 23.

Featuring a wide variety of music and food and fun, the Old Oak Festival will span across three days, featuring something for everyone, be it live music, theater, arts and crafts or fabulous festival food.

Throughout the weekend on stage, the festival will present the sounds of the region, with a wide variety of music from bluegrass to jazz featuring local vocalists and instrumentalists.

There are limited spaces still available for artisan and crafter booths. Deadline for reserving a booth is March 31, or until all spaces are filled.

“This year’s festival is looking to be bigger and better, with great arts and crafts, performances and opportunities to enjoy a variety of fine arts experiences,” said David Price, director of Music and Band programs at Tusculum College.

This year’s special events will include an art show at Allison Gallery, student theater productions, literary readings, a student day on Friday and the return of the Lego construction contest.

While the list of musical performers is not complete, currently several bands have announced plans to perform and include the Brother Boys, My New Favorites, Shiloh, Ashley Bean, Sigean, the Dread Scots, Poplar Hill Reunion, the Tusculum Jazz Band, the Tusculum Marching Band, the Tusculum Concert Band, the Tusculum Handbell Choir and the Bluegrass Outlaws.

There will also be jam sessions during the festival and visitors are encouraged to bring their instrument and join for a weekend of fun with other musicians.

Workshops for high school students will be held on Friday and include sessions on the Math and Science of Tree Identification, Contemporary Poetry, Instrumental Master Class (Band), Vocal Master Class, Introduction to Programming with Python, Drawing, the Brief Essay or Prose Poem, Medieval Siege Warfare, Songwriting, Playwriting, Political Jeopardy, Flash Fiction, SM-Art! Sensational Mathematical Art, as well as Animation.

Workshops are presented by faculty of Tusculum and other experts in the field.

There is no charge for students to participate in the workshop sessions and lunch will be provided.  Students need to register by Wednesday, April 12. To reserve a spot, contact Kelsey Trom, assistant professor of English at ktrom@tusculum.edu or (423) 636-7420 ext. 5420.

Other special events planned for this year’s festival include an art show at Allison Gallery, student theater productions and literary readings.

There is no fee to attend the festival. Art vendor hours will be Friday from noon until 6 p.m., Saturday from 9 a.m. until 6 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Entertainment and food continues into the evening, with the final performers ending at 10 p.m.

Service animals are welcome; however, no pets allowed. Coolers, firearms and alcohol are also prohibited on the Tusculum campus property during the festival. Lawn chairs and blankets are encouraged.

For updates and more information, visit the website at www.oldoakfestival.org or on facebook. For more information on registering as a vendor or performer or volunteering at the festival, contact Price at 423-636-7303.

 

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GLAWPIGT_Showcase_1

Auditions for GLAWPIGT to be held April 10, workshop scheduled for March 20

Posted on 15 March 2017 by eestes@tusculum.edu

Tusculum Arts Outreach will hold open auditions for GLAWPIGT on Monday, April 10, and a preparatory workshop for interested students on Monday, March 20.

The auditions and workshop will both be held in the auditorium of the Annie Hogan Byrd  Fine Arts Building on the Tusculum campus.

Students from the Greeneville and Greene County regional area who will be in the third grade through the eighth grade during the upcoming 2017-18 school year are invited to audition for the program. GLAWPIGT is an acronym for “Great Literature Alive, Well, and Playing In Greeneville, Tennessee” and was founded in 1986 by Marilyn duBrisk to promote reading and to bring great literature to life through the performing arts. duBrisk and Assistant Director Brian Ricker are looking to fill 10 spots in the program.

GLAWPIGT participants from the area meet weekly on Mondays from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. during the academic school year at the Annie Hogan Byrd Auditorium on the Tusculum campus.

Students are trained in basic presentation skills, as well as the development of essential tools needed for performance. These include proper breathing technique, voice placement, stage movement, character development and improvisation to cultivate creativity. Members work on individual and group performance pieces which the students themselves choose, or that they have been assigned and perform during various events and workshops throughout the year.

A workshop for students interested in Tusculum Arts Outreach’s GLAWPIGT program will be held Monday, March 20, and auditions for the program will be held April 10, both in the Annie Hogan Byrd Auditorium on the Tusculum campus.

