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About 300 scheduled to earn degrees during Spring Commencement May 6

About 300 scheduled to earn degrees during Spring Commencement May 6

Posted on 10 April 2017 by eestes@tusculum.edu

About 300 Tusculum College students will celebrate a major milestone on Saturday, May 6, as they mark the successful completion of their educational journey by earning degrees during the Spring Commencement Ceremony that day.

Two ceremonies are planned and both will take place in the Pioneer Arena of the Niswonger Commons. The first will be at 10 a.m. and will include students earning degrees from the Traditional College program, as well as students earning Master’s degrees in education and business. The second ceremony will be at 2 p.m. and include students earning Master’s degrees and the students earning Bachelor’s degrees from the Graduate and Professional Studies bachelor’s programs.

Tusculum College applauds the graduates for their hard-earned achievements and is preparing for May 6 as a day of celebration for the newest alumni and their families. The College is busy making preparations to make the day a memorable one and you can help.

Family members are asked to carpool if possible rather than bring multiple cars to the ceremony to help lessen congestion on campus. As you arrive on campus, security personnel will direct you to a parking area and shuttles will provided from outer parkings lots to the Niswonger Commons.

If you are any of your family members or guests requires special handicapped seating accommodations, please contact Bobbie Greenway at 423-636-7300 ext. 5154 so your needs can be addressed. There will be handicapped parking available in the large parking lot at the Niswonger Commons. Please let the security personnel directing traffic and parking know that you need handicapped parking if it is needed and they will direct you to the lot. Please note that Tusculum will not be able to provide wheelchairs. Those with special seating accommodations are asked to arrive at least 45 minutes prior to the beginning of the ceremony.

You can also help by helping your graduate be at the Pioneer Arena in time for graduation practice. For the morning ceremony, practice begins at 8:45 a.m. and it begins 12:45 p.m. for the 2 p.m. ceremony. Graduates who arrive prior to the practice times are asked to report to the cafeteria.

Graduates are not allowed to have personnel items such as purses and cameras with them during the ceremony. You can assist them by obtaining these items from them prior to graduation practice and holding them.  Prior to the practice is a good time for this and other communication between you and your graduate because after graduation practice, the graduates go to the cafeteria where they placed in order for the procession and for the ceremony. It is easier for the College staff getting the graduates in line if they stay inside the cafeteria during this period.

The Pioneer Arena will open for guest seating after completion of the rehearsal. Guests are asked to arrive at least 30 minutes prior to the beginning of the ceremony.

No tickets are required for graduation and there is no limit on the number of guests per graduate. However, to help provide seating for all, guests are asked to not hold seats for others in the last 45 minutes prior to the beginning of the ceremony.

Programs will be placed on the seat of each graduate and they will be distributed to guests at the Pioneer Arena primary entrances. The program will also posted on the Tusculum web site following the ceremony. For graduates unable to attend the ceremony, diplomas will be mailed to the graduates’ home addresses after Commencement Day provided all academic and financial obligations are satisfied.

To help preserve the prestigious decorum of the commencement ceremony, guests are asked to observe the following:

  • As a courtesy to other attendees, please consider making alternative arrangements for very young children.  Due to fire marshal regulations, no baby carriers or strollers will be allowed in the auditorium.
  • Cell phones are to be turned off or switched to the silent operating mode during the ceremony.  Do not speak on a cell phone or carry on a conversation during the ceremony as this prevents others from hearing and enjoying the ceremony.
  • Commencement is both a joyous and solemn event.  Please express your excitement in ways that will not prevent others from hearing the speaker and enjoying the ceremony.  Use of air horns, yelling or stomping are disruptive.
  • Please refrain from taking pictures until after your graduate receives his or her diploma.  This will allow the ceremony to flow smoothly and reduce the distractions and disturbances to other audience members as they try to see and hear ongoing presentations.
  • As a courtesy to and out of respect for your fellow graduates, you and your family are requested to remain in the auditorium until the conclusion of the ceremony. At the conclusion of the ceremony, the faculty traditionally forms a gauntlet and applauds the graduates as they recess from the auditorium.  We ask that your family and friends be respectful of this tradition and remain in the auditorium until the graduates have exited the auditorium.

 

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Old Oak Festival to feature wide variety of musical performances

Old Oak Festival to feature wide variety of musical performances

Posted on 03 April 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

Jazz, country, gospel, bluegrass and rock and roll are a few of the musical stylings that will be featured at the 2017 Old Oak Festival planned April 21-23 on the campus of Tusculum.

