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Spring Commencement will be Saturday, May 7

Spring Commencement will be Saturday, May 7

Posted on 13 April 2016 by eestes@tusculum.edu

May 7 will mark a milestone for about 350 Tusculum College students who will reach the successful completion of their educational journey by earning degrees during the Spring Commencement Ceremony that day.

Two ceremonies are planned and both will take place in the Pioneer Arena of the Niswonger Commons. The first will be at 10 a.m. and will include students earning degrees from the Traditional College program. The second will be at 2 p.m. and include students earning Master’s degrees and the students earning degrees from the Graduate and Professional Studies bachelor’s programs.

Tusculum College applauds the graduates for their hard-earned achievements and is preparing for May 7 as a day of celebration for the newest alumni and their families. The College is busy making preparations to make the day a memorable one and you can help.

Family members are asked to carpool if possible rather than bring multiple cars to the ceremony to help lessen congestion on campus. As you arrive on campus, security personnel will direct you to a parking area and shuttles will provided from outer lots to the Niswonger Commons.

If you are any of your family members or guests requires special handicapped seating accommodations, please contact Bobbie Greenway at 423-636-7300 ext. 5154 so your needs can be addressed. There will be handicapped parking available in the large parking lot at the Niswonger Commons. Please let the security personnel directing traffic and parking know that you need handicapped parking if it is needed and they will direct you to the lot. Please note that Tusculum will not be able to provide wheelchairs. Those with special seating accommodations are asked to arrive at least 45 minutes prior to the beginning of the ceremony.

You can also help by helping your graduate be at the Pioneer Arena in time for graduation practice. For the morning ceremony, practice begins at 8:45 a.m. and it begins 12:45 p.m. for the 2 p.m. ceremony. Graduates who arrive prior to the practice times are asked to report to the cafeteria.

Graduates are not allowed to have personnel items such as purses and cameras with them during the ceremony. You can assist them by obtaining these items from them prior to graduation practice and holding them.  Prior to the practice is a good time for this and other communication between you and your graduate because after graduation practice, the graduates go to the cafeteria where they placed in order for the procession and for the ceremony. It is easier for the College staff getting the graduates in line if they stay inside the cafeteria during this period.

The Pioneer Arena will open for guest seating after completion of the rehearsal. Guests are asked to arrive at least 30 minutes prior to the beginning of the ceremony.

No tickets are required for graduation and there is no limit on the number of guests per graduate. However, to help provide seating for all, guests are asked to not hold seats for others in the last 45 minutes prior to the beginning of the ceremony.

Programs will be placed on the seat of each graduate and they will be distributed to guests at the Pioneer Arena primary entrances. The program will also posted on the Tusculum web site following the ceremony. For graduates unable to attend the ceremony, diplomas will be mailed to the graduates’ home addresses after Commencement Day provided all academic and financial obligations are satisfied.

To help preserve the prestigious decorum of the commencement ceremony, guests are asked to observe the following:

  • As a courtesy to other attendees, please consider making alternative arrangements for very young children.  Due to fire marshal regulations, no baby carriers or strollers will be allowed in the auditorium.
  • Cell phones are to be turned off or switched to the silent operating mode during the ceremony.  Do not speak on a cell phone or carry on a conversation during the ceremony as this prevents others from hearing and enjoying the ceremony.
  • Commencement is both a joyous and solemn event.  Please express your excitement in ways that will not prevent others from hearing the speaker and enjoying the ceremony.  Use of air horns, yelling or stomping are disruptive.
  • Please refrain from taking pictures until after your graduate receives his or her diploma.  This will allow the ceremony to flow smoothly and reduce the distractions and disturbances to other audience members as they try to see and hear ongoing presentations.
  • As a courtesy to and out of respect for your fellow graduates, you and your family are requested to remain in the auditorium until the conclusion of the ceremony. At the conclusion of the ceremony, the faculty traditionally forms a gauntlet and applauds the graduates as they recess from the auditorium.  We ask that your family and friends be respectful of this tradition and remain in the auditorium until the graduates have exited the auditorium.

 

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Tusculum places in top 10 in “Up to Us” national competition

Tusculum places in top 10 in “Up to Us” national competition

Posted on 12 April 2016 by srichey@tusculum.edu

A team of students from Tusculum College was awarded fifth place in the fourth annual Up to Us campus competition.

