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Tusculum President Dr. Nancy Moody announces retirement

Posted on 28 February 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

Dr. Nancy B. Moody, the first female to serve as president of Tusculum College, will retire at the end of 2017.

Dr. Moody submitted her letter of intent to the Tusculum Board of Trustees during their February meeting. She will continue to serve until December 31. She has served as president of Tusculum College since 2009.

Dr. Kenneth A. Bowman, chair of the board and 1970 alumnus of the college, said that a presidential search committee is being formed and will be chaired by Dr. Greg Nelson, a Tusculum College trustee. The Board will also be interviewing search firms for possible use in the search for a new president.

In her letter, Dr. Moody stated, “I am honored to have had the opportunity to serve as the 27th president, and first female president, of this historic institution. In the last 7.5 years, the most memorable events for me have been the relationships that I have had the good fortune of developing with students, the Board of Trustees, alumni, members of the local community, faculty and staff, and particularly with donors, most notably Verna June Meen.

“Verna June came to love Tusculum and her interactions at events with members of the Board and others.  She expressed on more than one occasion, how proud she was to have provided support to Tusculum College for the Meen Center for Science and Math and for two endowments, one to fund scholarships and one to fund an endowed professorship in Chemistry.”

Dr. Bowman said, “It was eight years ago that Dr. Moody began the interview process for the presidency at Tusculum College.  During her tenure, she has led the college into a new era of growth and expansion, in terms of bricks and mortar, academic programs and fiscal responsibility.”

He added that one of the highlights of her term has been the construction of the Meen Center, the larger of the two academic building constructed in approximately 50 years on the Tusculum campus. The Thomas G. Garland Library renovation was the first in 2008. Dr. Moody shepherded the state-of-the-art 100,000-square foot Meen Center project every step of the way, from the initial approval to the funding and finally to overseeing the construction of this state-of-the-art facility which was occupied by students and faculty last month.

Dr. Nancy B. Moody

He added, since assuming the college presidency as the first female in Tusculum’s history to hold the position, Dr. Moody has faced several challenges.

“During her first full year at Tusculum College, we had a very successful review by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges. Since that time, we have added new academic programs including criminal justice, bachelor’s and master’s degrees in nursing, an MBA program, the first associate degree program with more academic programs slated to begin this fall including a bachelor’s degree in healthcare management, a bachelor’s degree in talent development and a Master of Accountancy degree, all of which have been or will be reviewed and approved by SACSCOC.  We have also added new athletic programs in men’s and women’s lacrosse, track and field and STUNT, which will begin this fall.”

He continued, “Dr. Moody has embraced the opportunity to encourage faculty, staff, students and volunteers to push Tusculum College forward through creative teaching and learning into the world of online programming for dual enrollment, distance education and fully online programs.”

She has secured a total of $49.8 million in Community Facilities direct loans from the U.S. Department of Agriculture for the construction of the new science and math facility, as well as for the construction of two new apartment-style residence halls. The lower 40-year, fixed-rate interest rates on these loans significantly lowered what the college pays in debt service, making the new construction and renovation possible while also improving the college’s overall finances.

Dr. Moody also led the efforts that secured a $3.875 million gift for the naming of the Meen Center and two $1.5 million endowments to support faculty and students. She has successfully sought new gifts, donors and partnership in order to ensure the success of the new and existing programs. Working with donors, foundations and government agencies, she has encouraged the investment of millions of dollars into Tusculum College’s growth.

Dr. Bowman added that during her tenure, cash increased from $1.3 million to $3.7 million, long-term investments increased from $12.5 million to $27.7 million, capital assets increased from $58.9 million to $71.8 million and the college’s endowment increased from $14 million to $18.6 million.

The college’s Board of Trustees recognized Dr. Moody’s contributions to Tusculum by presenting her with the inaugural Founder’s Award in February 2013. The Founders’ Award, named in memory of Rev. Samuel Doak, Rev. Samuel Witherspoon Doak and Rev. Hezekiah Balch, is presented by the Tusculum College Board of Trustees to recognize those who with integrity, tenacity, commitment, ingenuity and drive have moved Tusculum College forward in serving its students, its community and the world at large.