 

Registration for the auditions will begin at 5 p.m. on April 10, with the auditions beginning at 5:30 p.m. Those wishing to audition are asked to prepare a memorized reading, poem, or monologue to perform, no longer than two minutes in length. Students auditioning are asked to bring a copy of the reading, poem and monologue and are encouraged to dress comfortably with no flip-flops.

In order to prepare for auditions and provide more information about the program, Arts Outreach will be hosting a GLAWPIGT Workshop on Monday, March 20. at 5:30 p.m. in the Annie Hogan Byrd Auditorium.

The workshop will be open to any students who will be third to eighth grade next school year who wish to learn more about the GLAWPIGT program or any student simply interested in learning about better presentation skills. Attendance to the workshop will not be taken as a commitment to attend the April 10 auditions, and attending the workshop is not required to audition, but is strongly encouraged.

For more information please contact Arts Outreach at 423-798-1620 or by e-mailing baricker@tusculum.edu.

 

Members of GLAWPIGT displayed their talent and skills in performances during the 2016 Old Oak Festival.

 

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Tusculum students to present at regional honors conference

Tusculum students to present at regional honors conference

Posted on 15 March 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

Four Tusculum students have been selected to present at the 2017 Southern Regional Honors Council Conference to be held in Asheville, North Carolina, March 30-April 1.

“We are proud of and very excited for our stellar honors students who have been accepted to present at such as prestigious honors conference in Asheville,” said Dr. Troy Goodale, associate professor of political science and faculty liaison to the Tusculum Honors Program.  “These are exciting times for the Tusculum Honors Program, and moving forward we anticipate taking advantage of more opportunities to highlight and showcase the undergraduate research that many of our best students are producing.”

Students Macy French, a senior English major from Kingsport; Hannah Arnett, a senior museum studies major from Butler; Shannele Sunderland, a senior sports science major from Austin, Texas; and Darian Tipton, a senior mathematics major from Shelbyville, will each represent Tusculum by presenting original research at the conference.

French will present, “Ethics of Persona,” which deals with the controversial question of pseudonyms writers may use when submitting literary work for publication.

“I’m thrilled to represent Tusculum, as well as the Honors Program, at this event. It will be a great opportunity to network with other honors students from around the region and gain valuable experience giving a presentation on this level,” said French.

Arnett’s presentation is about ethical implications in public history, and how public historians—museum professionals, specifically—can create open, inclusive dialogue about the past.

“People think about history differently, and they have their own unique, preconceived notions about the past that aren’t always accurate, or even true,” said Arnett. “I hope to offer some suggestions as to why these differences exist, and how professionals can better act as mediators between diverse public understanding and academic reality.”

Sunderland’s project focuses on the risk factors of anterior cruciate ligament tears and risk factors including, gender, sport played, location and field conditions.

“The Honors Program has given me the opportunity to complete research projects beyond what we are offered in our other classes,” said Sunderland. “I will have the opportunity to present in front of a large audience, and I am excited for this as it will push me outside of my comfort zone.”

Tipton will present on tutoring techniques of peer tutors that are currently being utilized in order to establish a standard for best practices.

Excited about the opportunity to present, Tipton said, “The Honors Program has provided me with both a sense of community and a sense of direction, which I believe directly contributed to me remaining in college even when that seemed improbable.”

Meagan Stark, director of the Honors Program, said everyone involved is incredibly proud of the quality of scholarly work our honors students are capable of producing.

“Their invitation to present research at SRHC indicates that our honors students are academically competitive inside and outside the institution,” she said.

The theme of this year’s conference is “Diving into Diversity: Opportunities and Obligations in Honors Education.”

According to Stark, Tusculum’s focus on civic engagement places the school’s honors students in an exceptional position to speak to the obligations honors students have as informed citizens and engaged leaders.  “All of their projects demonstrate a desire to expand our understanding of the world for the betterment of all.”

The host institution for the 2017 conference is the University of North Carolina – Asheville.