Up to Us is a project coordinated by Net Impact, working in partnership with the Peter. G. Petersen Foundation and the Clinton Global Initiative. The organization provides an opportunity to college students to educate their peers on issues stemming from the national debt, giving students the chance to speak up and make an impact on the nation’s long-term fiscal and economic health.

During the 2016 Up to Us campaign, 230 students on 53 teams in 28 states worked on their individual campuses to engage other students in understanding the national debt through in-person outreach, events and activities on campus.

“It’s been a rewarding experience,” said Michael Fernando, a senior Tusculum College student from Sri Lanka majoring in accounting, general management and economics and international business, who headed the effort at Tusculum College. “After we were invited to participate in Up to Us, such a prestigious competition, I knew we would have to give it all we had. We had a great team, and I am glad that we were as successful as we were.”

According to Fernando, Tusculum College participated in the campaign from October 22, 2015 through February 21, 2016, launching weeks of creative, non-partisan and thought-provoking campus campaigns to raise awareness of the impact of America’s long-term national debt.

The Tusculum College team led some innovative campaign strategies, including a TED Talk style forum regarding the national debt, he said. Students participated in the project “Money Doesn’t Grow on Trees,” during which they made signs detailing how they cared about the national debt and hung them around trees on the Greeneville campus and even made special announcements during a basketball game.

As part of their award, the team will also be awarded a cash prize, which they have chosen to donate to Tusculum College. The team leaders from the top 10 teams have also been invited to Washington, D.C. to attend the Peter G. Peterson Foundation’s 2016 Fiscal Summit; they will meet with economists and national political leaders to discuss the national debt and its impact on millennials. Fernando also traveled to the University of California, Berkeley to the Clinton Global Initiative University conference in early April where the winning teams were recognized by former President Bill Clinton.

Teams from the 2016 Up to Us campaign were assessed by a panel of judges that included several elite business executives and Chelsea Clinton, vice chair of the Clinton Foundation.

For more information on the Up to Us initiative, visit www.itsuptous.org.

 

By Madilyn Elliott, senior journalism and professional writing major from Hampton

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Old Oak Festival returns this weekend, April 15-17

Old Oak Festival returns this weekend, April 15-17

Posted on 11 April 2016 by srichey@tusculum.edu

The Carson Peters Band will be returning to the Old Oak Festival.

The Old Oak Festival will return this weekend to the Tusculum College campus April 15-17, featuring crafts, music, art shows, theater, children’s activities, festival food and much, much more.

The Old Oak festival will span across three days and will feature something for everyone, including crafts, music, art, theater, puppetry, and area authors, as well as gallery and museum exhibits.

Craft vendors will include pottery, painting, jewelry, stoneware, weaving, woodworking, gourd art, pine needle baskets and much more.

Throughout the weekend on stage, the festival will present the sounds of the region, with a wide variety of music from bluegrass to jazz to regionally-known vocalists and musicians.

Fiddlin’ Carson Peters returns again to headline the Old Oak Festival, along with the Smoky Mountain Bluegrass band and a host of regional talent. Musicians kicking off the show on Friday include Bean Tree Remedy featuring Ashley Bean, Dave Nunez and the Perfect World Band, Mike Joy, My New Favorites and Prism – a tribute to Pink Floyd. Friday night will also feature Jack & Michael on the Terrace entertaining for a faculty and alumni social event.

On Saturday, expect good old-fashioned fun from Shiloh and the Tusculum College Band closing out the night, but also plan to get to the festival early to hear Stem Winder, the Thursday Night Boys, Jakie Keasling & Friends, New Chronic Dream, the Kevin Wilder Group, The Dandy Lions, Absinthe Gray, Jimmie D and the House Rockers and the Madisons. The night will conclude with a drum circle. There will be a parade at the center of the Tusculum campus, beginning at 10:45 a.m.

The Carson Peters Band will be on the main stage on Saturday as well. Additionally on Saturday, some favorite features return, including the “Conduct Us” session with the Tusculum College Band, where anyone can step up and take over the conductor’s baton.

Winners of this year’s annual Curtis-Owens Literary Awards will be the main event at the Tusculum Review Launch Party set for the Thomas J. Garland Library Terrace, 4-6 p.m. This year’s event will feature 2016 winners Jennie Frost (fiction), Sarah Holly (nonfiction), and Emily Waryck. These readers will be paired with winners from years’ past, David Roncskevitz, Andrew Baker and Joseph Wade Borden. Additionally, copies of the 2016 The Tusculum Review will be available.