Featuring a wide variety of music and food and fun, the Old Oak Festival will span across three days, featuring something for everyone, be it live music, theater, arts and crafts or fabulous festival food.

“We are very excited about the wide variety of performers that we have committed to this year’s festival,” said David Price, director of music and band programs at Tusculum and coordinator of the festival.

“This year’s musical acts offer something for everyone and show off amazing artistic talent from folks in our region and beyond.”

While the list of musical performers is not complete, currently several bands have announced plans to perform and include the Brother Boys, My New Favorites, Shiloh, Ashley Bean, Sigean, the Dread Scots, Poplar Hill Reunion, the Tusculum Jazz Band, the Tusculum Marching Band, the Tusculum Concert Band, the Tusculum Handbell Choir and the Bluegrass Outlaws.

There will also be jam sessions during the festival and visitors are encouraged to bring their instrument and join for a weekend of fun with other musicians.

In addition to music, workshops for high school students will be held on Friday and include sessions on the Math and Science of Tree Identification, Contemporary Poetry, Instrumental Master Class (Band), Vocal Master Class, Introduction to Programming with Python, Drawing, the Brief Essay or Prose Poem, Medieval Siege Warfare, Songwriting, Playwriting, Political Jeopardy, Flash Fiction, SM-Art! Sensational Mathematical Art, as well as Animation, Abel Brown, as well as Shimmy and the Burns.

Workshops are presented by faculty of Tusculum and other experts in the field.

There is no charge for students to participate in the workshop sessions and lunch will be provided.  Students need to register by Wednesday, April 12. To reserve a spot, contact Kelsey Trom, assistant professor of English at ktrom@tusculum.edu or (423) 636-7420 ext. 5420.

The Museums of Tusculum College will be hosting the Old Oak’s second annual LEGO contest, “LEGO® Historians!” Participants, using their own LEGO® or other compatible plastic bricks, design and build a unique creation (not from a designed kit) based on any historical topic. Registration is open now. Deliver completed projects to the Doak House Museum, 690 Erwin Highway, Greeneville 37745. Projects may be dropped off from April 17-20, between the hours of 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.

The museums will also operate a Family Photo Preservation Station during the Old Oak Festival. The public is invited to bring up to 20 family photographs or 20 pages of family documents (letters, certificates, etc.) for digital scanning and preservation. Documents or photos will be scanned and saved to a writable CD which we will provide, or bring a personal thumb drive. Participants will also receive a handy guide to caring for their family heirlooms according to best archival & museum standards. RSVP to dboyd@tusculum.edu or 4123-636-8554 to sign up for an appointment time.

Other special events planned for this year’s festival include an art show at Allison Gallery, student theater productions and literary readings.

New this year will be archery tag, sponsored by the Tusculum Office of Student Affairs. Archery tag is played similar to dodgeball with our bows and patented foam-tipped arrows. This exciting, action-packed game offers the ultimate family-friendly experience that engages everyone.

There is no fee to attend the festival. Art vendor hours will be Friday from noon until 6 p.m., Saturday from 9 a.m. until 6 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Entertainment and food continues into the evening, with the final performers ending at 10 p.m.

Service animals are welcome; however, no pets allowed. Coolers, firearms and alcohol are also prohibited on the Tusculum campus property during the festival. Lawn chairs and blankets are encouraged.

The event is being sponsored by the Old Oak Tap Room, Artistic Printers, The Greeneville Sun and Radio Greeneville.

For updates and more information, visit the website at www.oldoakfestival.org or on facebook. For more information on registering as a vendor or performer or volunteering at the festival, contact Price at 423-636-7303.

 

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Tusculum announces summer dual enrollment courses

Tusculum announces summer dual enrollment courses

Posted on 31 March 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

Registration is now open for summer dual enrollment classes at Tusculum.

High school students with a 3.0 grade point average or a 21 on the ACT are eligible to take dual enrollment courses the summer before their junior year. The courses will be offered online. Students should contact their counselors in order to see if they qualify and if they are eligible for financial assistance.

High school students have the opportunity to earn  college credit through the dual enrollment program at Tusculum. Through the program, high school students can take course in a wide variety of academic areas.

Classes will be offered May 29 through July 29, with a registration deadline of May 22.

Course available include “Baroque through Modern Art History,” “Computer as a Tool,” “World Literature,” U.S. Survey I,” “Elementary Statistics,” “Essentials of Psychology,” and “Principles of Social Institutions.”