Back from left are Dr. Troy Goodale, faculty liaison and Meagan Stark, director of the Tusculum Honors Program. From left, seated, are Shannele Sunderland, Macy French, Darian Tipton and Hannah Arnett. The students have been selected to present at an upcoming regional honors conference.

 

 

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FishingClubgift1web

Tusculum Fishing Club secures gift with win

Posted on 14 March 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

 

Nick Hatfield and Corey Neece accept a check along with Tusculum President Nancy B. Moody for $2,000 from Fishing League Worldwide. The money will be put into the Tusculum Fishing Club program. The financial gift came as a result of the team being one of the top 10 qualifiers at the February 25 YETI FLW College Fishing Southeastern Conference bass tournament on lake Guntersville.

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oldoakvendorweb

Old Oak Festival accepting vendor registrations through March 31

Posted on 13 March 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

The deadline for vendors to register to participate in the Tusculum Old Oak Festival is Friday, March 31.

There are limited spaces still available for artisan and crafter booths, and the deadline for reserving a booth is March 31, or until all spaces are filled. The Old Oak Festival returns to Tusculum campus April 21-23.

Featuring a wide variety of music and food and fun, the Old Oak Festival will span across three days, featuring something for everyone, be it live music, theater, arts and crafts or fabulous festival food.

Throughout the weekend on stage, the festival will present the sounds of the region, with a wide variety of music from bluegrass to jazz featuring local vocalists and instrumentalists.

“We are very excited about the wide variety of art and craft vendors that we have committed to this year’s festival,” said David Price, director of music and band programs at Tusculum and coordinator of the festival.

“This year’s vendors offer something for everyone and show off amazing artistic talent from folks in our region and beyond.”

While the list of musical performers is not complete, currently several bands have announced plans to perform and include the Brother Boys, My New Favorites, Shiloh, Ashley Bean, Sigean, the Dread Scots, Poplar Hill Reunion, the Tusculum Jazz Band, the Tusculum Marching Band, the Tusculum Concert Band, the Tusculum Handbell Choir and the Bluegrass Outlaws.

There will also be jam sessions during the festival and visitors are encouraged to bring their instrument and join for a weekend of fun with other musicians.

Workshops for high school students will be held on Friday and include sessions on the Math and Science of Tree Identification, Contemporary Poetry, Instrumental Master Class (Band), Vocal Master Class, Introduction to Programming with Python, Drawing, the Brief Essay or Prose Poem, Medieval Siege Warfare, Songwriting, Playwriting, Political Jeopardy, Flash Fiction, SM-Art! Sensational Mathematical Art, as well as Animation.

Workshops are presented by faculty of Tusculum and other experts in the field.

There is no charge for students to participate in the workshop sessions and lunch will be provided.  Students need to register by Wednesday, April 12. To reserve a spot, contact Kelsey Trom, assistant professor of English at ktrom@tusculum.edu or (423) 636-7420 ext. 5420.

Other special events planned for this year’s festival include an art show at Allison Gallery, student theater productions and literary readings.

There is no fee to attend the festival. Art vendor hours will be Friday from noon until 6 p.m., Saturday from 9 a.m. until 6 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Entertainment and food continues into the evening, with the final performers ending at 10 p.m.

Service animals are welcome; however, no pets allowed. Coolers, firearms and alcohol are also prohibited on the Tusculum campus property during the festival. Lawn chairs and blankets are encouraged.

For updates and more information, visit the website at www.oldoakfestival.org or on facebook. For more information on registering as a vendor or performer or volunteering at the festival, contact Price at 423-636-7303.

 

The Old Oak Festival returns to Tusculum campus April 21-23.

 

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Tusculum hosts local high school students for College Summit

Posted on 10 March 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

Students from the four county high schools were given information to help them prepare for the college application process during the annual College Summit at Tusculum on Friday, March 10.

Eleventh graders from North Greene, South Greene, West Greene and Chuckey-Doak high schools attended the event at Tusculum, hosted by Advise TN. Students also attended a College Fair at Walters State Community College in Greeneville as part of their day.

Advise TN is a college advising and capacity building program developed by the Tennessee Higher Education Commission and the Office of Governor Bill Haslam. Advise TN aims to increase the number of Tennesseans accessing higher education by partnering with high schools and providing college advising services to up to 10,000 junior and senior students across Tennessee.