Among other significant accomplishments, Dr. Moody was instrumental in obtaining a $264,000 grant from the BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee Health Foundation for a simulation laboratory for use in the nursing and related programs by students and staff and area community partners. The simulation lab is used to produce highly-qualified BSN graduates skilled at clinical decision-making, who will provide safe, competent and improved health care for future generations of Tennesseans.

Partnerships with other institutions are at an all-time high. Tusculum College has arranged articulation and affiliation agreements with regional community colleges and professional schools to both increase enrollment in the bachelor’s degree programs and afford expedited graduate school opportunities for alumni of Tusculum College.

“She has engaged with alumni and friends of the College, encouraging their continued interest and support in the institution. She has reminded all of the Tusculum community what it means to be a Tusculum Pioneer,” said Dr. Bowman.

Prior to joining Tusculum College, Dr. Moody was president of Lincoln Memorial University for seven years.  Under her leadership, LMU’s enrollment increased by 90 percent.  The university also initiated the Lincoln Memorial University-DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine and expanded the Caylor School of Nursing to include a master of science in nursing degree program with family nurse practitioner and nurse anesthesia concentrations.  Other programs initiated under her leadership included a master’s degree program preparing physician’s assistants and a doctorate of education degree.

A registered nurse, Dr. Moody began her academic career as a nursing instructor for Lincoln Memorial University in 1974 and advanced to hold several academic leadership positions there – including dean of the School of Nursing and Allied Health.  associate professor and department chair in the College of Nursing at East Tennessee State University, as the executive director of the Tennessee Center for Nursing, as assistant professor of nursing in the College of Nursing at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

Prior to joining Tusculum College, Dr. Moody was president of Lincoln Memorial University for seven years.  Under her leadership, LMU’s enrollment increased by 90 percent.  The university also initiated the Lincoln Memorial University-DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine and expanded the Caylor School of Nursing to include a master of science in nursing degree program with family nurse practitioner and nurse anesthesia concentrations.  Other programs initiated under her leadership included a master’s degree program preparing physician’s assistants and a doctorate of education degree.

She is the newly-elected chair of the Board of Trustees of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges, and has served as chair of the NCAA DII South Atlantic Conference, and an advisory board member for the Northeast Tennessee College and Career Readiness Consortium funded through an Investing in Innovation (i3) grant funded by the U. S. Department of Education and awarded to the Niswonger Foundation.

Dr. Moody received her associate’s and bachelor’s degrees in nursing from Eastern Kentucky University and earned a master of science in nursing from the Texas Women’s University Institute of Health Sciences-Houston Center in 1978.  She also received a doctorate in nursing from the University of Alabama at Birmingham’s School of Nursing.

During her career, Dr. Moody has been recognized by all three of her alma maters, Eastern Kentucky University, Texas Woman’s University and the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing, where she received the Chancellor’s Alumni Excellence Award.

She is married to Tom Moody, a self-employed public accountant. She and Tom are proud parents of two adult children, daughter, Mykel, and son, Adam.

 

 

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Tusculum College’s Pioneer Fishing Club takes top spot in College Fishing Southeastern Conference event

Posted on 27 February 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

The Tusculum College Fishing Club took first place in this weekend’s YETI FLW College Fishing Southeastern Conference event at Lake Guntersville.

Tusculum took the top spot with a slim 3-ounce margin over runner-up, the University of Georgia and in the process topped the largest field ever assembled for a college bass fishing tournament at 248 teams.

According to tournament officials, the new participation record eclipses the previous mark of 214 teams set last season at the Bassmaster College Series Southern Regional at Lake Martin. The previous FLW record was set and later matched in 2016 at the FLW College Fishing Open on Kentucky Lake in April and the Southeastern Conference qualifier at Lake Chickamauga in September.