Following the 10 a.m. Old Oak Festival Church Service in the main tent, Sunday’s artists will include Jim and Curtis Moneyhun, Steve Brown, the Tusculum College Handbell Choir, the Matthew Hurd Band, Able Brown and the regional favorite, the Great Smoky Mountain Bluegrass band.

“Each year the festival grows and this year is no exception,” said David Price, festival coordinator and director of music for Tusculum College. “There are many high quality craft vendors, more authors and surprises planned for throughout the weekend.”

One surprise that Price said will be unique to the festival is the launching of a trebuchet, built by Tusculum faculty and students. There will also be a catapult craft activity for children of all ages.

According to Dr. Peter Noll, assistant professor of history, “Over the past year, students and faculty have been meeting informally via a teaching and learning circle to read about and discuss a book about medieval technology and social change. The trebuchet we built represents the “enhancement” activity for group.”

According to Dr. Noll, the trebuchet is a gravity powered machine that changed the way siege warfare occurred beginning in the 13th century until it was supplanted by cannon. “We have built a scaled down version that is capable of launching a grapefruit 90 yards, oranges about 75. We plan on demonstrating it throughout the day on Saturday.”

The two museums on the Tusculum camps, the Doak House Museum and the President Andrew Johnson Library and Museum will both be offering free tours on Friday and Saturday from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. Fiddlin’ Carson Peters Band will have an encore concert at the Doak House on Saturday afternoon as well.

A reception at will be held at the President Andrew Johnson Library and Museum on Saturday, beginning at 9 a.m. for new exhibit “Prologue: Andrew Johnson’s Political Career before the Vice Presidency.”

Throughout the festival, the Tusculum College Gaming Club will be hosting a video gaming event in the Pioneer Perk in Niswonger Commons on the Greeneville campus. The event will run Friday from 4 p.m. to midnight; Saturday from noon until 1 a.m., and Sunday from noon to 4 p.m. The event will feature multiple televisions and game sets with various games such as Guitar Hero, SingStar, Super Smash Bros., Call of Duty, FIFA and League of Legends. Attendees may come play the games from our library or bring their own.

During the weekend the LEGO contest entries will be on display at the Doak House, and the winners will be announced at 2 p.m. on Sunday. For more information and rules on the LEGO competition, contact Dollie Boyd, director of museums at dboyd@tusculum.edu.

Additional new features include horse and carriage rides, sponsored by Tymley Travel, and a lineup of 10 workshops designed for high school students, through which five participants will be awarded a $500 scholarship.

The high school workshops will be offered in morning and afternoon shifts, from 9-11 a.m. and 12:30-2:30 p.m. Workshop topics include an educational wetland tour and nature writing, contemporary poetry, drawing, playwriting, and music theory and songwriting. Acting, brief essay or prose poem, tree identification, photo manipulation and songwriting will be offered as well.

As part of the entertainment, Old Oak attendees will have the opportunity to see GLAWPIGT (Great Literature Alive & Well, Playing In Greeneville, Tennessee) as they present a one-hour showcase during each day of the Festival. Show times are Friday, April 15, at 7 p.m., Saturday, April 16, at 2 p.m. and Sunday, April 17, at 2 p.m.

A truly varied hour of entertainment, the showcase includes sketch comedy, young adult fiction, poetry, amusing literary analysis, unique interpretations of fairy tales, Shakespeare and even Vaudeville style comedy.

General seating is $5 and tickets will be available one-hour prior to show time at the box office. The performance will be held in the Behan Arena Theatre in the lower level of the Annie Hogan Byrd building.

GLAWPIGT, which is celebrating its 30th year, is a literary performance group founded by Tusculum College Artist-in-Residence Marilyn duBrisk and sponsored by Tusculum College Arts Outreach. The group meets weekly during the academic year. It is comprised of students from East Tennessee ranging in ages from 10 to 17. For more information about the show case or GLAWPIGT, please contact Arts Outreach at 423-798-1620.

Another returning favorite is Joyce Carroll, puppet master. Carroll will be a puppet troubadour, appearing through the festival with spontaneous performances.

Sponsors of the event include Artistic Printers, Fatz Cafe, The Greeneville Sun, Radio Greeneville and Wayne Thomas.

There is no fee to attend the festival, other than the admission fee for the GLAWPIGT performances. Art vendor hours will be Friday from noon until 6 p.m. Author Row and the food vendors will remain open until 9 p.m. On Saturday, hours will be from 9 a.m. until 6 p.m. for art vendors and 9 p.m. for the rest of the festival. Sunday hours are 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. For more information, contact Price at 423-636-7303.