“The ultimate goal of the program is to develop a college-going culture in the Greene County School System,” said Ruth Ann Tipton, a college advisor for Advise TN. “We want every high school student to know they can go to college and that through Tennessee Promise, the financial resources are available to them to make it happen.”

Welcoming the high school students to campus, Tusculum President Nancy B. Moody encouraged the juniors to pursue education following graduation whether it is at a technical school, a community college, a state university or a private college.

Following the opening session, the students met with enrollment representatives who discussed college admission test preparation, college interviews, financial aid and admission processes and college life.

The students were then treated to a tour of the Tusculum campus.

 

The College Summit at Tusculum on Friday gave local high school students an opportunity to hear first-hand about the college application process from Tusculum President Nancy B. Moody.

 

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Early Christian oral transmission of gospel stories focus of concluding session of Theologian lecture series

Early Christian oral transmission of gospel stories focus of concluding session of Theologian lecture series

Posted on 02 March 2017 by eestes@tusculum.edu

Dr. Travis Williams

The oral transmission of stories about Jesus by early Christians was explored in the final session of the Theologian-in-Residence lecture series at Tusculum College on Tuesday.

Each Tuesday during February, Dr. Travis Williams, associate professor of religion at Tusculum College, has led an exploration of “Jesus in Early Christian Memory: Remember, Reconstructing and Rehearsing the Past.” The college sponsors the lecture series with support from Ron Smith.

As he began his lecture, Dr. Williams noted that the amount of change that may have taken place in the oral transmission of the words and deeds of Jesus among the early Christians prior to the written gospel accounts is a core point of contention between the apologists and critics of the Biblical text.

Critics point to the distortion that occurs as information is passed along human channels. The critics perception of the transmission process can be described as a chain, he continued, and they say that because each link in the Jesus tradition is connected to and dependent on the preceding links, any link that becomes distorted then the remainder are irreparably affected.

However, Dr. Williams said, a problem with this position is that oral tradition encompasses more than just an individual-to-individual sharing of information.

Scholar Rafael Rodriguez has been a leading proponent of a different understanding of oral tradition, proposing that oral tradition involves multiple lines of transmission, he continued.

Dr. Williams noted that the letters of the apostle Paul include evidence of the circulation of the oral Jesus tradition within early Christian communities. Paul makes reference to speaking to the apostles who were eyewitnesses to Jesus’ life in his letters, he explained, as well as his own passing of “what he had received” to the early churches as well as mentioning other traveling Christians who visited the churches.

Instead of a chain as the critics envision the oral transmission, it can be pictured as more like a net with multiple lines of transmission through a number of individuals that provide for self-correction, Dr. Williams said.

Another problem with the view of an individual-to-individual transmission of the stories, Dr. Williams said, is that it does not take into account the multiple ways that the stories of Jesus were shared.           The actions and teachings of Jesus became part of the oral tradition that was frequently recited within the community through storytelling and performance.

In contrast to the critics, the apologists of the gospels say that the stories were not changed significantly through oral transmission, Dr. Williams said. The apologists point to the importance the oral tradition played in the social identity of the early Christians and because of that they would have taken special care to preserve the accuracy of the Jesus stories.

One Jesus scholar, Birger Gerhardsson, theorized that the oral transmission of the Jesus tradition was similar to the way sacred tradition was preserved among Jewish rabbinic disciples in that Jesus would have had his followers to memorize his teachings.

However, a major issue with this memorization theory is the large number of variations in the parallel portions of the gospels, which point against the exact memorization of Jesus’ teachings by his disciples, Dr. Williams continued.

In looking at how the Jesus stories were transmitted, Dr. Williams said, the gospels cannot be approached as just written texts detached from the oral tradition from which they were dependent and out of which context they were derived.

“If we think about the roots of the gospel, the oral tradition is all the different ways the stories, the life and reputation of Jesus were transmitted, all the ways the stories of Jesus were committed and preserved in the collective memory of his later followers,” Dr. Williams said.