For more information please contact Melissa Ripley at mripley@tusculum.edu or

1.800.729.0256 Ext. 5374.

 

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Curtis Owens literary prize winners announced at Tusculum

Curtis Owens literary prize winners announced at Tusculum

Posted on 29 March 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

Tusculum students Macy French and Emily Waryck are the winners of the 2017 Curtis and Billie Owens Literary Awards.

The awards, which are given annually to recognize the literary achievements of the college’s students, are open to all Tusculum students.

French, a senior creative writing major from Kingsport, won the drama category; Waryck a senior creative writing major from New Concord, Ohio, picked up the prizes for poetry, fiction and nonfiction.

The winners’ works will be included in a publication to be released during the 2017 Old Oak Festival, April 21-23. Additionally, the winners will read their selections at the Tusculum Review Launch Party scheduled as part of the festival.

The Curtis and Billie Owens Literary Awards are annually given to recognize the literary achievements of Tusculum College’s creative writing students. The literary award was named for Curtis Owens, a 1928 graduate of Tusculum who went on to a teaching career at what is now Pace University in New York. He and his wife established the award at his alma mater to encourage and reward excellence in writing among Tusculum students.

The event also featured readings by contest judge Ada Limon, and was part of the Humanities Series, sponsored by the Tusculum College English Department.

Limon is the author of four books of poetry including “Bright Dead Things,” which was named a finalist for the 2015 National Book Award in Poetry, a finalist for the 2015 National Book Critics Circle Award, and one of the Top Ten Poetry Books of the Year by the “New York Times.” Ada Limon will present cash awards to the student winners in poetry, fiction, nonfiction and scriptwriting and will read from her own work.

 

From left, student winner Macy French, Judge Ada Limon and student winner Emily Waryck.

 

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Tusculum students presented at regional honors conference

Tusculum students presented at regional honors conference

Posted on 15 March 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

Four Tusculum students made presentations at the 2017 Southern Regional Honors Council Conference to be held in Asheville, North Carolina, March 30-April 1.

“We are proud of and very excited for our stellar honors students who have been accepted to present at such as prestigious honors conference in Asheville,” said Dr. Troy Goodale, associate professor of political science and faculty liaison to the Tusculum Honors Program.  “These are exciting times for the Tusculum Honors Program, and moving forward we anticipate taking advantage of more opportunities to highlight and showcase the undergraduate research that many of our best students are producing.”

Students Macy French, a senior English major from Kingsport; Hannah Arnett, a senior museum studies major from Butler; Shannele Sunderland, a senior sports science major from Austin, Texas; and Darian Tipton, a senior mathematics major from Shelbyville, represented Tusculum by presenting original research at the conference.

French presented “Ethics of Persona,” which deals with the controversial question of pseudonyms writers may use when submitting literary work for publication.

“I’m thrilled to represent Tusculum, as well as the Honors Program, at this event. It will be a great opportunity to network with other honors students from around the region and gain valuable experience giving a presentation on this level,” said French prior to the presentation.

Arnett’s presentation is about ethical implications in public history, and how public historians—museum professionals, specifically—can create open, inclusive dialogue about the past.

“People think about history differently, and they have their own unique, preconceived notions about the past that aren’t always accurate, or even true,” said Arnett. “I hope to offer some suggestions as to why these differences exist, and how professionals can better act as mediators between diverse public understanding and academic reality.”

Sunderland’s project focuses on the risk factors of anterior cruciate ligament tears and risk factors including, gender, sport played, location and field conditions.

“The Honors Program has given me the opportunity to complete research projects beyond what we are offered in our other classes,” said Sunderland prior to the conference. “I will have the opportunity to present in front of a large audience, and I am excited for this as it will push me outside of my comfort zone.”

Tipton will present on tutoring techniques of peer tutors that are currently being utilized in order to establish a standard for best practices.

Excited about the opportunity to present, Tipton said, “The Honors Program has provided me with both a sense of community and a sense of direction, which I believe directly contributed to me remaining in college even when that seemed improbable.”

Meagan Stark, director of the Honors Program, said everyone involved is incredibly proud of the quality of scholarly work our honors students are capable of producing.

“Their invitation to present research at SRHC indicates that our honors students are academically competitive inside and outside the institution,” she said.

The theme of this year’s conference was “Diving into Diversity: Opportunities and Obligations in Honors Education.”

According to Stark, Tusculum’s focus on civic engagement places the school’s honors students in an exceptional position to speak to the obligations honors students have as informed citizens and engaged leaders.  “All of their projects demonstrate a desire to expand our understanding of the world for the betterment of all.”

The host institution for the 2017 conference was the University of North Carolina – Asheville.