For its win at Guntersville, the Tusculum team of Nick Hatfield, a senior business administration major from Greeneville, and Cory Neece, a junior environmental science major from Bristol, earned a spot in the 2018 FLW College Fishing National Championship. The top 24 teams qualified for the championship from this event: the top 10 plus one additional team for every 10 teams over 100 that participated.

According to Neece, the keys to the team’s success were staying shallow around grass and accommodating for windy, post-frontal conditions.

“We found a lot of fish in practice, but the wind and the mud washed a lot of areas out because it was so bad out there today,” he says. “We had a couple of areas that were protected, and that’s where we caught our fish.”

He added. “You had to fish them real slow and had to pick the area apart to get them to bite, and really we were making multiple casts in the same spot. You know the fish are there. It’s just getting them to bite.”

The Pioneer Fishing Club is sponsored by Dr. Jason Jones, assistant professor of physical education. Anyone interested in the club should email nickhatfield.nh@gmail.com.

 

Nick Hatfield and Corey Neece of Tusculum College

 

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Tusculum Board of Trustees encourage unity and diversity through resolution

Tusculum Board of Trustees encourage unity and diversity through resolution

Posted on 21 February 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

The Tusculum College Board of Trustees approved a Resolution of Unity at their meeting held Saturday, Feb. 18, on the college’s Greeneville campus. This was the 688th meeting of the Board of Trustees.

The resolution, signed by Board of Trustees Chair Kenneth A. Bowman, Secretary Mark Williams and President Nancy Moody, addressed “recent national actions taken to promote national safety and security which have resulted in concern for members of the Tusculum College community due to the impact on individuals and the uncertainty at hand.”

Dr. Bowman, a 1970 graduate of Tusculum, stated that the college’s practice of diversity and inclusion have enriched the college’s ability to achieve the mission to provide “a liberal arts education in a Judeo-Christian and civic arts environment, with pathways for career preparation, personal development and civic engagement;” and “the attainment of each of the elements of our mission is enhanced by the contributions of each member of our Tusculum community, our students, staff, faculty, alumni, board members, donors and others within the broader community. He added that each member of the Tusculum community enriches the ‘Tusculum Experience,’ and the loss of any member of our community is seen as a thread pulled from the college’s rich tapestry.”

The resolution encouraged every member of the Tusculum Community to look to the civic arts tradition in daily interactions and that each individual take personal responsibility for preserving this inclusive environment where respectful exchange and the exploration of ideas not only contribute to knowledge, but also to social, physical, intellectual, emotional and spiritual growth and development.

Dr. Jason Pierce, vice president of academic affairs, reported to the Board’s Academic Affairs Committee that there are more than a dozen approved search committees, many for positions tied to new programs approved by the Board at the October meeting.

New programs beginning this fall include the Master of Accountancy, pending approval by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges.

Graduates of the Master of Accountancy program have multiple career options including, but not limited to, forensic accounting, public accounting, auditing and compliance accounting, government accounting, and tax and payroll accounting.  According to Dr. Michael Dillon, dean of the School of Business and associate professor of business, earning a graduate degree in accounting is a common practice for those seeking attainment of a Certified Public Accounting license.

“The Tusculum College Master of Accountancy program was developed to provide students with a deeper and broader accounting education that prepares them for advanced career opportunities and preparation for the new set of CPA exams effective spring 2017,” said Dr. Dillon. “The Master of Accountancy program will be led by faculty that are highly qualified academically, but who also bring their extensive real world experience to the classroom.”

Also beginning this fall will be the Master of Arts degree in education: talent development and the Bachelor of Arts degree in talent development. The master’s program will be offered through the Graduate and Professional Studies program, while the bachelor’s degree program will be offered in both traditional and adult student programs.

According to Dr. Tricia Hunsader, dean of the school of education, career opportunities for persons holding this degree include corporate trainers, project managers, strategic planners, team developers, process analysts and performance improvement consultants, all of which are needed by a wide variety of organizations.