In addition to the verbal telling of the stories and performances, he continued, the early Christians preserved the life and influence of Jesus through rituals such as the Lord’s Supper, ceremonies such as baptism, bodily practices such as fasting and prayer and calendar observance (Sunday as the Lord’s Day).

The written gospels draw from and repeat words, concepts and stories that were part of the oral tradition, which still presenting them in unique ways for their specific audiences, Dr. Williams said.

“The books of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John present different pictures of Jesus,” he said. “They are one-time actualizations of the story of Jesus. If the authors had a different audience, they might tell it again differently.”

“When the gospel authors wrote down the accounts, they used the language, concepts and stories that form part of the larger tradition context,” he also said. “Modern Christians have no access to the vast majority of this ancient Jesus tradition, which circulated within the early church.”

The differences found and even the existence of multiple gospels show that there was great variation in how the story of Jesus could be told, Dr. Williams said. The earliest Christians treated the story of Jesus as happening in the past, but malleable and inspiring enough to address and be shaped by the changing circumstances, which the early church experienced, he added.

While the written gospels were originally understood as expressions of the larger  Jesus tradition, that tradition faded over time and these four expressions came to viewed as the totality of the tradition, he said.

However, the change to the written form was needed to help preserve the tradition, Dr. Williams said, noting the work of German scholars Jan and Adelia Assman who developed a theory that a collective memory of the past cannot survive across generational divides without a change in the media in which it is preserved and transmitted, he said.

In summary, Dr. Williams said that the memory and transmission of the Jesus tradition had five important ingredients. First, he said, memories of the words and deeds of Jesus were formed throughout his ministry by those who were eyewitnesses, which include some distortion caused by the memory process and social environment influences.

Secondly, the life of Jesus was memorialized in by his followers in a variety of ways (oral performances, rituals, ceremonies, etc.), he continued, and then was transmitted by Christian missionaries around the ancient world, a process which helped offset some of the deficiencies of memory while still allowing for change and adaptation.

Fourthly, the Jesus story was adapted to fit new and evolving circumstances of early Christian communities as time passed and situations changed, he said. And lastly, different expressions of the larger Jesus tradition were written down in an attempt to transform the communicative memory into a more durable form.

“The memories of Jesus were formed by eyewitnesses but influenced by communities,” he said. “They were grounded in the past but reconstructed in the present, stable through the repetition but malleable from social change and representative of tradition but reflecting singular performance.”

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Tusculum College closing March 1 due to severe weather threat

Posted on 01 March 2017 by admin

Due to the threat of severe weather, Tusculum College, all campuses and sites, will close at 11:30 a.m. on March 1. All afternoon and evening classes are cancelled, and offices will close, although essential staff will remain on campus and continue to function in their necessary capacity.

The official fall-out shelter location of the College is the lower level of the Pioneer Arena in the Niswonger Commons. At the recommendation of the National Weather Service in the event of a tornado warning shelter in place, selecting a small, interior room, with no or few windows and remain there until the warning has been lifted. Do not travel across campus to the Arena shelter if a warning is in effect.
https://weather.com/safety/tornado/news/tornadoes-safety-during-20120330.

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Tusculum President Dr. Nancy Moody announces retirement

Tusculum President Dr. Nancy Moody announces retirement

Posted on 28 February 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

Dr. Nancy B. Moody, the first female to serve as president of Tusculum College, will retire at the end of 2017.

Dr. Moody submitted her letter of intent to the Tusculum Board of Trustees during their February meeting. She will continue to serve until December 31. She has served as president of Tusculum College since 2009.

Dr. Kenneth A. Bowman, chair of the board and 1970 alumnus of the college, said that a presidential search committee is being formed and will be chaired by Dr. Greg Nelson, a Tusculum College trustee. The Board will also be interviewing search firms for possible use in the search for a new president.

In her letter, Dr. Moody stated, “I am honored to have had the opportunity to serve as the 27th president, and first female president, of this historic institution. In the last 7.5 years, the most memorable events for me have been the relationships that I have had the good fortune of developing with students, the Board of Trustees, alumni, members of the local community, faculty and staff, and particularly with donors, most notably Verna June Meen.