Back from left are Dr. Troy Goodale, faculty liaison and Meagan Stark, director of the Tusculum Honors Program. From left, seated, are Shannele Sunderland, Macy French, Darian Tipton and Hannah Arnett. The students have been selected to present at an upcoming regional honors conference.

 

 

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Tusculum hosts local high school students for College Summit

Posted on 12 March 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

Students from the four county high schools were given information to help them prepare for the college application process during the annual College Summit at Tusculum on Friday, March 10.

Eleventh graders from North Greene, South Greene, West Greene and Chuckey-Doak high schools attended the event at Tusculum, hosted by Advise TN. Students also attended a College Fair at Walters State Community College in Greeneville as part of their day.

Advise TN is a college advising and capacity building program developed by the Tennessee Higher Education Commission and the Office of Governor Bill Haslam. Advise TN aims to increase the number of Tennesseans accessing higher education by partnering with high schools and providing college advising services to up to 10,000 junior and senior students across Tennessee.

“The ultimate goal of the program is to develop a college-going culture in the Greene County School System,” said Ruth Ann Tipton, a college advisor for Advise TN. “We want every high school student to know they can go to college and that through Tennessee Promise, the financial resources are available to them to make it happen.”

Welcoming the high school students to campus, Tusculum President Nancy B. Moody encouraged the juniors to pursue education following graduation whether it is at a technical school, a community college, a state university or a private college.

Following the opening session, the students met with enrollment representatives who discussed college admission test preparation, college interviews, financial aid and admission processes and college life.

The students were then treated to a tour of the Tusculum campus.

 

The College Summit at Tusculum on Friday gave local high school students an opportunity to hear first-hand about the college application process from Tusculum President Nancy B. Moody.

 

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Old Oak Festival returns to Tusculum College April 21-23

Old Oak Festival returns to Tusculum College April 21-23

Posted on 10 March 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

The Old Oak Festival will return to Tusculum College campus Friday, April 21 through Sunday, April 23.

Featuring a wide variety of music and food and fun, the Old Oak Festival will span across three days, featuring something for everyone, be it live music, theater, arts and crafts or fabulous festival food.

Throughout the weekend on stage, the festival will present the sounds of the region, with a wide variety of music from bluegrass to jazz featuring local vocalists and instrumentalists.

There are limited spaces still available for artisan and crafter booths. Deadline for reserving a booth is March 31, or until all spaces are filled.

“This year’s festival is looking to be bigger and better, with great arts and crafts, performances and opportunities to enjoy a variety of fine arts experiences,” said David Price, director of Music and Band programs at Tusculum College.

This year’s special events will include an art show at Allison Gallery, student theater productions, literary readings, a student day on Friday and the return of the Lego construction contest.

While the list of musical performers is not complete, currently several bands have announced plans to perform and include the Brother Boys, My New Favorites, Shiloh, Ashley Bean, Sigean, the Dread Scots, Poplar Hill Reunion, the Tusculum Jazz Band, the Tusculum Marching Band, the Tusculum Concert Band, the Tusculum Handbell Choir and the Bluegrass Outlaws.

There will also be jam sessions during the festival and visitors are encouraged to bring their instrument and join for a weekend of fun with other musicians.

Workshops for high school students will be held on Friday and include sessions on the Math and Science of Tree Identification, Contemporary Poetry, Instrumental Master Class (Band), Vocal Master Class, Introduction to Programming with Python, Drawing, the Brief Essay or Prose Poem, Medieval Siege Warfare, Songwriting, Playwriting, Political Jeopardy, Flash Fiction, SM-Art! Sensational Mathematical Art, as well as Animation.

Workshops are presented by faculty of Tusculum and other experts in the field.

There is no charge for students to participate in the workshop sessions and lunch will be provided.  Students need to register by Wednesday, April 12. To reserve a spot, contact Kelsey Trom, assistant professor of English at ktrom@tusculum.edu or (423) 636-7420 ext. 5420.

Other special events planned for this year’s festival include an art show at Allison Gallery, student theater productions and literary readings.

There is no fee to attend the festival. Art vendor hours will be Friday from noon until 6 p.m., Saturday from 9 a.m. until 6 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Entertainment and food continues into the evening, with the final performers ending at 10 p.m.

Service animals are welcome; however, no pets allowed. Coolers, firearms and alcohol are also prohibited on the Tusculum campus property during the festival. Lawn chairs and blankets are encouraged.

For updates and more information, visit the website at www.oldoakfestival.org or on facebook. For more information on registering as a vendor or performer or volunteering at the festival, contact Price at 423-636-7303.