Coolers and alcohol are prohibited.

For updates and more information, visit the website at www.oldoakfestival.org or on facebook.

 

 

Crafters of all types will be featured at this weekend’s Old Oak Festival at Tusculum College, as well as music, theater and festival food.

 

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Tusculum to offer online and onsite summer term courses

Tusculum to offer online and onsite summer term courses

Posted on 07 April 2016 by srichey@tusculum.edu

Online, on-site courses, as well as dual enrollment for high school students are all being offered as course options in Tusculum College’s upcoming summer program. Tusculum will offer a variety of courses and course options for high school or college students wanting to get ahead in their college career or needing specific classes.

The first session, Term A, will be the week of May 9 through the week of June 11. The second session, Term B, will begin the week of June 13 and run through the week of July 23.

Education courses will be offered in three terms, the first is May 9 to May 28, the second is June 6 to July 2 and the third will run July 11 to August 6.

Summer offerings include a variety of courses in education, business and general studies and are being offered in Greeneville, Morristown and Knoxville. Many courses are being offered online during the summer term in order to best meet the demanding schedules of students. The full list of the courses can be found here.

Dual enrollment courses for current high school students include offerings in English, sociology, history, psychology and art.

“Summer term is a great time for anyone to get a few college credits completed,” said LeAnn Hughes, vice president of enrollment management and marketing. “High School students can get a jump on college through dual enrollment, and students in degree programs can use this time to get ahead or catch up or just to take a course that interests them. Additionally, the online option makes it easy to get the work done on whatever schedule the student may have.”

Competitive summer tuition rates, as well as a summer payment plan, are being offered, and registration is open now.

For more information or to register for courses, please contact the Office of the Registrar at 423-636-7300 ext. 5311. The Registrar’s Office is located in Office G-12 on the ground floor of Virginia Hall on the Greeneville campus. 

 

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Upgrades completed on Paul E. Hayden Educational Wetland at Tusculum College

Upgrades completed on Paul E. Hayden Educational Wetland at Tusculum College

Posted on 06 April 2016 by srichey@tusculum.edu

Vegetation removal and replacement, new signage and a walking tour brochure are among the improvements made recently at the Paul E. Hayden Educational Wetland at Tusculum College.

Cattail removal at the Wetlands

The projects, funded by a 319 grant administered by the Middle Nolichucky Watershed Alliance, were carried out with assistance from Kristen Lane, a graduate of Tusculum College and an Appalachia CARES AmeriCorps Member serving with MNWA, and Dan Barnett, former faculty member at Tusculum and the current chairman of the MNWA. Other key assistances was provided by Tim Ormond, hydrological engineer from Asheville, N.C.

The Paul E. Hayden Educational Wetland provides science students with an outdoor classroom and experiment center, while tending to the environment that supports campus life. In addition, the wetland provides stormwater retention from parking lots and roadways. This allows the pollutants to settle out of the water before it returns to College Creek and ultimately the Nolichucky River.

According to Lane, cattail removal was completed at the site in early spring, with more than 150 volunteers working at the wetlands in this effort to remove cattails and clean up the wetlands, as well as transplanting some other vegetation. Lane explained that the cattails had become invasive and were actually preventing the wetland from cleaning the moving stream as it was designed to do.

Additionally, signage has been added to describe the habitat for those who visit the wetland on their own. Barnett said that three separate signs were placed on the walkway. Each of the signs focuses on what the wetland is, how it works and what can be seen from the walkway. He added that a brochure with additional information about the Hayden Wetland is also in production that will be available at the site as well as online.

“By the end of April everything will be complete and in place and school students will be begin visiting in May,” said Barnett. More than 600 Greeneville and Greene County students have participated in educational programs at the wetland since its completion in 2013.

The 319 grant received by MNWA for the project came from the Environmental Protection Agency and the Tennessee Department of Agriculture. More than $15,000 has been spent on upgrades at the site to date.

“The wetland project is an invaluable resource to the environment and serves to support educational experiences for the science program. In addition to Tusculum students, this wetland is a community resource in which the college collaborates with the Greeneville City and Greene County school systems to provide an environment for research ranging from elementary education to college senior projects,” said Dr. Nancy Moody, president of the college.

In February, the Tusculum College Board of Trustees was informed that a gift had been received by the college that would allow for a pavilion to be constructed as part of the Paul E. Hayden Educational Wetland project, and plans are in the works. MNWA made an additional contribution to this project for some construction materials and architectural design.