“Verna June came to love Tusculum and her interactions at events with members of the Board and others.  She expressed on more than one occasion, how proud she was to have provided support to Tusculum College for the Meen Center for Science and Math and for two endowments, one to fund scholarships and one to fund an endowed professorship in Chemistry.”

Dr. Bowman said, “It was eight years ago that Dr. Moody began the interview process for the presidency at Tusculum College.  During her tenure, she has led the college into a new era of growth and expansion, in terms of bricks and mortar, academic programs and fiscal responsibility.”

He added that one of the highlights of her term has been the construction of the Meen Center, the larger of the two academic building constructed in approximately 50 years on the Tusculum campus. The Thomas G. Garland Library renovation was the first in 2008. Dr. Moody shepherded the state-of-the-art 100,000-square foot Meen Center project every step of the way, from the initial approval to the funding and finally to overseeing the construction of this state-of-the-art facility which was occupied by students and faculty last month.

Dr. Nancy B. Moody

He added, since assuming the college presidency as the first female in Tusculum’s history to hold the position, Dr. Moody has faced several challenges.

“During her first full year at Tusculum College, we had a very successful review by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges. Since that time, we have added new academic programs including criminal justice, bachelor’s and master’s degrees in nursing, an MBA program, the first associate degree program with more academic programs slated to begin this fall including a bachelor’s degree in healthcare management, a bachelor’s degree in talent development and a Master of Accountancy degree, all of which have been or will be reviewed and approved by SACSCOC.  We have also added new athletic programs in men’s and women’s lacrosse, track and field and STUNT, which will begin this fall.”

He continued, “Dr. Moody has embraced the opportunity to encourage faculty, staff, students and volunteers to push Tusculum College forward through creative teaching and learning into the world of online programming for dual enrollment, distance education and fully online programs.”

She has secured a total of $49.8 million in Community Facilities direct loans from the U.S. Department of Agriculture for the construction of the new science and math facility, as well as for the construction of two new apartment-style residence halls. The lower 40-year, fixed-rate interest rates on these loans significantly lowered what the college pays in debt service, making the new construction and renovation possible while also improving the college’s overall finances.

Dr. Moody also led the efforts that secured a $3.875 million gift for the naming of the Meen Center and two $1.5 million endowments to support faculty and students. She has successfully sought new gifts, donors and partnership in order to ensure the success of the new and existing programs. Working with donors, foundations and government agencies, she has encouraged the investment of millions of dollars into Tusculum College’s growth.

Dr. Bowman added that during her tenure, cash increased from $1.3 million to $3.7 million, long-term investments increased from $12.5 million to $27.7 million, capital assets increased from $58.9 million to $71.8 million and the college’s endowment increased from $14 million to $18.6 million.

The college’s Board of Trustees recognized Dr. Moody’s contributions to Tusculum by presenting her with the inaugural Founder’s Award in February 2013. The Founders’ Award, named in memory of Rev. Samuel Doak, Rev. Samuel Witherspoon Doak and Rev. Hezekiah Balch, is presented by the Tusculum College Board of Trustees to recognize those who with integrity, tenacity, commitment, ingenuity and drive have moved Tusculum College forward in serving its students, its community and the world at large.

Among other significant accomplishments, Dr. Moody was instrumental in obtaining a $264,000 grant from the BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee Health Foundation for a simulation laboratory for use in the nursing and related programs by students and staff and area community partners. The simulation lab is used to produce highly-qualified BSN graduates skilled at clinical decision-making, who will provide safe, competent and improved health care for future generations of Tennesseans.

Partnerships with other institutions are at an all-time high. Tusculum College has arranged articulation and affiliation agreements with regional community colleges and professional schools to both increase enrollment in the bachelor’s degree programs and afford expedited graduate school opportunities for alumni of Tusculum College.

“She has engaged with alumni and friends of the College, encouraging their continued interest and support in the institution. She has reminded all of the Tusculum community what it means to be a Tusculum Pioneer,” said Dr. Bowman.