“The curriculum addresses the major segments of the talent development field by focusing on concepts, models, skills and methods. Courses are designed so that theoretical foundations are complemented with practice and application that enable students to build skills and competence,” said Dr. Hunsader.

The master’s degree program will be exclusively offered in a fully-online format. The master’s level talent development program is designed to lead students to develop training materials and programs based upon curricular and instructional design best practices, assess organizational needs for enhancing performance, apply adult learning theory and the Instructional System Design model into practice for organizational learning needs, as well as evaluate learning and impact of learning and develop team behaviors and leadership.

The bachelor’s degree program will be offered in two formats, one a fully online program and the other a hybrid program composed of a combination of online coursework and in class instruction.

Other new programs include a Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Management and new majors in chemistry, environmental studies, environmental science and information technology.

Board members also heard a report on current and anticipated enrollment numbers. In the enrollment report, it stated that new students for spring 2017 included 42 in the residential program and 134 in the Graduate and Professional Studies program.

For the residential program, admissions representatives are currently reviewing 1,799 applications which add been received as of Feb. 8, in anticipation of an incoming fall class of approximately 425 new students.

“Tusculum College’s residential program continues to grow for a number of reasons,” said Dr. Nancy B. Moody president of Tusculum College. “Our unique Civic Arts focus takes the liberal arts a step further in a nationally recognized approach to educating individuals of integrity and ideals. Additionally a wide range of majors – from museum studies to nursing – are combined with service learning and travel opportunities to create a completely unique environment.”

Two faculty promotions were approved including Dr. Peter Noll, who was promoted to the rank of associate professor of public history and museum studies, and Dr. Travis Williams, who was promoted to the rank of associate professor of religion.

The Board also approved May 2017 graduates pending satisfactory completion of programs of student and certification by the Registrar.

The next meeting of the Tusculum College Board of Trustees will be May 2017.

 

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Appointments are still available for free tax program offered through Tusculum

Appointments are still available for free tax program offered through Tusculum

Posted on 13 February 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

Free tax preparation and filing services, offered by Tusculum College’s new Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program, are still available by appointment for residents in Greene and surrounding counties.

The IRS-certified tax preparation program currently provides two locations in Greene County, as well as a location in Gray  where trained volunteers are available to assist members of the public with the preparation of their tax returns and to answer any tax questions they may have.

Locations include: Monday nights at Appalachian Community Federal Credit Union’s community room in Gray, Thursdays at Tusculum College and Saturdays at Greeneville Power and Light. Appointments are available through April 13.

Led by Dr. Harold Branstrator, associate professor of management at Tusculum College, the VITA program offers a free alternative to the expensive services of a paid tax professional. The student volunteers of the VITA program have completed roughly 1,000 returns annually since 2014, often saving clients $200 or more that they would have spent on payments for alternative, fee-based, services.

“There are still appointments available in Greene County at both the Tusculum and Greeneville Light and Power System sites,” said Dr. Branstrator. “We encourage anyone who qualifies to take advantage of this free, professional program with IRS-trained volunteers. There is no expense to the filer to have their federal income tax prepared and filed.”

Taxpayers eligible for VITA services include: individuals with annual incomes of less than $54,000, individuals over 55 years of age, individuals diagnosed with a physical disability and non English-speaking citizens.

Under the supervision of Dr. Branstrator, a former IRS employee, participants’ tax returns are prepared by Tusculum students who have completed a VITA-standard three-week certification process that facilitates their ability to meet the high level professional standards expected by the IRS.

Dr. Branstrator said the program has also helped students, particularly those in business-related fields of study, acquire real world experience that they could not obtain in the classroom.

Appointments are required. Sites and days of operation include:

Mondays: ACFCU, 5034 Bobby Hicks Highway, Gray, TN 5:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m.;

Thursdays: Tusculum College, Chalmers Conference Center in the Niswonger Commons, Greeneville, TN, 5:30-8:30 p.m.;

Saturdays: Greeneville Power and Light System Boardroom, 110 N. College St., Greeneville, TN 9 a.m. – noon.