 

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Stay prepared for severe weather and possible schedule changes

Stay prepared for severe weather and possible schedule changes

Posted on 07 March 2017 by eestes@tusculum.edu

The possibility of severe weather last week was a reminder to the entire Tusculum College community about the importance of staying prepared for changing weather conditions and to have access to communications from the College about possible schedule changes.

While this winter has been relatively mild in East Tennessee, spring does bring the chance of severe thunderstorms and tornadoes to this region. To help ensure safety during a weather event, it is important for all students and all members of the Tusculum community to be aware of how cancellation or dismissal of classes and other schedule changes are communicated, make sure they have access to one of those lines of communication  and to heed any alerts to take shelter in case of severe weather.

Specific schedule changes will be communicated through the Tusculum College Pioneer Alert System, the Tusculum College website and social media (Facebook and Twitter) and local media outlets (radio and television stations in Greeneville, Morristown, Johnson City and Knoxville) as soon as possible.

Tusculum students, faculty and staff can sign up for the Pioneer Alert system, which sends messages through text and email. In the case of severe weather, messages are sent through this system about the forecast. as well as ad a reminder of the location of the emergency shelter on campus, which is the basement area underneath the Pioneer Arena in the Niswonger Commons.   Messages also provide instructions for sheltering in place if the emergency shelter cannot be reached safely.

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Fall class registration for traditional program begins later this month

Fall class registration for traditional program begins later this month

Posted on 07 March 2017 by eestes@tusculum.edu

While spring is around the corner, registration for the fall 2017 semester is coming soon for the traditional program.

While students are enjoying spring break this week, they will find themselves busy once they return to campus with not just classes but some important events in the coming weeks.

Advising and registration for the fall 2017 semester in the traditional program will begin later this month. Registration for juniors and seniors is scheduled for the week of March 20-24. The following week, March 27-31, will be registration for freshmen and sophomores.

In February, students were encouraged to participate in “The Registration Games,” a process that allowed them to check with the Business Office, Office of Financial Aid and the Registrar to make sure that they are ready to register for classes once registration begins. Students who participated in the “Registration Games” on Feb. 7 and 8 will received priority housing consideration. Those who completed the process after Feb. 8 will receive housing consideration on a first-come first-serve basis.

As part of the registration process, students are strongly encouraged to meet with their academic advisors to create a class schedule as well as visit the Business Office to make sure their are no holds on their account prior to submitting their registration form to the Registrar’s Office.

Registration is just the first of series of significant events on campus in the coming months. In April, students will recognized for their academic achievements during the annual Honors Convocation, which will be on Wednesday, April 26.

Also on April 26, seniors will have the opportunity to participate in the Lantern Festival. This long-held Tusculum College tradition allows seniors to chose an underclassmen to whom to “pass their light of leadership.” Seniors are also able to present a Lantern Award to professors who have had a significant impact on their Pioneer experience at Tusculum.

Spring commencement ceremonies will be on Saturday, May 6.

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Tusculum President Dr. Nancy Moody announces retirement

Tusculum President Dr. Nancy Moody announces retirement

Posted on 28 February 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

Dr. Nancy B. Moody, the first female to serve as president of Tusculum College, will retire at the end of 2017.

Dr. Moody submitted her letter of intent to the Tusculum Board of Trustees during their February meeting. She will continue to serve until December 31. She has served as president of Tusculum College since 2009.

Dr. Kenneth A. Bowman, chair of the board and 1970 alumnus of the college, said that a presidential search committee is being formed and will be chaired by Dr. Greg Nelson, a Tusculum College trustee. The Board will also be interviewing search firms for possible use in the search for a new president.

In her letter, Dr. Moody stated, “I am honored to have had the opportunity to serve as the 27th president, and first female president, of this historic institution. In the last 7.5 years, the most memorable events for me have been the relationships that I have had the good fortune of developing with students, the Board of Trustees, alumni, members of the local community, faculty and staff, and particularly with donors, most notably Verna June Meen.

“Verna June came to love Tusculum and her interactions at events with members of the Board and others.  She expressed on more than one occasion, how proud she was to have provided support to Tusculum College for the Meen Center for Science and Math and for two endowments, one to fund scholarships and one to fund an endowed professorship in Chemistry.”

Dr. Bowman said, “It was eight years ago that Dr. Moody began the interview process for the presidency at Tusculum College.  During her tenure, she has led the college into a new era of growth and expansion, in terms of bricks and mortar, academic programs and fiscal responsibility.”