Prior to joining Tusculum College, Dr. Moody was president of Lincoln Memorial University for seven years.  Under her leadership, LMU’s enrollment increased by 90 percent.  The university also initiated the Lincoln Memorial University-DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine and expanded the Caylor School of Nursing to include a master of science in nursing degree program with family nurse practitioner and nurse anesthesia concentrations.  Other programs initiated under her leadership included a master’s degree program preparing physician’s assistants and a doctorate of education degree.

A registered nurse, Dr. Moody began her academic career as a nursing instructor for Lincoln Memorial University in 1974 and advanced to hold several academic leadership positions there – including dean of the School of Nursing and Allied Health.  associate professor and department chair in the College of Nursing at East Tennessee State University, as the executive director of the Tennessee Center for Nursing, as assistant professor of nursing in the College of Nursing at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

Prior to joining Tusculum College, Dr. Moody was president of Lincoln Memorial University for seven years.  Under her leadership, LMU’s enrollment increased by 90 percent.  The university also initiated the Lincoln Memorial University-DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine and expanded the Caylor School of Nursing to include a master of science in nursing degree program with family nurse practitioner and nurse anesthesia concentrations.  Other programs initiated under her leadership included a master’s degree program preparing physician’s assistants and a doctorate of education degree.

She is the newly-elected chair of the Board of Trustees of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges, and has served as chair of the NCAA DII South Atlantic Conference, and an advisory board member for the Northeast Tennessee College and Career Readiness Consortium funded through an Investing in Innovation (i3) grant funded by the U. S. Department of Education and awarded to the Niswonger Foundation.

Dr. Moody received her associate’s and bachelor’s degrees in nursing from Eastern Kentucky University and earned a master of science in nursing from the Texas Women’s University Institute of Health Sciences-Houston Center in 1978.  She also received a doctorate in nursing from the University of Alabama at Birmingham’s School of Nursing.

During her career, Dr. Moody has been recognized by all three of her alma maters, Eastern Kentucky University, Texas Woman’s University and the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing, where she received the Chancellor’s Alumni Excellence Award.

She is married to Tom Moody, a self-employed public accountant. She and Tom are proud parents of two adult children, daughter, Mykel, and son, Adam.

 

 

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Pioneer Fishing Club takes top spot in Southeastern tournament

Pioneer Fishing Club takes top spot in Southeastern tournament

Posted on 27 February 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

The Tusculum College Fishing Club took first place in this weekend’s YETI FLW College Fishing Southeastern Conference event at Lake Guntersville.

Tusculum took the top spot with a slim 3-ounce margin over runner-up, the University of Georgia and in the process topped the largest field ever assembled for a college bass fishing tournament at 248 teams.

According to tournament officials, the new participation record eclipses the previous mark of 214 teams set last season at the Bassmaster College Series Southern Regional at Lake Martin. The previous FLW record was set and later matched in 2016 at the FLW College Fishing Open on Kentucky Lake in April and the Southeastern Conference qualifier at Lake Chickamauga in September.

For its win at Guntersville, the Tusculum team of Nick Hatfield, a senior business administration major from Greeneville, and Cory Neece, a junior environmental science major from Bristol, earned a spot in the 2018 FLW College Fishing National Championship. The top 24 teams qualified for the championship from this event: the top 10 plus one additional team for every 10 teams over 100 that participated.

According to Neece, the keys to the team’s success were staying shallow around grass and accommodating for windy, post-frontal conditions.

“We found a lot of fish in practice, but the wind and the mud washed a lot of areas out because it was so bad out there today,” he says. “We had a couple of areas that were protected, and that’s where we caught our fish.”

He added. “You had to fish them real slow and had to pick the area apart to get them to bite, and really we were making multiple casts in the same spot. You know the fish are there. It’s just getting them to bite.”

As a result team being among the top 10 qualifiers in the tournament, the Fishing Club program received a donation of $2,000 from Fishing League Worldwide. The money will be put into the Tusculum Fishing Club program.

The Pioneer Fishing Club is sponsored by Dr. Jason Jones, assistant professor of physical education. Anyone interested in the club should email nickhatfield.nh@gmail.com.

 

Nick Hatfield and Corey Neece of Tusculum College

 

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