To schedule an appointment, call (800) 378-3778 and wait for the operator, or register online at www.tusculum.edu/vita/.

 


 

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Tusculum College announces Master of Accountancy program

Posted on 07 February 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

Tusculum College has announced a new Master of Accountancy program beginning fall 2017, pending approval by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges.

Graduates of the Master of Accountancy program have multiple career options including, but not limited to, forensic accounting, public accounting, auditing and compliance accounting, government accounting, and tax and payroll accounting.

According to Dr. Michael Dillon, dean of the School of Business and associate professor of business, earning a graduate degree in accounting is a common practice for those seeking attainment of a Certified Public Accounting license.

“The Tusculum College Master of Accountancy program was developed to provide students with a deeper and broader accounting education that prepares them for advanced career opportunities and preparation for the new set of CPA exams effective spring 2017,” said Dr. Dillon. “The Master of Accountancy program will be led by faculty that are highly qualified academically, but who also bring their extensive real world experience to the classroom.”

In the State of Tennessee, the requirements for application to complete the Certified Public Accounting examination were changed in March 2016, resulting in the requirement of 150 academic credit hours being removed. To sit for the CPA exam, candidates must now have a baccalaureate or higher degree with a major in accounting or a baccalaureate or higher degree with a major other than accounting which includes at least 30 semester credit hours in accounting (at least 24 credit hours in upper level coursework) and at least 24 semester credit hours in general business. The requirement of 150 academic credit hours is still required for the CPA license.

According to Dr. Dillon, the Tusculum College Master of Accountancy program curriculum was developed based on the announced changes to the 2017 CPA testing requirements.

“The program is an excellent option for new accounting undergraduates,” he said. “The program is also an excellent option for students who earned a business degree with some accounting coursework but need additional upper level accounting hours, or students who completed an undergraduate accounting program but have been out of the classroom for many years and need an up-to-date modern accounting curriculum.”

The Master of Accountancy program will be under Graduate and Professional Studies at Tusculum College.  While most Graduate and Professional Studies are designed for non-traditional, evening students, the Master of Accountancy program will be offered during the day.  Initially, the program will be offered at the Greeneville campus and at the Knoxville Regional Center simultaneously. The program is designed to be a one-year, full-time program beginning in the fall term and ending at the end of the summer term. The curriculum will be delivered during two afternoons each week.

 

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Valentine’s Dinner and Swing Dance to benefit Tusculum College band program

Posted on 03 February 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

There are still tickets remaining for the Tusculum College Pioneer Jazz Band Valentine’s Day Dinner/Swing Dance benefit on Tuesday, Feb. 14, at the General Morgan Inn. The reception begins at 6 p.m. and dinner starts at 6:30 p.m. The event includes dinner and a performance of the Pioneer Jazz Band, along with special guests.

The Valentine’s Day event is a fundraiser to raise money for much-needed equipment for the entire Tusculum band program, according to David A. Price, director of music at Tusculum College.

“This will be our fourth year for this event and it has proven to be a popular and enjoyable way to celebrate Valentine’s Day,” said Price. “Each year we have had tremendous feedback on the quality of the food, as well as the fun of dancing the night away to the sounds of jazz standards.”

Ticket prices for the event are $55 per person or $400 for a table of eight guests. Both ticket and table purchases provide dance tickets, free dance lessons, an opening reception, dinner and a special dessert. Please call in advance to request a vegetarian substitution. A cash bar will be available and the Tusculum College Band Booster Club will be hosting a silent auction.

The deadline for ticket purchases is Friday, Feb. 10.

Dr. Bob and Christine Thorpe will teach dance lessons starting at 5:30 p.m.  the night of the dinner dance. This year, in preparation for the event, the college is also featuring swing dance lessons on Thursday Feb. 9, in the Chalmers Conference Center in the Niswonger Commons on the Tusculum College campus. The lessons are free to anyone that has tickets and has signed up to attend the event or $10 per person for those who have not purchased tickets to the event.