The Hayden Wetland project has been collaboration with the MNWA since the beginning when Hayden headed the organization. The college continues to support MNWA by providing the organization office space on campus. Additionally, the living stipend for the AmeriCorps member position has been generously provided by Dr. Scott Niswonger, local businessman, philanthropist and member of the Tusculum College Board of Trustees.

“Tusculum College has been very supportive of the project,” said Barnett. “David Martin and the staff of facilities management has been very helpful, providing continued maintenance at the facility.”

The wetland was named in honor of the late Paul E. Hayden because of his commitment and dedication to seeing the project through to completion and his many years of environmental stewardship.

Before

 

 

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Music lineup announced for Old Oak Festival, April 15-17

Music lineup announced for Old Oak Festival, April 15-17

Posted on 31 March 2016 by eestes@tusculum.edu

The Carson Peters Band will be returning to the Old Oak Festival.

Fiddlin’ Carson Peters returns again to headline the Old Oak Festival, along with the Smoky Mountain Bluegrass band and a host of regional talent as the event will once again be held on the Tusculum College campus, April 15-17.

The Old Oak Festival features a wide variety of music, food and fun, spanning across three days and featuring something for everyone, be it live music, theater, arts and crafts or fabulous festival food.

Throughout the weekend on stage, the festival will present the sounds of the region, with a wide variety of music from bluegrass to jazz to regionally-known vocalists and musicians. Musicians kicking off the show on Friday include Bean Tree Remedy featuring Ashley Bean, Dave Nunez and the Perfect World Band, Mike Joy, My New Favorites and Prism – a tribute to Pink Floyd. Friday night will also feature Jack & Michael on the Terrace entertaining for an alumni event.

On Saturday, expect good old fashion fun from Shiloh and the Tusculum College Band closing out the night, but also plan to get to the festival early to hear the Stem Winder, the Thursday Night Boys, Jake Keasly & Friends, the Dandy Lions, Absinthe Gray, Jimmie D and the House Rockers and the Madisons.

The Carson Peters Band will be on the main stage on Saturday as well. Additionally on Saturday, some favorite features will be back, including the “Conduct Us” session with the Tusculum College Band, where anyone can step up and take over the conductor’s baton.

Smoky Mountain Bluegrass Band

Sunday’s artists include Jim and Curtis Moneyhun, Steve Brown, the Tusculum College Handbell Choir, the Matthew Hurd Band and the regional favorite, the Smoky Mountain Bluegrass band.

“The musical acts this year will provide a wide variety to suit all musical tastes, with some top rate performances on all three days,” said David Price, festival coordinator and director of music for Tusculum College.

A new feature for the Old Oak Festival this year will be horse and carriage rides, sponsored by Tymley Travel, and a lineup of 10 workshops designed for high school students, through which five participants will be awarded a $500 scholarship.

The high school workshops will be offered in morning and afternoon shifts, from 9-11 a.m. and 12:30-2:30 p.m. The morning workshops will consist of an educational wetland tour and nature writing, contemporary poetry, drawing, playwriting, and music theory and songwriting. Acting, brief essay or prose poem, tree identification, photo manipulation and songwriting will be offered in the afternoon.

Another returning favorite is Joyce Carroll, puppet master. Carroll will be a puppet troubadour, appearing through the festival with spontaneous performances.

As part of the entertainment, there will be three performances during the festival of GLAWPIGT (Great Literature Alive and Well and Playing in Greeneville, Tennessee) Showcase, presented by the group comprised of local students under the direction of Arts Outreach Director Marilyn duBrisk. Show times are Friday at 7 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m.

Performances will be held in the Behan Arena Theatre in the Annie Hogan Byrd Fine Arts Building.

Sponsors of the event include Artistic Printers, Fatz Cafe, The Greeneville Sun, Radio Greeneville and Wayne Thomas.

There is no fee to attend the festival, other than the admission fee to the GLAWPIGT performances. Art vendor hours will be Friday from noon until 6 p.m. Author Row and the food vendors will remain open until 9 p.m. On Saturday, hours will be from 9 a.m. until 6 p.m.  for art vendors and 9 p.m. for the rest of the festival. Sunday hours are 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. For more information, contact Price at 423-636-7303.

Coolers and alcohol are prohibited during the festival.

For updates and more information, visit the website at www.oldoakfestival.org or on facebook.