He added that one of the highlights of her term has been the construction of the Meen Center, the larger of the two academic building constructed in approximately 50 years on the Tusculum campus. The Thomas G. Garland Library renovation was the first in 2008. Dr. Moody shepherded the state-of-the-art 100,000-square foot Meen Center project every step of the way, from the initial approval to the funding and finally to overseeing the construction of this state-of-the-art facility which was occupied by students and faculty last month.

Dr. Nancy B. Moody

He added, since assuming the college presidency as the first female in Tusculum’s history to hold the position, Dr. Moody has faced several challenges.

“During her first full year at Tusculum College, we had a very successful review by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges. Since that time, we have added new academic programs including criminal justice, bachelor’s and master’s degrees in nursing, an MBA program, the first associate degree program with more academic programs slated to begin this fall including a bachelor’s degree in healthcare management, a bachelor’s degree in talent development and a Master of Accountancy degree, all of which have been or will be reviewed and approved by SACSCOC.  We have also added new athletic programs in men’s and women’s lacrosse, track and field and STUNT, which will begin this fall.”

He continued, “Dr. Moody has embraced the opportunity to encourage faculty, staff, students and volunteers to push Tusculum College forward through creative teaching and learning into the world of online programming for dual enrollment, distance education and fully online programs.”

She has secured a total of $49.8 million in Community Facilities direct loans from the U.S. Department of Agriculture for the construction of the new science and math facility, as well as for the construction of two new apartment-style residence halls. The lower 40-year, fixed-rate interest rates on these loans significantly lowered what the college pays in debt service, making the new construction and renovation possible while also improving the college’s overall finances.

Dr. Moody also led the efforts that secured a $3.875 million gift for the naming of the Meen Center and two $1.5 million endowments to support faculty and students. She has successfully sought new gifts, donors and partnership in order to ensure the success of the new and existing programs. Working with donors, foundations and government agencies, she has encouraged the investment of millions of dollars into Tusculum College’s growth.

Dr. Bowman added that during her tenure, cash increased from $1.3 million to $3.7 million, long-term investments increased from $12.5 million to $27.7 million, capital assets increased from $58.9 million to $71.8 million and the college’s endowment increased from $14 million to $18.6 million.

The college’s Board of Trustees recognized Dr. Moody’s contributions to Tusculum by presenting her with the inaugural Founder’s Award in February 2013. The Founders’ Award, named in memory of Rev. Samuel Doak, Rev. Samuel Witherspoon Doak and Rev. Hezekiah Balch, is presented by the Tusculum College Board of Trustees to recognize those who with integrity, tenacity, commitment, ingenuity and drive have moved Tusculum College forward in serving its students, its community and the world at large.

Among other significant accomplishments, Dr. Moody was instrumental in obtaining a $264,000 grant from the BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee Health Foundation for a simulation laboratory for use in the nursing and related programs by students and staff and area community partners. The simulation lab is used to produce highly-qualified BSN graduates skilled at clinical decision-making, who will provide safe, competent and improved health care for future generations of Tennesseans.

Partnerships with other institutions are at an all-time high. Tusculum College has arranged articulation and affiliation agreements with regional community colleges and professional schools to both increase enrollment in the bachelor’s degree programs and afford expedited graduate school opportunities for alumni of Tusculum College.

“She has engaged with alumni and friends of the College, encouraging their continued interest and support in the institution. She has reminded all of the Tusculum community what it means to be a Tusculum Pioneer,” said Dr. Bowman.

Prior to joining Tusculum College, Dr. Moody was president of Lincoln Memorial University for seven years.  Under her leadership, LMU’s enrollment increased by 90 percent.  The university also initiated the Lincoln Memorial University-DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine and expanded the Caylor School of Nursing to include a master of science in nursing degree program with family nurse practitioner and nurse anesthesia concentrations.  Other programs initiated under her leadership included a master’s degree program preparing physician’s assistants and a doctorate of education degree.

A registered nurse, Dr. Moody began her academic career as a nursing instructor for Lincoln Memorial University in 1974 and advanced to hold several academic leadership positions there – including dean of the School of Nursing and Allied Health.  associate professor and department chair in the College of Nursing at East Tennessee State University, as the executive director of the Tennessee Center for Nursing, as assistant professor of nursing in the College of Nursing at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

Prior to joining Tusculum College, Dr. Moody was president of Lincoln Memorial University for seven years.  Under her leadership, LMU’s enrollment increased by 90 percent.  The university also initiated the Lincoln Memorial University-DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine and expanded the Caylor School of Nursing to include a master of science in nursing degree program with family nurse practitioner and nurse anesthesia concentrations.  Other programs initiated under her leadership included a master’s degree program preparing physician’s assistants and a doctorate of education degree.