Valentine’s Day dinner benefit tickets are available for purchase at the General Morgan Inn or by contacting Price at 423-636-7303 or emailing daprice@tusculum.edu. A hotel package special is also available by contacting the General Morgan Inn at 423-787-1000.

Contact Price for special table reservations for larger group seating.

The Pioneer Band Program at Tusculum College began in 2010, with the creation of the Pioneer Pep Band. The Pep Band quickly became a much-enjoyed feature of the 2010 Pioneer football and basketball seasons as it performed at the Pioneer Club tailgate parties before each home football game and during pregame and half-time festivities.

Since that auspicious beginning a concert band, jazz band, marching band, handbell choir and several small ensembles have been added to the college’s original band program. These groups perform on campus several times each year in addition to the community events at which they perform.

 

 

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A note from the President to parents regarding the implications of the recent immigration ban for Tusculum students

A note from the President to parents regarding the implications of the recent immigration ban for Tusculum students

Posted on 03 February 2017 by eestes@tusculum.edu

 

 

 

Dear Tusculum parents and family members:

Recent actions taken to promote national safety and security have resulted in concern and anxiety for members of our community due to the impact on individuals and the uncertainty at hand.  These actions afford all members of the Tusculum College community a special opportunity to stop and reflect on how our heritage, and current practice, of diversity and inclusion have enriched our ability to achieve our mission to provide “a liberal arts education in a Judeo-Christian and civic arts environment, with pathways for career preparation, personal development and civic engagement.”

Attainment of each of the elements of our mission is enhanced by the contributions of each member of our Tusculum community, our students, staff, faculty, alumni, board members, donors and others within the broader community. Each member of our community enrich the “Tusculum Experience.”  The loss of any member of our community is seen as a thread pulled from our rich tapestry. Therefore, while we are not aware of any students, staff or faculty connected to the immigration ban on citizens of the seven nations named, we are all anxious about this situation and are paying close attention to daily developments.

Currently, we are cautioning those considering international travel during this time of uncertainty to seek counsel and we ask that anyone experiencing difficulties can make us aware if we can be of assistance.  International students who have questions about their ongoing status should consult with Melissa Ripley in the Admissions Office, and anyone experiencing distress can contact the Student Affairs Office to speak with a counselor or discuss other means by which we can be of support.

Finally, I note that dissent and the civil exchange of differing perspectives are fundamental elements in developing critical thinking, and in expanding our understanding of and appreciation for others. The College believes in encouraging discourse and dialogue while also challenging and preventing that which evolves into discrimination and harassment. I ask that each of us look to our civic arts tradition in our daily interactions and that each of us take personal responsibility for preserving this rare environment where respectful exchange and the exploration of ideas not only contributes to our knowledge, but also to our social, physical, intellectual, emotional and spiritual growth and development.

Sit Lux,

Dr. Nancy B. Moody, PhD

President

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Tusculum College healthcare management program enrolling for fall

Posted on 31 January 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

Tusculum College has begun accepting applications for the new healthcare management degree program, which will begin fall 2017.

The Bachelor of Science in healthcare management is designed to prepare graduates for entry-level positions that manage day-to-day operations of healthcare organizations by giving them a firm foundation in the core disciplines of healthcare administration and management.

The program with be offered through both the traditional day program and the Graduate and Professional Studies program. The GPS program is a fully online program and may be completed in 21 months.

According to Dr. Lois Ewen, dean of the School of Nursing, Health Sciences and Human Services and professor of nursing, career opportunities for persons holding a Bachelor of Science in healthcare management can be found within a variety of healthcare organizations such as hospitals, long-term care facilities, public health agencies, outpatient facilities and doctors’ offices.

“Healthcare continues to be a dynamic and growing industry. Increased government involvement, new technology and changing population demographics have caused the business of healthcare to evolve, as well,” said Dr. Ewen. “With the industry facing a greater need for quality care, increased competition, decreasing financial reimbursements for provided services and the need to closely monitor costs, healthcare managers and providers are being challenged to operate more like traditional businesses, weighing how their decisions impact the quality of healthcare while assessing them from a business perspective.”