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Registration for fall 2016 semester begins next week

Registration for fall 2016 semester begins next week

Posted on 17 March 2016 by eestes@tusculum.edu

The next two weeks will be busy ones at Tusculum College as registration for the 2016 fall semester will begin for students in the traditional academic program.

Registration for rising and continuing juniors and seniors will be March 21 through 24. Registration will be open for continuing  freshmen and rising and continuing sophomores will be March 28 through April 1.

Students have been encouraged to visit various offices such as the Financial Aid, Business, the Registrar and Student Affairs to ensure the are ready to begin the registration process. A registration orientation event was held in February to allow students to finish this process.

In registering, students are to follow a set of steps. First,they are to make an appointment to meet with their academic adviser to discuss their schedule and the courses needed to continue on the path towards earning their degree. While it is important for students to regularly meet with their academic adviser, it is crucial for students to meet with their adviser in preparing their schedule for the fall as the College will be implementing a new schedule formatthat allows students to personalize and customize their schedules to a greater extent than in the current format.

Students then fill out a fall 2016 registration form and then visit the Business Office and Financial Aid (if their status was not cleared during the pre-registration visit).

Once that is completed, students submit their form to the Registrar’s Office.

For students living on campus, submitting their registration form enables them to complete the Housing Selection process.  Juniors and seniors will have housing placement preference as they will be able to complete the process a week ahead of the underclassmen. Students complete the process by submitting Housing Selection forms along with signed Housing License Agreements to Student Affairs. Students are able on these forms to indicate preference of residence hall on campus and indicate their preference for roommate(s).

However, after April 1, incoming students placements will begin, and current students who have not completed registration by the beginning of April will have their placements made as they are received.

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Tusculum College English majors honored at literary festival

Tusculum College English majors honored at literary festival

Posted on 16 March 2016 by srichey@tusculum.edu

Four Tusculum College students were recently recognized at the Hollins University 56th Annual Lex Allen Literary Festival in Roanoke, Virginia.

Students were invited to submit creative works for the festival’s contests in poetry and fiction, and Tusculum College English majors Macy French of Kingsport, Jennie Frost of Friendsville, Sarah Holly of Johnson City and Emily Waryck of New Concord, Ohio, were selected as finalists in the poetry category. Also attending was student Emily Watson of Watauga.

French’s poem, “Nature and Nurture in Binary,” was selected as runner-up winner in the poetry category. Work of the poetry finalists were read and discussed in a poetry panel comprised of poets Ricardo Pau-Llosa, Cathy Hankla and Jeanne Larsen.

The group, accompanied by Heather Patterson, English department chair and associate professor of English, were participants in the conference that included readings by Pulitzer Prize nominee, poet Ricardo Pau-Llosa, Los Angeles Times columnist and essayist Meghan Daum, and winner of the Berlin Prize Fellowship, novelist Fred Drury.

“It was a treat to see our students praised so highly by attendees of the festival. Hollins’s contest pool was quite large and impressively talented,” said Patterson.

“I can say with confidence that Tusculum College’s creative writing program is one of the best undergraduate writing programs currently operating, and I feel that folks outside of Tusculum are recognizing that fact more and more. The writers who come out of our program are being published in esteemed journals, winning awards, being hired for internships and jobs and getting into top-notch graduate school programs. We can now add more success at Lex Allen to our long and lengthening list of our students’ achievements.”

 

Tusculum students competed against 211 entrants in poetry from colleges and universities in the United States and Canada, including Stanford University, Hollins University, University of Arizona, Georgetown University, University of Pittsburg, Malone University, Austin Peay State University, Pennsylvania State University at Erie and the University of Toronto.

 

From left to right: Emily Waryck (finalist), Emily Watson, Sarah Holly (finalist), Jennie Frost (finalist) and Macy French (runner-up winner).

 

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Exterior framing, roofwork progressing on new science and math center

Exterior framing, roofwork progressing on new science and math center

Posted on 10 March 2016 by srichey@tusculum.edu

With the roofing seals going into place this week, construction of the Ronald H. and Verna June Meen Center for Science and Math at Tusculum College continues to progress at a steady rate.

As of the first week of March, exterior framing and sheathing is approximately 90 percent complete, according to David Martin, director of facilities at Tusculum College. “The lecture hall slab on grade is being poured in multiple sequences and will be complete this week,” he said.

“Waterproofing and window installation, as well as mechanical, electrical and fire protection trades are continuing as we work towards the milestones of permanent power and unit startup.”