She is the newly-elected chair of the Board of Trustees of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges, and has served as chair of the NCAA DII South Atlantic Conference, and an advisory board member for the Northeast Tennessee College and Career Readiness Consortium funded through an Investing in Innovation (i3) grant funded by the U. S. Department of Education and awarded to the Niswonger Foundation.

Dr. Moody received her associate’s and bachelor’s degrees in nursing from Eastern Kentucky University and earned a master of science in nursing from the Texas Women’s University Institute of Health Sciences-Houston Center in 1978.  She also received a doctorate in nursing from the University of Alabama at Birmingham’s School of Nursing.

During her career, Dr. Moody has been recognized by all three of her alma maters, Eastern Kentucky University, Texas Woman’s University and the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing, where she received the Chancellor’s Alumni Excellence Award.

She is married to Tom Moody, a self-employed public accountant. She and Tom are proud parents of two adult children, daughter, Mykel, and son, Adam.

 

 

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Pioneer Fishing Club takes top spot in Southeastern tournament

Pioneer Fishing Club takes top spot in Southeastern tournament

Posted on 27 February 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

The Tusculum College Fishing Club took first place in this weekend’s YETI FLW College Fishing Southeastern Conference event at Lake Guntersville.

Tusculum took the top spot with a slim 3-ounce margin over runner-up, the University of Georgia and in the process topped the largest field ever assembled for a college bass fishing tournament at 248 teams.

According to tournament officials, the new participation record eclipses the previous mark of 214 teams set last season at the Bassmaster College Series Southern Regional at Lake Martin. The previous FLW record was set and later matched in 2016 at the FLW College Fishing Open on Kentucky Lake in April and the Southeastern Conference qualifier at Lake Chickamauga in September.

For its win at Guntersville, the Tusculum team of Nick Hatfield, a senior business administration major from Greeneville, and Cory Neece, a junior environmental science major from Bristol, earned a spot in the 2018 FLW College Fishing National Championship. The top 24 teams qualified for the championship from this event: the top 10 plus one additional team for every 10 teams over 100 that participated.

According to Neece, the keys to the team’s success were staying shallow around grass and accommodating for windy, post-frontal conditions.

“We found a lot of fish in practice, but the wind and the mud washed a lot of areas out because it was so bad out there today,” he says. “We had a couple of areas that were protected, and that’s where we caught our fish.”

He added. “You had to fish them real slow and had to pick the area apart to get them to bite, and really we were making multiple casts in the same spot. You know the fish are there. It’s just getting them to bite.”

As a result team being among the top 10 qualifiers in the tournament, the Fishing Club program received a donation of $2,000 from Fishing League Worldwide. The money will be put into the Tusculum Fishing Club program.

The Pioneer Fishing Club is sponsored by Dr. Jason Jones, assistant professor of physical education. Anyone interested in the club should email nickhatfield.nh@gmail.com.

 

Nick Hatfield and Corey Neece of Tusculum College

 

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New degree programs starting in the fall

New degree programs starting in the fall

Posted on 08 February 2017 by eestes@tusculum.edu

Tusculum College has several new degree programs coming next fall. Starting in August 2017 will be Bachelor’s programs in health care management and talent development as well as a Master program in accountancy.

Health Care Management

The Bachelor of Science in healthcare management is designed to prepare graduates for entry-level positions that manage day-to-day operations of healthcare organizations by giving them a firm foundation in the core disciplines of healthcare administration and management.

The program with be offered through both the traditional day program and the Graduate and Professional Studies program. The GPS program is a fully online program and may be completed in 21 months.

According to Dr. Lois Ewen, dean of the School of Nursing, Health Sciences and Human Services and professor of nursing, career opportunities for persons holding a Bachelor of Science in healthcare management can be found within a variety of healthcare organizations such as hospitals, long-term care facilities, public health agencies, outpatient facilities and doctors’ offices.

“Healthcare continues to be a dynamic and growing industry. Increased government involvement, new technology and changing population demographics have caused the business of healthcare to evolve, as well,” said Dr. Ewen. “With the industry facing a greater need for quality care, increased competition, decreasing financial reimbursements for provided services and the need to closely monitor costs, healthcare managers and providers are being challenged to operate more like traditional businesses, weighing how their decisions impact the quality of healthcare while assessing them from a business perspective.”