The bachelor’s degree in healthcare management at Tusculum College intentionally combines business and healthcare administration courses with the goal of preparing graduates to take advantage of the healthcare industry’s movement towards a more traditional business model, according to Dr. Michael Dillon, dean of the School of Business and associate professor of business.

The program is designed for anyone who would like to begin a career or advance their current career in healthcare and is a particularly good opportunity for current healthcare employees who have already earned an associate degree in a healthcare technical field but require a bachelor’s degree to seek a managerial position.

According to a survey by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, careers within the healthcare management field are expected to grow nearly 17 percent through the year 2024, 10 percent faster than the total national employment average, which is 6.5 percent. Additionally, the survey notes the median pay for medical and health service managers is $94,000 per year.

 

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Tusculum College rolls out master and bachelor programs in talent development

Posted on 30 January 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

Tusculum College has announced two new programs to its academic catalog, the Master of Arts degree in education: talent development and the Bachelor of Arts degree in talent development.

Applications are being accepted now for both programs for the first semester of the programs, scheduled for fall 2017. The master’s program will be offered through the Graduate and Professional Studies program, while the bachelor’s degree program will be offered in both traditional and adult student programs.

According to Dr. Tricia Hunsader, dean of the school of education, career opportunities for persons holding this degree include corporate trainers, project managers, strategic planners, team developers, process analysts and performance improvement consultants, all of which are needed by a wide variety of organizations.

“The curriculum addresses the major segments of the talent development field by focusing on concepts, models, skills and methods. Courses are designed so that theoretical foundations are complemented with practice and application that enable students to build skills and competence,” said Dr. Hunsader.

The master’s degree program will be exclusively offered in a fully-online format.

The master’s level talent development program is designed to lead students to develop training materials and programs based upon curricular and instructional design best practices, assess organizational needs for enhancing performance, apply adult learning theory and the Instructional System Design model into practice for organizational learning needs, as well as evaluate learning and impact of learning and develop team behaviors and leadership.

The bachelor’s degree program will be offered in two formats, one a fully online program and the other a hybrid program composed of a combination of online coursework and in class instruction.

According to Dr. Hunsader, the bachelor’s degree in talent development at Tusculum College will prepare students to work in organizations as entry level training and talent development. As they work towards the completion of their degree, students will develop skills in human resource development and training, instructional design, curriculum design, leadership, employee evaluation and adult learning.

For more information on these programs or to enroll, contact Katie Tassell, senior enrollment representative, at 888.488.7285.

 

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Tusculum College math and computer science program for area teachers kicks-off on Feb. 10

Posted on 27 January 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

A new program designed to improve the skills of area high school math and computer science teachers will kick-off at Tusculum College on Friday, Feb. 10.

This marks the first workshop of the Tusculum College Python TEAM2 Project and will include a full-day workshop for computer science and mathematics teachers from 20 area high schools who will spend the day in the new Ronald H. and Verna June Meen Center for Science and Math.

Tusculum College has received a $74,991 grant from the Tennessee Higher Education Commission to fund the regional educational effort.

The Tusculum College Python TEAM2 project is designed to enhance the content knowledge, pedagogical skills and pedagogical content knowledge of high school mathematics and computer science teachers in the high-needs school districts surrounding Tusculum College’s home campus in Greene County and its instructional sites in Hamblen and Knox counties.

Participating educators will benefit from five on-site days of professional development in Tusculum College’s Meen Center for Science and Math along with a 10-month online credit-bearing course in the Python computer language. The content focus will be on the use of Python computer programming to solve mathematical problems. Participants will explore mathematical concepts, learn the Python programming language and develop programs to solve the kinds of problems they teach in their high school classrooms.

According to Dr. Tricia Hunsader, dean of the School of Education and professor of education, participants’ growth in content knowledge related to mathematics concepts, programming basics and the Python computer language will be assessed via a pre-test and post-test. Participant surveys will assess teachers’ perceptions of the learning experiences and their growth in content knowledge, pedagogical skills, and pedagogical content knowledge.