The Meen Center for Science and Math will be a four-story structure of approximately 100,000 square feet. Interiors include wings for biology, chemistry, mathematics, computer science and environmental science. There will also be lab space and research areas for both faculty and students.

The ground floor features the environmental science wing with a loading dock, as well as large general classroom spaces and classrooms equipped for distance learning programs. A large lecture hall will be included on the ground floor. Space is also allocated to house the Bachelor of Science degree program in nursing and at least one other graduate level health-related program.

 

Construction continues on the Ronald H. and Verna June Meen Center for Science and Math with roofing seals being put into place.

Windows have started to be installed as exterior framing is nearing completion.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The side of the building opposite Pioneer Field and the entrance on that side below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tusculum College announces nurse practitioner program

Tusculum College announces nurse practitioner program

Posted on 24 February 2016 by srichey@tusculum.edu

Tusculum College will offer the Master of Science in nursing degree with a concentration in family nurse practitioner in August, pending approval by SACSCOC. The college was given approval by the Tennessee Board of Nursing on Thursday to move forward in implementing the new degree program.

The family nurse practitioner program is a graduate level Master of Science degree program designed to address the need for more primary healthcare providers in the community. It will be led by Dr. Linda Garrett, assistant dean of nursing, health sciences and human services and chair of graduate nursing.

“In East Tennessee, there is a gap between the number of people who need healthcare and the number of healthcare providers,” said Dr. Lois Ewen, dean of nursing, health sciences and human services. “The nurse practitioner program will help fill that gap in our community,” she added.

“Nurse practitioners provide primary care across the lifespan to people of all ages with simple to complex illnesses. We provide care for patients that have comorbidities. We have the same privileges that family physicians have, such as prescribing medications,” said Dr. Garrett.

Applications for enrollment in the program will be available in late spring.  The first class is tentatively set to graduate in fall 2017.

“One of the things that is very special about this program, especially in this part of the country, is that we plan to develop an RN to MSN program, which will allow nurses with associate degrees to obtain their master’s degree in six semesters,” said Dr. Garrett.

With this bridge component, Dr. Ewen hopes to serve more nurses in the area and serve the community with quality advanced practice nurses. The nurse practitioner program will be housed in the Ronald H. and Verna June Meen Center for Math and Science, where the students will have access to state-of-the-art equipment specialized for their degree.

“The Ronald H. and Verna June Meen Center for Math and Science will provide students with a lab separate from the lab for the undergraduate program,” said Dr. Garrett. “The undergraduate lab is styled like a hospital, the nurse practitioner labs will be designed much like a typical medical office with high technological recording capabilities.”

Dr. Garrett hopes to work with the theater program at Tusculum and have people trained as “standardized patients.” These standardized patients would act as real patients through scenarios developed by the nursing faculty in order to assist nurse practitioner students in patient interaction and diagnosis.

“We are excited to have Dr. Garrett on our team,” said Dr. Ewen. “She has served as a leader, an educator and a nurse, and brings a tremendous amount of experience in developing successful nursing programs to Tusculum College.”

Dr. Garrett said, “My vision is to provide the community with primary care providers–this is an area of need—to provide the folks in this community access to good quality care and to get the nurse practitioner program going and graduating students.”

Individuals with interest in attending the family nurse practitioner program should contact the nursing department at nursing@tusculum.edu or 423-636-7430 for more information.  Tusculum College is now accepting applications for admission into the College.

 

By Stephanie Turner, senior journalism and professional writing major from Shelbyville, Tenn.

 

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New academic programming under discussion at Tusculum

New academic programming under discussion at Tusculum

Posted on 23 February 2016 by srichey@tusculum.edu

The Tusculum College Board of Trustees approved the addition of a minor in business for non-business majors and heard a report on programs under consideration for inclusion in the Tusculum College catalog of degree programs at their winter meeting on the Greeneville campus, Feb 19-20.

The board met for two days, which included a breakfast on Saturday morning hosted by the Tusculum College President’s Society. The breakfast included time for the members of the Board of Trustees to get to know some of the school’s current students.

The Board approved the new minor in business for non-business majors and heard reports on the potential addition of several new degree programs, including a nurse practitioner master’s degree program, a bachelor degree program in health care administration and a bachelor’s degree program in computer science.

“As an institution it is important that we continue to be responsive to the students we serve as well as the communities around us,” said Dr. Kenneth A. Bowman, chair of the Board and 1970 alumnus of the college. “Changing, and particularly adding degree programs, allows us serve the needs of students today and into the future.”