The bachelor’s degree in healthcare management at Tusculum College intentionally combines business and healthcare administration courses with the goal of preparing graduates to take advantage of the healthcare industry’s movement towards a more traditional business model, according to Dr. Michael Dillon, dean of the School of Business and associate professor of business.

The program is designed for anyone who would like to begin a career or advance their current career in healthcare and is a particularly good opportunity for current healthcare employees who have already earned an associate degree in a healthcare technical field but require a bachelor’s degree to seek a managerial position.

According to a survey by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, careers within the healthcare management field are expected to grow nearly 17 percent through the year 2024, 10 percent faster than the total national employment average, which is 6.5 percent. Additionally, the survey notes the median pay for medical and health service managers is $94,000 per year.

Talent Development

Tusculum College will begin both a Bachelor’s degree program in talent development and a Master of Arts degree in education: talent development program. The master’s program was previously called the Human Resource Development program.

Applications are being accepted now for both programs for the first semester of the programs. The master’s program will be offered through the Graduate and Professional Studies program, while the bachelor’s degree program will be offered in both traditional and adult student programs.

According to Dr. Tricia Hunsader, dean of the school of education, career opportunities for persons holding this degree include corporate trainers, project managers, strategic planners, team developers, process analysts and performance improvement consultants, all of which are needed by a wide variety of organizations.

“The curriculum addresses the major segments of the talent development field by focusing on concepts, models, skills and methods. Courses are designed so that theoretical foundations are complemented with practice and application that enable students to build skills and competence,” said Dr. Hunsader.

The master’s degree program will be exclusively offered in a fully-online format.

The master’s level talent development program is designed to lead students to develop training materials and programs based upon curricular and instructional design best practices, assess organizational needs for enhancing performance, apply adult learning theory and the Instructional System Design model into practice for organizational learning needs, as well as evaluate learning and impact of learning and develop team behaviors and leadership.

The bachelor’s degree program will be offered in two formats, one a fully online program and the other a hybrid program composed of a combination of online coursework and in class instruction.

According to Dr. Hunsader, the bachelor’s degree in talent development at Tusculum College will prepare students to work in organizations as entry level training and talent development. As they work towards the completion of their degree, students will develop skills in human resource development and training, instructional design, curriculum design, leadership, employee evaluation and adult learning.

For more information on these programs, contact Katie Tassell, senior enrollment representative, at 888.488.7285.

 

Master of Accountancy

Tusculum College has announced a new Master of Accountancy program beginning fall 2017, pending approval by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges.

Graduates of the Master of Accountancy program have multiple career options including, but not limited to, forensic accounting, public accounting, auditing and compliance accounting, government accounting, and tax and payroll accounting.

According to Dr. Michael Dillon, dean of the School of Business and associate professor of business, earning a graduate degree in accounting is a common practice for those seeking attainment of a Certified Public Accounting license.

“The Tusculum College Master of Accountancy program was developed to provide students with a deeper and broader accounting education that prepares them for advanced career opportunities and preparation for the new set of CPA exams effective spring 2017,” said Dr. Dillon. “The Master of Accountancy program will be led by faculty that are highly qualified academically, but who also bring their extensive real world experience to the classroom.”

In the State of Tennessee, the requirements for application to complete the Certified Public Accounting examination were changed in March 2016, resulting in the requirement of 150 academic credit hours being removed. To sit for the CPA exam, candidates must now have a baccalaureate or higher degree with a major in accounting or a baccalaureate or higher degree with a major other than accounting which includes at least 30 semester credit hours in accounting (at least 24 credit hours in upper level coursework) and at least 24 semester credit hours in general business. The requirement of 150 academic credit hours is still required for the CPA license.

According to Dr. Dillon, the Tusculum College Master of Accountancy program curriculum was developed based on the announced changes to the 2017 CPA testing requirements.

“The program is an excellent option for new accounting undergraduates,” he said. “The program is also an excellent option for students who earned a business degree with some accounting coursework but need additional upper level accounting hours, or students who completed an undergraduate accounting program but have been out of the classroom for many years and need an up-to-date modern accounting curriculum.”

The Master of Accountancy program will be under Graduate and Professional Studies at Tusculum College.  While most Graduate and Professional Studies are designed for non-traditional, evening students, the Master of Accountancy program will be offered during the day.  Initially, the program will be offered at the Greeneville campus and at the Knoxville Regional Center simultaneously. The program is designed to be a one-year, full-time program beginning in the fall term and ending at the end of the summer term. The curriculum will be delivered during two afternoons each week.

 

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