“The primary content objectives are to increase high school mathematics and computer science teachers’ knowledge of and practical skills in fundamental mathematical concepts directly applicable to computer programming, essential structures and algorithms used in object-oriented programming, the writing of Python code to solve mathematical problems and numerical methods applicable to the high school mathematics curriculum,” said Dr. Hunsader.

The program is a partnership among Tusculum College’s Department of Mathematics and Computer Science within the School of Arts and Sciences, Tusculum College’s School of Education and regional high-need school systems, which include Greene County, Greeneville City, Hamblen County, Hawkins County, Jefferson County, Knox County and Washington County school districts.

THEC administers this federal program, which was established to provide grants for colleges and universities to develop and implement workshops for K-12 teachers in the areas of mathematics, science and humanities. The purpose is to establish a collaborative planning partnership between higher education and K-12 education for teacher preparation and continuing professional development. – See more at: https://www.tn.gov/thec/article/itq#sthash.VkHDDXu5.dpuf.

 

 

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Art gallery reopens in Shulman Center

Art gallery reopens in Shulman Center

Posted on 18 January 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

Tusculum College will re-open its Allison Gallery in a new location in January with a reception for J. Clement Allison. Allison, the gallery’s namesake, will be the new location’s first featured artist.

According to Wayne Thomas, dean of the School of Arts and Sciences and associate professor of English, the gallery has been relocated to the Shulman Center on the eastern side of the college campus. “The new location is spectacular,” said Thomas, “And, we are excited to celebrate the re-opening with an exhibition from Clem Allison.”

The first show, a retrospective exhibition of Allison’s artwork over the course of his lifetime, will be available for viewing January 18 – February 15. There is no admission fee and the event is open to the public. Additionally, a closing reception will be held on Friday, Feb. 10, from 4-7 p.m.

Clem Allison

The Allison Gallery, named in appreciation of J. Clement Allison’s three decades of exemplary commitment to Tusculum College, was created to provide a venue for a variety of artistic experience. To further this mission, the gallery hosts the exhibitions of local and regional artists as well as exhibitions by Tusculum College’s art students.

Artists of regional and national prominence are displayed year round, providing a unique and useful tool for the college community by allowing students, faculty and staff to view and experience art from across the country without leaving the Tusculum campus.

The residents of Tusculum, Greeneville and other surrounding communities also benefit from the opportunity, provided by the Allison Gallery, to access art from across the country at a local, easy to reach location. In fact, The Allison Gallery is the only art gallery in the Greene County area containing exhibitions from a wide array of both national and local artists and one of only a few such galleries in the region.

 

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Tusculum College students assist with FocusFirst vision project

Posted on 17 January 2017 by srichey@tusculum.edu

Tusculum College students are working with Impact America to bring vision screenings to pre-school students through a project called FocusFirst.

Beginning in September, students from Tusculum participated in the project through the school’s annual Nettie Fowler McCormick Service Day. According to Dr. Ronda Gentry, director of the Center for Civic Advancement at the college, six different daycares/preschools were visited and volunteers used a special high-tech photo optic scan camera, provided by the program, to identify any  child with vision issues. Those who were identified were then referred to local physicians who treated them at low/no cost.

The goal of FocusFirst is to provide a cost-effective direct response to the vision problems of children living in urban and rural communities. During Fall 2016, Impact America – Tennessee AmeriCorps Members, working with college student volunteers, provided free vision screenings to more than 14,500 children at 414 Head Starts and daycare centers located in low-income communities in 16 Tennessee counties.

Tusculum College became the first to partner with Focus First in the State of Tennessee, now joined by The University of Tennessee. For the spring semester, Dr. Melinda Dukes, professor of psychology, will be working with a group of her students to screen at daycares and preschools as part of a service-learning project for her courses.

According to Dr. Gentry, the plan is to make the assessments a regular part of the college’s service to community efforts.

Since the fall, 2,964 children have been screened in Northeast Tennessee.

 

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