In other action, the Board heard reports on the Tusculum First Capital Campaign and the Technology Improvement Plan.

To date, $19.8 million has been raised toward the $25 million capital campaign goal. According to Heather Patchett, vice president of institutional advancement, it is anticipated that the campaign will be at the $23 million mark by the end of the fiscal year, June 30.

According to Campaign Chairman Scott M. Niswonger, as a member of the Tusculum College Board of Trustees, Tusculum First is designed to address the college’s areas of greatest need including a new center for science and math, growth of academic programs, endowed scholarships, student life improvements, technology, an environmental resources and facilities center and support to the Tusculum Fund.

In support of the Technology Improvement Plan, the Tusculum College website has been updated to make the site more user friendly and efficient to navigate, with the new homepage launched in October. Additional changes will be coming to maximize marketing and advertising opportunities for Enrollment Management and Marketing. In addition Tusculum College now supports two degree programs that are fully online and the dual enrollment program has grown to more than 70 area high school students during the 2015-16 academic year. Since its beginning, the distance education program enrollment in online courses has grown from 129 in 2010 to more than 700 in 2016.

As part of their meeting, the Board received an update on the college’s strategic planning process. As part of this process, at their October board meeting, the trustees set aside time for a strategic planning session, led by consultant, Dr. Kris Cohen, vice president for strategy at CREDO. Dr. Cohen has worked in higher education since 1989.

Planning sessions have also been held with faculty and staff, as well as with students.

“The community wide participation in this process is extremely valuable,” said Dr. Nancy B. Moody, president of Tusculum College. “The established initiatives that result from this process will set the direction for Tusculum College long into the future.”

Additionally, the Board received an update from Dr. Claude O. Pressnell, Jr., president of the Tennessee Independent Colleges and Universities Association on the future of higher education and the implications for independent higher education institutions in the state.

The Board heard a facilities report, which included an update on the construction of the Ronald H. and Verna June Meen Center for Science and Math. The new Center for Science and Math is expected to be completed in time for spring semester next year.  An announcement was made that a gift had been received to the college that would allow for a pavilion to be constructed as part of the Paul E. Hayden Educational Wetland project. The gift, combined with a grant received from the Nolichucky Watershed Alliance, will provide for construction materials for the pavilion.

In other action of the board, May graduation candidates were approved, pending satisfactory completion of course of study work, approval by the faculty and certification by the registrar. Also approved were faculty promotions which included: Dr. Eva Cowell and Dr. Clay Matthews, promoted to associate professor; and Dr. Joel Van Amberg, promoted to full professor.

The next meeting of the Tusculum College Board of Trustees will be May 2016.

 

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Tusculum student receives Northwestern Mutual internship award

Tusculum student receives Northwestern Mutual internship award

Posted on 04 February 2016 by srichey@tusculum.edu

Northwestern Mutual has honored Tusculum College senior Kevin Jerome with its 2016 Southern Region Top Ten Intern award. The honor recognizes Jerome for an outstanding year with Northwestern Mutual, serving the financial security needs of clients and policy owners throughout the region.

“In a world of financial uncertainty, Northwestern Mutual financial experts like Kevin Jerome have helped deliver confidence to thousands of families,” says Greg Oberland, Northwestern Mutual president.

Kevin Jerome

During his internship with Northwestern Mutual, Jerome, an international business and economics major from Johnson City, offered personalized solutions that helped people reduce financial vulnerability and address a lifetime of needs and goals.

Through an on-campus recruiting event, he landed the internship with Northwestern Mutual. After only a few months, he was ranked nationally as Northwestern Mutual’s seventh leading intern in productivity.

In addition to school and work, Jerome is also a volunteer with the Young Professionals of Tri-Cities, Habitat for Humanity and Pou Yi Mou’n Yo, a charitable organization for children.

After graduation in May, Jerome will join the Atlanta office of Northwestern Mutual as a full time employee.

Robin Lay, director of Career Services at Tusculum College, helped Jerome apply for his internship and said, “Kevin has the unique confidence to ask very successful people for career advice—mixed with enough humility to make him teachable—which means that he will continue to grow personally and professionally.”

Northwestern Mutual financial professionals provide a comprehensive approach to financial planning in order to help clients meet a variety of personal and business needs. Clients are able to obtain personalized financial solutions through Northwestern Mutual’s commitment to financial strength, expertise with time-tested planning principles and comprehensive approach to planning – accompanied by a financial professional’s long-term commitment to listen, guide and encourage.

 

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